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Kansas State Historical Society, 



EMBRACING THE 



FIFTH AND SIXTH BIENNIAL REPORTS, 

1886-1888, 



TOGETHER WITH COPIES OF OFFICIAL PAPERS DURING A PORTION OF THE ADMINIS- 
TRATION OF GOVERNOR WILSON SHANNON, 1856, AND THE EXECUTIVE 
MINUTES OF GOVERNOR JOHN W. GEARY DURING HIS ADMIN- 
ISTRATION, BEGINNING SEPTEMBER 9, 18-)6, AND 
ENDING MARCH 10, 1857. 



Compiled by F. G. ADAMS, Secbetary. 



VOL. lY. 




TOPEKA. 

KANSAS PUBLISHING HOUSE: CLIFFOBD C. BAKEE, STATE PEINTER. 
1890. 



r 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. ^^33 
V4 

Q^r<Ts for the yean 1887-8 : 

DAXIKL W. WIIJ>KR, llUwntha Pbksident. 

IIEXHY II. \»TLLIAMS. (>mwi»t4>nHe, < Vicb-Pbe8IDKNT8. 

TIIOMIS A. McNEAL, Mwllclne Ixnlge, f 

FKANKUN O. ADAMS. Topeka Secbbtaby. 

JOHN FlUVCIS, Topeka . . . . • Treasurer. 

For thf i/rtir ISN9 : 

Cau. ^-M. A. PHILLIPS, ftullna President. 

C**u iTRl'S K. IIOLLIDAV. T.nK.ki», f Vice-Presidents. 

How. JAMI'^ S. EMKKY. I^iwrfnc*', ^ 

FRA.VKUN O. ADAMS, TojiekH Secretary. 

UoM. JOHN FRAN'Cl.S, Toi»k« Treasurer. 

For the year /«*90 : 

Cou CYKI'S K. HOLLIDA Y, Tnin-ka President. 

Hon. JAMES S. EMEHY. I-.iwrt.ncf. ^ Vice-Presidents. 

Oov. LYMAN r. lirMI'HHKY, In«lei>en<lence. S 

FRANKLIN O. ADAMS, T-.j^'ka Secretary. 

Ho?i. JONH KKANCIS. TojR.ka Treasurer. 



DIRECTORS 



M«>mb<>rN <»f lh«» lV»anl of Dlrt'ctors for the 

AXTMOMT. D. K I^avrn irorth. 

I14.1JCY. L D (iaiyltn CHty. 

HaKRK, F. P TnlH-kit. 

Ball, Volkbt I.»tut>ln. 

ExoUJiil. A.N Wichita. 

KMRaiiMiK. ('. V F.mjKtriti. 

VjkkTHim, JoHlf Topekfi. 

Out K. Oko. W ...Xti-hixon. 

U«Mili»uw, \»kxc T Manhattan. 

UaucxK. A. K ( 'i-tltir Vale. 

OkkKK, Eu. P Winfirlil. 

II AMILTUK. i. W HV//^■«y^»n. 

HlLLKIL. <*. A Salina. 

Holt. Joel Ii,h,it. 

HtMrUKKT. L. r Imleitcmlfnce. | 

JollKi^ Joti5 P. . Voliltntter. 

KluuMAV. S. A Tin>eka. \ 

Minnbrr* of the Board of Dlreotorn for the term 

Au»M«. F. a Topeka. I 

Boom. IfKWBt lAirnetl. 

CikK. F^ T lA^ttenirorth. ' 

VkUUuLU Ku l^ivenirorth. \ 

('HaiJiTtAjt. J\uu» Arhinsaji City. 

I>ALL4«, E. J Topeka. 

Ki>« 4atM. W. C lAinud. 

EujoTT. 1^ B Manhattan. 

Emkrt. i. S tjurrencf. ' 

OoM. N. S Toprkii. 

Hawji*. II. J. F Wakerney. 

il*T«. It. R Onftorne. 

lUtXKk, D. » liretit Henil. 

IIILI-, F. M Cedar Vate. 

Iloixttuv. r. K Toi^ka. 

HorKiR., iH-tm Horhm. 

HiMrHkRT.JAimi Junction City 

MtMolMT* of the Board of Dlr(«ctnrH for the term 

kutntrt, J. B i>es,,to. I 

Manhattan. 

(Mtatrti. 

lAitfrenve. 

iMtcrence. 

lui trrenre. ' 

Uayg ^ Hty. 



Ar 



"11 



I- 

»i 1 

} I II- I'.N. 

1° tlU< Mill 

II M I. (ir 

Hi.. ..... 



N. A 

''KO. T. . 

I . W 

UMM H 

' kxhako., 

«. H 

. It a 

N. Mrxnr 



^MU}t«o», A. S 
Kkixooo. L. B 



. Ijiitfrmre. 

Atchison. 

Manhattan. 

Topeka. 
. Toiieka, 
. Marion. 
.Atrhimm. 

Tiijteka. 

Topekfi. 

Umpuriu. 



term endlii>^ .Jrttumrj' 21), 1891 : 

I..ANE, V. J Kansas City. 

Lecjate, J ah. F Leavenworth. 

Lehteh, H. N Syracuse. 

McBride, Wm. H Osborne. 

McIntire, T Arkansas City. 

Martin. John A Atdtison. 

Moore, H. Miles Leavenworth. 

Phillips, W. A Salina. 

Reynolds, M. W Genda Springs. 

Riddle, A. P Minneuijolis. 

Robinson. Chas La irrence. 

Russell, Edward Lawrence. 

Speer, John Sherlock. 

Ware, K. F Fort Scott. 

Wilder, D. W Hmwatha. 

Wrioht, R. M Dodae City. 



ending January 19, 1892 : 

Jones, C. J Garden City. 

Lowe. P. G Leavenworth. 

Martin, Geo. W Kansas City. 

McTAutiART, D Liberty. 

Mead, J. R Wichita. 

MooDV. Joel Mound City. 

Peck, George R Tojteka. 

Reynolds, Adrian Seilan. 

ScHii.LiNo, John Hiamttfut. 

SiMPHON, IJ. F Tot>eka. 

8TOTLER, Jacob Wellington. 

Street, W. D Decatur. 

SwENssoN. C. A McPherson. 

Thacher, T. D Topeka. 

Walbond, Z. T Osborne 

Wkllhousk, F Fairmount. 



endinK January 17, 1893 : 

Kelly. H. B 

Kimball, C. H 

LlPPIN<-OTT. J. A 

McCarthy. Timothy. . 

McNeal, T. a 

McVicar, Peter . . 

Miller, Sol ^^„„. 

MuRDocK, M. M Wivhita. 

Murdoch, T. B ei Dorado. 

PRENTIH Noble Newton. 

"rx^.^HAs^F.::: S?^^"- 

T;S^'I.:::::::;:::::::::::Kr^• 

QUA.-LE, W. A ....Z'dX-City. 

Valentine, D. A ciay Center 



. . . McPherson. 
. . . Parsons. 
. . . Topeka. 
. ..Lamed. 
. ..Medicine Lodge. 
. . . Topeka. 
Troy. 



CONTENTS. 



Annual Meetings, 1887, 
Fifth Biennial Repoet, 

Yearly Growth of the Library, 

Public Documents, 

Sources of Accession, . 

Newspaper Accessions, 

Portraits, .... 

Cataloging and Classification, 

Principal Book Accessions, . 

Donors of Books and Pamphlets, 

Donors of Manuscript, 

Donors of Maps, Atlases, etc., 

Donors of Pictures, 

Donors of Currency, Scrip and Coin, 

Miscellaneous Contributions, 

Newspaper Files and Periodicals Donated, 

Bound Newspaper Files and Periodicals in the Library, 

Current Newspapers and Periodicals being Received, 

Finances, 1886, .... 

Meeting of the Board of Directors, 
Sixth Biennial Repoet, 

Yearly Growth of the Library, 

Mention of Donations, 

Character of the Library, 

Relation of the Society to the State, 

Legal Requirements, 

Broad Field of Work, 

Province of the Historical Society, 

Newspapers as Materials of History, 

Spirit of the Kansas Press, 

The Work exceeds the Means, 

Lack of Room, . . . . - 

Society's Seal, .... 

List of Addresses before the Society, 

Term of Office of President, 

Finances, 1887, 

Finances, 1888, .... 

Principal Library Accessions, 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



and 



Relics, 



Issues being received 



17, 1888, 



8ixT« BiMHiAL Kmponr— Continued: 

Donors of Books and Pamphlets, 

Donors of Manuscripts, 

Donors of Maps, Charts and Atlases 

Donors of Pictures, 

Donors of Scrip, Coins and Medals, 

Donors of War Relics, 

Donors of Miscellaneous Contributions 

Donors of Sinj^le Newspapers, 

Donors of Newspaper Files, 

Bound Newspapers and Periodicals, 

Newspapers and Periodicals — Current 

Thirteenth Annual Meeting, 1889, 

Special Meetings, 1889, 

Fourteenth Annual Meeting, 1890, 

Collections, 1886 1890, 

President Wilder's Address at the Annual Meeting, Jan. 17, 1888 

Address of Prof. Isaac T. Goodnow. Jan. 17, 1888, 

Address of ex-Chief Justice Samuel A. Kingman, Jan. 

Address of Prof. W. H. Carruth, Jan. 17, 1888, '. 

Address of Charles F. Scott, Jan. 17, 1888, 

Address of Hon. H. N. Lester, Jan. 17, 1888, 

Address of Hon. J. Ware Butterfield, Jan. 17, 1888, 

Address of C. Borin, Jan. 17, 1888, 

Address of Hon. James F. Legate, Jan. 17, 1888, 

Paper by Hon. John P. Jones, for the Annual Meeting, Jan. 17 

Paper by J. S. Painter, for the Annual Meeting, Jan 

Paper by Prof. C. A. Swensson, for the Annual Meeting, Jan. 17 

Address by Hon. James Humphrey, Jan. 15, 1889, 

Address by John C. McCoy, Jan. 15, 1889, . 

Address by Maj. James B. Abbott, Jan. 16, 1889, 

Address by Hon. H. B. Kelly, Feb. 11, 1889, 

AddreMi by Hon. Joel Moody, Feb. 4, 1889, 

AddreM by Preeident Wm. A. Phillips, at the Annual 
1890, 

Address by Hon. Percival O. Lowe, Jan. 21, 1890, 

Eologiom of Hon. B. F. Simpson, on Governor Martin, 

Biography of Gov. John W. Geary, 

Message of President Pierce, 1856, 

Correspondence of Gov. Shannon, 

Correspondence of Gov. Geary, . 

Bxeootive Minotes of Gov. Geary, 

' OsaiftAL Imdbx, 

CHioMOLoaicAL Imdkx, 



Meeting, Jan. 21 



Jan. 21, 1890 



1888, 



1888, 



FIFTH BIENNIAL EEPOET 

OF THE 

KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



The annual meetings of the Society, and of the Board of Directors, 1887, 
were held at Topeka, on Tuesday, the 18th of January. 

Thfe Board of Directors met in the rooms of the Society, in the Capitol, 
at 3 p. M. 

In the absence of the President, Colonel D. R. Anthony, Major B. F. 
Simpson, one of the Vice Presidents, called the meeting to order. 

The following members of the Board of Directors were present : Governor 
John A. Martin, ex-Governor Thomas A. Osborn, ex-Chief Justice Samuel 
A. Kingman, Senator Sol. Miller, Senator P. G. Lowe, Colonel A. S. John- 
son, Hon. B. F. Simpson, Hon. John Francis, Hon. T. D. Thacher, Hon. 
Daniel W. Wilder, Hon. George W. Martin, Hon. F. P. Baker, Rev. I. T. 
Goodnow, Major Henry Inman, Hon. W. C. Edwards, Hon. R. M. Wright, 
Hon. J. V. Admire, Major J. B. Abbott, *Hon. V. J. Lane, Hon. L. R. 
Elliott, Hon. E. T. Carr, Hon. Ed. Russell, Hon. E. J. Dallas. 

Secretary F. G. Adams submitted for consideration a draft of the report of 
the Board, which, being read and amended, was, on motion of Mr. Thacher, 
adopted. 

On motion of Mr. Wilder, a committee of five was appointed to nominate 
persons to be recommended to the Society to fill the places in the Board of 
Directors, about to be made vacant by the expiration of the term of service 
of one-third of the members. The chair appointed the following as the 
committee: Messrs. Wilder, Thacher, Russell, Osborn, and Wright. 

The President of the Society, Colonel D. R. Anthony, having arrived, 
took the chair. 

General Wilder, from the Committee on Nominations, reported the names 
of persons selected as members of the Board of Directors to fill expired 
terms. The report, on motion of Governor Martin, was approved. 

Mr. Thacher, from the Executive Committee, made the following report, 
which was adopted : 

To THE BoAED OF DiBEOTOBs: Your Executive Committee, whose duty it is under 
the by-laws of the Society to examine and audit the accounts and vouchers of the 



8TATK HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY, 



TrMSQr«r of the State Historical Society, would report that they have examined the 
•ame, and find them to be correct, and as given in the report of the Secretary and 
TrMwarer herewith presented. T. D. Thaoheb. 

F. P. Bakeb. 

D. W. WiLDEB. 

Mmjor Simpeon offered the following amendment to the by-laws, which, 
DO motion of Judge Kingman, was adopted : 

At or before the commencement of each fiscal year a majority of the Executive 
Committee shall file with the Auditor of State a statement of the name of each per- 
•tin in the service of the Society entitled to stated compensation, showing the 
monthly salary of each, and such other facts as may be necessary; and if during the 
year obangee are made in the clerical force of the Society, it shall be the duty of the 
Ezeoaiive Committee, or a majority of them, to amend their statement in accord- 
ance with the changes so made. The vouchers for the miscellaneous expenses shall 
be approved by a majority of the Executive Committee before payment. 

Senator Lowe proposed the following as honorary members of the Society : 
General Phil. H. Sheridan, Washington, D. C. ; General D. H. Rucker, 
Washington, D. C. ; General R. C. Drum, Washington, D. C. ; General B. C. 
Card, Washington, D. C. ; General Stewart Van Vliet, Washington, D. C. 

Major Inman proposed the name of General P. St. Greorge Cooke, Detroit, 
Michigan. 

Mr. Thacher proposed the name of General John C. Fremont, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

On motion, these nominations were approved. 

The Secretary proposed the following as honorary members : Mrs. Lucy 
B. Armstrong, Wyandotte, Kansas; Mrs. Sara L. T. Robinson, Lawrence,. 
Kansas; Mre. Margaret \\. Wood, Strong City, Kansas; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Watrous Abbott, DeSoto, Kansas. 

Major Inman proposed the name of Mrs. Mary A. Humphrey, Junction 
City, Kansas. 

On motion of Judge Kingman, these nominations were approved. 

The following persons were proposed by the Secretary as corresponding 
roembere of the Society, and on motion they were nominated : Colonel Richard 
Owen, New Harmony, Ind. ; Dr. Samuel A. Green, Boston, Mass. ; Dr. W. H. 
Egle, Harriiiburg, Pa.; Hon. John Blair Linn, Bellefonte, Pa.; Rev. Rus- 
•ellN. Bellows. New York, N. Y.; Rev. Grindall Reynolds, Boston, Mass.; 
C». W. Fox, Esq., Boston, Mass. ; Samuel P. Jackson, Esq., Worcester, Mass.* 

The meeting of the Board then adjourned, to report its action to the an- 
nual meeting of the Society in the evening. 



«iU*!ll'^ ntV/ '"L'irl '' .'^''^" '*'*' nomination, for honorary and corresponding 
•ibm b«« Md« wen oonflnned bj elecUon. in accordance with the constitution. 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SOCIETY. 



The eleventh annual meeting o*f the Society convened in the hall of the 
House of Representatives at 7:30 p. m., January 18, 1887, Col. D. R. An- 
thony, President of the Society, in the chair. 

The chair stated that the first business in order was the reading and con- 
sideration of the report of the Board of Directors. At the request of the 
Secretary, Hon. T. D. Thacher read the report, as follows : 

FIFTH BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

The Board of Directors presents the following report of the work of the 
Society during the two years ending Jan. 18, 1887 : 

Bound volumes added to the library, 2,860; unbound volumes and pam- 
phlets, 10,008 ; volumes of newspapers and periodicals, 2,251 ; single news- 
papers and newspaper cuttings containing special historical material, 770 ; 
maps, atlases, etc., 82; manuscripts, 1,672; pictures, 274; miscellaneous 
contributions, 251 ; scrip, currency, etc., 41. 

Thus it will be seen that the library additions of books, pamphlets and 
newspaper files during the two years, number 15,119 volumes. Of these, 
14,092 have been procured by gift, and 1,027 by purchase. 

The total of the library at the present time is as follows, namely : 8,352 
bound volumes ; 21,103 unbound volumes ; 5,986 bound newspaper files and 
volumes of periodicals ; in all, 35,441 volumes. 

YEARLY GROWTH OF THE LIBRARY. 

The following is a statement of the yearly growth of the library in eleven 
years, 1876 to 1886, inclusive : 



Date. 


Volumes 
books. 


Volumes 
newspapers 

and 
periodicals. 


Pamphlets. 


Total yearly 
accessions. 


Yearly 
total 
of the 

library. 


1876 


280 
115 

1,237 
290 
448 
414 

1,669 
307 
732 

1,088 

1,.772 


54 
150 
710 
275 
448 
375 
513 
403 
807 
678 
1,573 


74 
501 
1,184 
491 
1,146 
1,127 
2,721 
1,088 
2,763 
2,033 
7,975 


408 
766 
3,131 
1,056 
2,042 
1,916 
4,903 
1,798 
4,302 
3,799 
11,320 


4(j8 


1877 


1,174 


1878 


4,305 

5,361 

7,403 

9,319 

14,222 

16,020 

20 322 


1879 


1880 


1881 

1882 


1883 


1884 . . . . . 


1885 


24,121 


1886 


35,441 


Totals 


8,352 


5,986 


21,103 


35,441 









The growth of the library during the two years has been greater than that 
for any similar period. This has been due, in part, to the growth of the State 
in population, adding to the number of home contributors to our collections. 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



iiency 



It has been largely due to the fact that the uninterrupted prosperity of the 
Society for the eleven years of its existence, and the unparalleled growth 
of ite 'library in that i^riod, has given the Society a reputation for perma- 
jncy which has attracted the attention of the older libraries and library 
orkere of the country, inducing great liberality on their part in gifts from 
their duplicate collections. 

Of such older lil>rarie8 which have thus made gifts to our collections dur- 
ing the past two years, the Boston Public Library, the Library of the Mas- 
sachusetts Historical Society, Boston, and the Library of the American 
Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts, have been most liberal. 
The contributions from these three libraries consist of the historical publica- 
tions of the societies themselves, of magazine volumes, newspaper files, and 
8uch publications of all classes as are gathered into historical libraries, largely 
of books and pamphlets upon historical subjects, and of the publications of 
societies and institutions of every kind— in a great measure of those numer- 
ous chariuble, educational and social organizations which so abound in 
New England. These are such publications as make little figure in the 
popular liU»rature of the day, but they contain the history of those institu- 
tions which form the basis of social and civil progress in a section of country 
which has contributetl vastly to the elements of progress everywhere. These 
publications, made accessible on the shelves of a library of historical refer- 
ence, form a guide to our |)eople in the founding and building up of like in- 
stitutions, growing up and to grow up in a State yet in its infancy. 

PUBLIC DOCUMENTS. 

The accessions of those publications of the United States Government 
which go to make up the materials of the political history of the country 
have been unusually large. At the request of Senator Ingalls, our library 
was early made a depository of such documents. They are received through 
the Interior Department as they are published, and distributed to certain 
designated libraries throughout the country. Added to what have come in 
year by year in this way, Senator Ingalls has, within the past two years, 
contributed largely from his own private collection. 

Senator Plumb has also been most coramendably attentive to the interests 
of our library, and its growth in the different classes of public documents has 
been largely due to constant contributions made by him from year to year. 
Representatives Morrill and Ryan and other members of our Congressional 
delegation have also added largely to our library. 

Large additions have been made, too, during the past year, by taking ad- 
vantage of the system of library exchanges, instituted by the Secretary of 
the Interior for the purpose of aiding libraries to complete sets of such 
documento by exchanges of duplicates, especially of such as come under the 
head of Congressional Debates. Of this class our library has received, 
during the two years, 17 volumes of the series denominated Annals of Con- 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 



gress, covering the period from 1789 to 1824 ; 29 volumes of the Register 
of Debates in Congress, 1824 to 1837; 74 volumes of the Congressional 
Globe, 1833 to 1872 ; 42 volumes of the Congressional Record, commencing 
with the year 1873 ; in all, 162 volumes of this class. Thus, with what Ave 
have otherwise secured with very little cost to the State, we have nearly a 
complete set of those volumes which contain a connected history of the dis- 
cussions in Congress and in the country of every important subject of public 
interest since the foundation of the Government, including that decade of 
years in which Kansas affairs occupied so conspicuous a part in Congres- 
sional proceedings. 

SOURCES OF ACCESSION. 

Experience teaches that a full library of local history is the most natural 
nucleus for a general library, and that the local is so related to and so 
naturally expands into the general, that no dividing line between the local 
and the general is practicable. Libraries of reference of whatever name 
are chiefly consulted for the historical and scientific information which may 
be found in them. That library is best appreciated by library-makers, and 
those who contribute to libraries, which best contains information respecting 
its own neighborhood and the State and country within its primary scope of 
collection, and upon such the fullest gifts are bestowed. Such a library 
pertains to the origin of things. It is unique ; it contains what no other 
library contains. It is not a mere duplicate of what a hundred other libra- 
ries in the country possess. It therefore attracts the attention of workers 
in historical and scientific investigation — of those whose business is that of 
research. Such a library engages the hearty interest and cooperation of 
other libraries of the country. Its duplicates of local historical materials 
are eagerly sought for, and compensated by bountiful gifts from the large 
stores of duplicates which all the older libraries contain. 

NEWSPAPER ACCESSIONS. 

The unusual growth of the newspaper branch of our library is a marked 
feature. Of the 5,986 volumes now in the library, 1,573 have been added 
during the past year. 

There are now being published in the ^tate 753 newspapers and periodi- 
cals, the regular issues of which are all being preserved in the library of 
this Society. It is the experience of all historical research in these days, 
that files of newspapers are the fountain-head of all exact data and infor- 
mation; a true reflection of the daily life of the communities in which they 
are published. When it is considered that this Society has gathered very 
full files of the earliest newspapers published in Kansas, and that within the 
last eleven years it has gathered all Kansas newspapers, and that its library 
now contains nearly complete files of all the papers published in the newer 
counties, it may be truly said that its work in this department is unparal- 
leled in the history of library-making. Never before was it attempted by 



10 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



MTWcietTor institution to completely save such records of the earliest 
hi«'t«r}' of 'the founding and growth of a new commonwealth. 

Th^ newspaper files are now every day consulted by the people of all 
portions of the State— for historical and political information, for legal 
notices and reports of public proceedings, and for the precise facts as to 
local occurrences of every nature. In most instances the early newspaper 
files <»f these counties have already disappeared from the localities in which 
they were published, and are nowhere else to be found except in our library. 
The labor attending the gathering in of these newspapers, and the amount of 
correspondence necessary to the securing of complete files, constitutes a 
very large part of the work of the Society; but it is undoubtedly the most 
valuable feature of its work. 

The grateful thanks of the Society are due to the thousand editors and 
publishers in this State who, unstiiitingly, and with constant expressions of 
interest in our work in making up this branch of our library, most gener- 
ously give the regular issues of their paper, and supply upon request all 
lacking numbers lost or mutilated in the mails. 

As regards the whole country, our accumulation of materials of historical 
information of this class has become very large. Of newspapers and period- 
icals published outside of the State, the Society is receiving the regular is- 
sues of one hundred and two. These are local newspapers of neighboring 
States and Territories, leading newspapers of the country, historical, scientific 
and other magazines, and |)eriodical publications of societies and institu- 
tions, all contributing to make up a library which shall contain a record of 
the history and progress of the country in all respects. 

A noteworthy portion of a gift of 97 volumes of newspaper files, made 
by the Boston Public Library, is that of 64 volumes of dates from 1767 to 
1830. This is a most rare and valuable contribution to our library of news- 
paper files, and goes largely to increase the richness of our collection in 
earlier dates in this most important branch of historical materials. The 
titles and dates of these files are set out in the appropriate list m this report. 

In this connection it is proper to mention that among the gifts made by 
Mr. Edmond M. Barton, of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, 
Ma«.. is a set of the files of the National Era, Washington, D. C, from 1851 
to 1854. These files cover the period of the agitation of the Kansas-Ne- 
braska question, and the beginning of the settlement of Kansas. They are 
very full of discussions and of information pertaining to the subject* and 
include many letters from Kansas, written in the latter part of the year 
1854. * ^ 

Included in a large contribution made by Dr. Samuel A. Green, of the 

Massachusetts Historical Society, are 109 volumes of the North American 

Review, between the years 1821 and 1867, chiefly of the earlier years of this 

invaluable publication. This gift makes it quite possible, with small ex- 

^ pense to the Society, to complete a set of this magazine. Dr. Green also gave 



Fifth biennial Repobt, 11 

with this contribution 35 volumes of the Christian Examiner, Boston, 1824 
to 1867, and 27 volumes of the Journal of the American Unitarian Associa- 
tion, 1854-1869. 

One of the most valuable and appropriate gifts in this department has 
been that made by Francis J. Garrison, of Koxbury, Mass., of 28 volumes 
of "The Liberator," William Lloyd Garrison's newspaper, for the years 
1833, 1838, and from 1840 to 1865, inclusive. The gift of this set of files is 
indicative of the general appreciation our Society has acquired as a receptacle 
for materials of the historyof the great struggle for human liberty and free 
government through which our country has passed, and in which Kansas 
acted so conspicuous a part. Garrison himself said of our Society, in its 
infancy : " The formation of such a society is cause for special congratula- 
tion, and an event of historical importance far beyond the limits of the 
State; for there is nothing more thrilling in American history than the 
struggle against 'Border-Ruffianism' (alias the Slave Power) to secure free- 
dom and free institutions to Kansas — a struggle which, if it had terminated 
otherwise than it did, would have been fraught with appalling consequences » 
not only to the State itself, but to the whole country, and postponed the 
abolition of the dreadful system of chattel slavery to an indefinite period." 
The gift of this set of "The Liberator" files by the son is in keeping with 
the just appreciation thus expressed by the father. 

One ot the largest gifts of newspaper files which the Society has ever re- 
ceived, has come during the past year from Hon. F. P. Baker, of Topeka, 
who has always been one of the most liberal contributors to the library. 
This gift consists of sixty-five bound volumes, almost wholly of Topeka news- 
papers, published between the years 1859 and 1885, many of them of the 
earlier years of this period. A statement of the titles and dates is set out in 
the appropriate list. 

Among other generous donors of newspaper files may be mentioned Dr. 
W. S. Baker of Topeka, Hon. R. S. Hick of Louisville, Mr. A. C. Waters 
of Chardon, Ohio, Mr. Wm. Tyrrell of Santa Cruz, California, and Dr. Geo. 
L. Beers of Topeka. Their gifts are enumerated in the appropriate list. 

MANUSCRIPTS. 

Among the manuscript accessions of interest which have been added to 
this class of historical materials which the Society possesses, may be men- 
tioned a gift made by Mr. Edward Byram, of Atchison county, of 711 pa- 
pers left by his grandfather, Rev. Jotham Meeker, the missionary to the 
Indians who set up the first printing press in Kansas. Mr. Meeker began 
printing in the spring of 1834, at thB^ Shawnee Baptist Mission, in what is 
now Johnson county, Kansas. He did a great deal of printing, chiefly in 
the Indian languages, for the use of missionaries of various denominations 
in their efforts to instruct the tribes of Indians which occupied that portion 
of the Indian Territory now in the limits of Kansas. His press was used 
for twenty years in this work, and up to the time when the settlement of 



12 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Kansas was b^un. The press was afterwards owned by the well-known 
Kansas editore, George W. Brown, S. S. Prouty, Samuel N. Wood, and Ed- 
win C. Manning. The manuscript papers relate to Mr. Meeker's missionary 
work, to his printing, and to incidents pertaining to life among the Indians 
in Michigan and^ Kansas, during a period of thirty years. 

A gift made by Hon. Edward L. Pierce.of Milton, Massachusetts, of thir- 
teen lettere written by citizens of Kansas to Senator Charles Sumner in 1854, 
1855, and 1856, is noteworthy. The letters relate to the exciting affairs in 
Kaiuas Territory during that period. Among the writers the names of J, 
B. McAfee, Samuel F.Tappan, Mrs. Hannah A. Ropes, Miss Lydia P. Hall, 
Charles Stearns and James F. Legate may be mentioned. 

Senat4>r John Sherman, of Ohio, has given the Society the original manu- 
script, written by him, of the remarkable report made by the Kansas Con- 
gressional Investigating Committee of 1856. He has also given the Society 
a scrap-book which he caused to be made for the use of the committee, which 
contains 135 broad pages of cuttings from the newspapers of that period, 
wholly relating to Kansas affairs. 

Hon. Frank H. Betton has given the Society some interesting manuscripts 
of Dr. Matthew Thornton, the signer of the Declaration of Independence* 
who was the donor's great-grandfather. 

In Noveml>er, 1885, Gen. Frank Reeder, of Easton, Pennsylvania, gave 
the Society an extract from a manuscript diary kept by his father, Gov. 
Andrew H. Reeder, during the period of his connection with the history of 
Kansas Territory. The extract includes dates from the 5th to the 23d of 
May, 1856, and is a record made by Governor Reeder of events immedi- 
ately precetling and during the time of his concealment and escape in dis- 
guise from the Territory through Missouri. This extract is included in the 

third volume of the Collections of the Society, published during the past 
year. 

PORTRAITS. 

Appropriately-framed portraits, nearly life size, of Col. Daniel H. Home 
and Dr. F. L. Crane, pioneers of Toi)eka; of William Lloyd Garrison, the 
Hfe-long advocate of the freedom of the slave; and of Senator John Sher- 
man, the eariy friend of Kansas, have been added to our gallery, the gift 
of the subjects of the portraits, or of their friends. A finely-executed, life- 
siie. oil.painted jwrtrait of ex-Governor John P. St. John has been given 
the Society by Mrs. St. John, being the sixth of the portraits of Kansas 
Governors now in our gallery. It was painted by Peter S. Noble, formerly 
Adjutant General of Kansas. The fine portrait of Governor John A. Mar- 
tni the present Governor of Kansas, which has just been placed in our 
gallery, ,« a gift to the Society from the Governor's associates in the execu- 
trve offices of the State. It was painted by the well-known artist, Selden J 

!^^T"* u """^'"'^ P^'^'^'^ *"^ «^^^«^ pictures besides have been 
Hiddcd to our collections, which are mentioned in the appropriate list. 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 13 

NEEDED ROOM. 

The library and collections of the Society have grown far beyond the 
accommodations for room given it in the State House. Provision should 
be made so that in the completion of the Capitol suitable and ample room 
shall be given the Society for many years to come. 

VOLUME OF COLLECTIONS. 

During the year the third volume of the Collections of the Society has 
been published, a volume of 519 pages. This contains the third and fourth 
biennial reports of the Society; the executive minutes kept in the offices of 
the first two Territorial Governors of Kansas, Governors Andrew H. Reeder 
and Wilson Shannon, during the terms of their official service, 1854-6, to- 
gether with brief biographical sketches of the two Governors ; an extract 
from Governor Reeder's diary, written during the period of his escape in 
disguise from Kansas in May, 1856 ; historical addresses of Governor James 
W. Denver and acting-Governor Frederick P. Stanton ; and the proceedings 
of the Quarter-Centennial Celebration, held in Topeka, January 29, 1886, 
under the auspices of the Society. 

CATALOGUING AND CLASSIFICATION. 

The Legislature, at the extra session, 1886, made an appropriation for the 
Society for extra clerk hire for indexing and cataloguing the library. The 
Board of Directors, in the application of this appropriation, have used it in 
the direction intended by the terms of the appropriation, but so far the 
expenditure has been chiefly in preliminary work. As a preparation for 
the work, it was necessary that the library should be classified, and the 
books and collections arranged in library system. The Society has always 
been short in its clerical force, and for two years previous to the taking ef- 
fect of this appropriation it had been deprived of half the clerical help 
which had been employed for the two years previous, the deficiency having 
been only partially supplied gratuitously. Hence, books, pamphlets, news- 
paper files, manuscripts, everything had necessarily been placed in defective 
system, or left unplaced. The work of the year thus far has therefore been 
largely devoted to that of disposing of accumulated work necessary to the 
placing of the library in systematic classification for cataloguing. Mean- 
time, largely augmented current accessions have proportionately increased 
the general work in the rooms of the Society. The issue from the press of 
our third volume of Collections, and the preparation of its very complete in- 
dex, also the preparation of the lists and papers contained in this Fifth Bi- 
ennial Report, have contributed to the burden of work during the past year. 

The system of classification which has been adopted is the decimal sys- 
tem, which has been brought to its present state of perfection by Mr. Mel- 
vil Dewey, Secretary of the American Library Association, and which is 
the system most widely employed in the more newly classified libraries of 
the country. The books are being placed on the shelves and numbered in 



14 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



accordance with this system, and the cataloguing of the library has been 
begun- upon a plan which refers to the number of every volume, pamphlet, 
and newspa|)er file, and to its place on the shelves in the library. This 
work is Hearing completion, and when completed the work of cataloguing 
will progress rapidly. Of the sum of $1,000, appropriated by the Legisla- 
ture for this work, the sum of $677.38 has been expended, leaving a bal- 
ance of $322.62. 

The Legislature should be asked to continue appropriations for this very 
importont work, and more ample compensation should be given the clerical 
force of the Society. It is meager and disproportionate to the pay given 
any other servants of the State. 

The following lists and tables give details of the work of the Society for 
the two years. 

PRINCIPAL BOOK ACCESSIONS. 

The following are classified lists, showing the principal accessions of books 
to the library during the two years : 

AGRicrLTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL. — Richthofcn's Cattle Raising on 
the Plains of North America; Missouri State Horticultural Society Re- 
ports; Reports of Kentucky Bureau of Agriculture; Reports of the Ohio 
Agricultural Experiment Station ; Reports of the Wisconsin Dairyman's 
Association; Pennsylvania Agricultural Reports; Michigan Horticultural 
Society Reports; Wisconsin Agricultural and Horticultural Reports. 

BiBLiociRAPHY. — Joseph T. Buckingham's Personal Recollections of 
Editorial Life; Ayer's Newspaper Annual, 1885; Caspar's Directory of 
Antiquarian Booksellers; Dewey's Decimal Classification ; Catalogue of the 
Cincinnati Public Library ; Catalogue of United States Government Pub- 
lications; Rowell's American Newspaper Directory, 1886; Our Press Gang, 
Wilmer; Catalogue of the American Antiquarian Society; Robert Clarke's 
Bibliotheca Americana; Catalogue of the Worcester, Massachusetts, Free 
Public Library; Allibone's Dictionary of British and American Authors; 
Maverick's Raymond and New York Journalism ; Hildeburn's Issues of the 
Press in Pennsylvania, 2 vols.; American Catalogue, 3 vols.; Catalogue of 
the Boston Atheneura, 5 vols. ; Catalogue of Bowdoin College Library. 

Biographical.— Life of Stephen A. Douglas; Washington, Schroeder's 
Maxims of; Life and Services of Gen. U. S. Grant, Remlap; Personal 
Memoirs of Gen. U. S. Grant, 2 vols. ; Coppee's Grant and His Campaigns ; 
Sanborn's Life and Letters of John Brown; Matlook's Life of Rev. Orange 
Scott; Life of Abraham Lincoln, Powers; Sargent's Life of Henry Clay; 
Tuckerman's Horatio Greenough ; Memoir of Commodore McComb, Rich- 
ard; Theodore Clapp's Autobiographical Sketches; Life and Travels of 
John Woolman; Bartlett's Life of Abraham Lincoln; Seward's Travels 
Around the World; Life and Works of Dr. Franklin; Life of John Paul 
.lon«; Hillg Memoir of Abbott Lawrence; Mackenzie's Biography of 
Stephen Decatur; Works of William E. Channing; William M. Paxton's 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 15 

Genealogy of the Marshall Family in Kentucky ; Memoir of Elijah P. Love- 
joy; Sargent's Life of Dr. Lewis F. Linn; Durrie's American Genealogies 
and Pedigrees; Life of Dr. Cotton Mather; Dr. McAnally's Life and Times 
of Samuel Patton ; Walker's Life of Oliver P. Morton ; Bartlett's Life of 
Franklin Pierce; Life and Speeches of Henry Clay; Jenkins's Life of 
Silas Wright; Cotton's Private Correspondence of Henry Clay; Carpen- 
ter's Six Months at the White House with Abraham Lincoln; Brown's 
Life of John A. Andrew; Memoirs of Wm. T. Sherman; Life of Rev. 
Morris Officer, Imhoff; Croffut & Morris's Diary of Thomas Robbins, of 
Norfolk, Conn.; Dr. Egle's Pennsylvania Genealogies; Parton's Life of 
Andrew Jackson, 3 vols.; Memorial and Genealogical Record of Paul 
Weitzel, Rev. E. H. Hayden; Palmer's Necrology of Harvard College 
Alumni ; Harvard College Memorial Biographies, Higginson ; Cooke's Life 
of Ralph W. Emerson; The Genius and Character of Emerson, F. B. San- 
born; Parton's Captains of Industry; Underwood's Sketch of James Rus- 
sell Lowell; Underwood's H. W. Longfellow; Our Great Benefactors, 
Samuel A. Drake; Phillips's Biographical Dictionary; Marvin's Life of 
William G. Caples. 

Church History. — Minutes of Philadelphia Baptist Association, 1707- 
1807; The Baptist Memorial, 1842-1851, vols. 1-10; Bird's Religion in the 
United States ; Emory's Episcopal Controversy Reviewed ; Raybold's An- 
nals of Methodism ; Webster's History of the Presbyterian Church ; Morris's 
Christian Life and Character of the Civil Institutions of the United States ; 
Theodore Parker's Views of Religion ; Bible, printed in Zurich, Switzer- 
land, in 1545 ; The Christian Examiner, vols. 1-18, 1824-1836, and 12 vols., 
1840-1867 — 30 volumes in all ; Rupp's History of Religious Denominations. 

Education. — Horace Mann's Lectures on Education; Philbrick's City 
School Systems ; Hittell's History of Culture ; Education in its Relations 
to Manual Industry ; Thoughts for Young Men, Horace Mann ; Manual 
Training, C. H. Ham ; Stetson's Problem of Negro Education ; The Home 
Library of Useful Knowledge ; Blake's Manual Training and Education; 
Hough's Historical Sketches of Colleges and Universities. 

History. — New Jersey Archives, vols. 8, 9, and 10; Works of Fisher 
Ames; Stone's Campaign of Burgoyne; Hildreth's History of the United 
States, 6 vols. ; Bowen's Sketch Book of Pennsylvania ; McMaster's His- 
tory of the People of the United States ; Carlton's New Hampshire; But- 
terfield's Journal of Captain Heart; Wilson's American History; Gille- 
land's History of the War of 1812; Spofford's New England Legends; 
Ramsey's Universal History, 9 vols.; Catalogue of Wisconsin Historical 
Society; Gordon's Gazetteer of New York; The Penn and Logan Corre- 
spondence; Sargent's History of Braddock's Expedition; Simms's History 
of South Carolina; Denny's Record of Upland, Pa.; Sanford's History of 
the United States before the Revolution ; Memoirs of the Historical Society 
of Pennsylvania ; Brinton's Notes of the Floridian Peninsula; Memoirs of 
the Antiquarian Society of France; Transactions of the Nebraska State 



l(j STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



Historical Society; Inple's Local Institutions of Virginia; Holcorab's Pen- 
sylvania Boroughs; Child's History of the United States ; Justin Winsor's 
History of America, vols. 2, 3, and 4; Dickson's New America; Brannan's 
History of the War of 1812; Niles's Revolution in America; Comstock's 
History of the Precious Metals; Headley's Chaplains and Clergy of the 
Revolution; White Slavery in the Barbary States, Charies Sumner; Nord- 
hoff's Cotton States in 1875; Hayes's History of the Trial of Charles 
Julius Guiteau; Peabody's Universal History; Collections of the New 
Hampshire Historical Society ; Egle and Linn's Pennsylvania in the War 
of the Revolution; Yonge's Constitutional History of England ; Drake's 
Making of New England; Ober's Young Folk's History of Mexico ; Irving 
Etting's Dutch Village Communities on the Hudson River; Papers of the 
American Historical Association, vol. 1. 

IndinM. — Diary of David Zeisberger among the Indians of Ohio ; Drake's 
Indian Captivities; Patterson's Life of Black Hawk; Schoolcraft's Myth of 
Hiawatha; Schoolcraft's Thirty Years' Residence among the Indians of 
North America; Schoolcraft's Archives of Aboriginal Knowledge, 6 vols.; 
Wright's American Negotiator; Hanson's Lost Prince; Hubbard's Life of 
Red Jacket and His People; Hough's Indian Treaties; Cremonj's Life 
among the Apaches; Reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 28 vols., 
183.'>-1870; Condition of the Indian Tribes, 1865; Catlin's Illustrations of 
the Manners, Customs, (fee, of the North American Indians. 

Kansas Books, or by Kansas Authors. — Edwards's Atlas of Cloud 
County, Kansas, 1885; Poetical Works of John P. Campbell; Dudley Has- 
kell, Memorial Addresses; Poems of Mrs. Ellen P. Allerton; Spring's His- 
tor>' of Kansas; Sage's Wild Scenes in Kansas and Nebraska; Picard's 
Mission Flower; Picard's Matter of Taste; Rhymes of Ironquill; Sister 
Ridnour's Sacrifice, Mrs. C. E. Wilder; Howe's Mystery of the Locks; 
Sketch of the Life of the Grim Chieftain, James H. Lane; The Rocks of 
Kansas, Swallow and Hawn; Goss's Revised Catalogue of the Birds of 
Kansas; Polk's Gazetteer of Kansas, 1886-87; The Story of a Ranch, Alice 
W. Rollins; We Two in Europe, Mary L. Ninde; Wilder's Annals of Kan- 
Ms. 1886; Thirty Years in Topeka, F. W. Giles; Queen Sylvia and other 
Poems, John P. Campbell ; Howe's Moonlight Boy ; Ebbutt's Emigrant Life 
in Kansas; Bishop Vail's Comprehensive Church ; Coburn's Swine Husbandry; 
Rev. Adinijah and His Wife's Relations, Mrs. L. A. B. Steele. 

Ma<»azini-».— Scribner's Monthly Magazine, 15 vols.; Century Maga- 
zine, 7 vols.; Dial, Chicago, 6 vols.; North American Review, 122 vols.; 
Atlantic Monthly, 50 vols.; Popular Science Monthly, 27 vols.; Weekly 
AUgazine. Chicago; The Missionary Herald, 48; Overland Monthly; 
(^uarteriy Journal of Inebriety, 2; Kendall's Expositor, 1; Catalogue U. 
>. Government Publications, 2; American Antiquarian, 2; Brown & Hol- 
land s Shorthand Monthly, 2; The Western Plowman, 2; The Unitarian, 1 ; 
The M.lUtone and The Com Miller, 2; The Iowa Historical Record, 2; 
>..nn...... Bivouac, 1; The Missionary Herald, 63 ; Christian Examiner, 31 ; 



Fifth Biennial Repob't. 17 

Journal of the American Unitarian Association, 14; Boston Journal of 
Chemistry, 4 ; The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 2 ; 
Harvard University Bulletin, 1 ; The Popular Science News, 2 ; Science, 
Cambridge and New York, 4; The Unitarian Review and Religious Mag- 
azine, 2; Political Science Quarterly, 1 ; The Western Journal and Civilian, 
St. Louis, 1848 to 1854, 11 ; The Kansas City Medical Index, 3 ; The Journal 
of American Orthoepy, 2; The Home Missionary, 2; Harper's Monthly 
Magazine, 8; Putnam's Monthly, 2; The Galaxy, 24; The Library Journal, 
2 ; The Magazine of American History, 4 ; The Sheltering Arms, 2 ; The 
Publisher's Weekly, 4; The American Missionary, 2; Phonetic Educator, 
1 ; The Student's Journal, (phonographic,) 2 ; Magazine of Western History, 
4; Historical Register, Harrisburg, Pa., 2; The Woman's Magazine, 2; 
Bulletin _de la Societe de Geographic, Paris, 2; Chronique de la Societe des 
Gens de Lettres, Paris, 2. 

Missions. — Annual Reports of American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions; Missionary Herald, 1821-1884, 63 vols.; Moss's Annals 
of the U. S. Christian Commission ; Bang's History of Methodist Missions ; 
Pitzel's Lights and Shades of Missionary Life; Kipp's Early Jesuit Mis- 
sions'; Tracey's History of the A. B. C. F. M.; Green's History of Presby- 
terian Missions ; Reports of American Bible Society ; Holmes's Missions of 
the United Brethren ; History of Indian Missions on the Pacific Coast. 

MoRMONiSM. — Tucker's Mormonism; Spaulding's Manuscript Found, 
Book of Mormon; Female Life Among the Mormons; the Mormons or 
Latter-Day Saints ; Tell It All : a Woman's Life in Polygamy, Stenhouse. 

Political and Documentary. — Houghton's History of American Pol- 
itics; U. S. Consular Reports, Labor in Foreign Countries, 3 vols.; Cong- 
don's Tribune Essays; Martin's Secret Proceedings of the Constitutional 
Convention of 1787; Annals of Congress, 1789-1824, 17 vols.; Register of 
Debates in Congress, 1824-1837, 29 vols.; Congressional Globe, 1833-1872, 
74 vols.; Congressional Record, 42 vols.; Gerrit Smith's Speeches in 
Congress; Nimmo's Internal Commerce of the United States; Public 
Documents of the U. S., Ingalls's gift, 222 vols. ; History of the Ameri- 
can Party; Sanderson's Republican Landmarks; Greeley and Cleveland's 
Political Text Book, 1860; Griffin's Progress of the Working Classes; 
U. S. Consular Reports, 1885-1886; Richardson's Standard Silver Dollar; 
Ford's Standard Dollar; Reports of the Secretary of the U. S. Treas- 
ury, 1885; Poore's Congressional Directory, 49th Congress; Potter's 
Political Economy; Smithsonian Annual Report, 1884; John Adams's De- 
fence of the Constitution of the United States ; Report of the United States 
Fish Commissioner, 1883 ; Moore's Picturesque Washington ; Three Decades 
of Federal Legislation, S. S. Cox; McPherson's Hand-Book of Politics; 
Benton's Abridgment of Debates, 16 vols.; American Archives, 2 vols.; 
Patent Office Reports, 27 vols.; Hoyt's Protection versus Free Trade; 
Brice's Financial Catechism; Reports of U. S. Bureau of Statistics. 



jg STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Rebellion. Books Relating to the War of the.- Official Records 
of the War of the Rebellion, vols. 11-15, 7 vols, aud parts; Life and Ser- 
vices of Ellsworth. Lvon and Baker ; Fry's New York and the Conscription 
of 1863 ; OlCn) vd's Soldier's Story of the Siege of Vicksburg ; Gulp's Twenty- 
fifth Ohio Infantry; U. S. Tactics for Colored Troops; Schenck's History 
of the Burning of Chambersburg, Pa.; Battle Fields of the South; Narra- 
tive of Suffering; Quint's The Potomac and the Rapidan ; Army Notes; Cas- 
tleman's Army of the Potomac ; Fitzhugh's Sociology for the South ; Pyne's 
Histor)- of the First New Jersey Cavalry; John Austin Stevens's History 
of the Union Defence Committee of the City of New York; Craven's Prison 
Life of Jefferson Davis; Stille's History of the U. S. Sanitary Commission; 
The Fight for Missouri ; McElroy's Andersonville Prison ; The Cruise of the 
Alabama and the Sumter, Semmes; Pike's Prostrate State, South Carolina 
under Negro Government; Gilson's Journal of Army Life; Prison Life in 
the Tobacco Warehouse in Richmond, Wm. C. Harris; Jessie Benton Fre- 
mont's Story of the Guard ; Richardson's Field, Dungeon and Escape ; 
Moore's Anecdotes, Poetry and Incidents of the War; Moore's Women of 
the War; Henry J. Raymond's Letters on Disunion and Slavery; Joshua 
R. Giddings's Florida Exiles ; The Great Conspiracy, Its t)rigin and History, 
John A. Logan ; The Military and Civil History of Connecticut during the 
War of the Rebellion ; Paul's History of Pennsylvania Soldiers' Orphans' ' 
School; Boynton's History of the U. S. Navy during the Rebellion. 

Science. — Hayden's Geological and Geographical Atlas of Colorado; 
Kiugsley's Standard Natural History, 5 vols. ; Hitchcock's Religion of Geol- 
ogy; Fourth Annual Report of the United States Geographical Survey, 
Powell; U. S. Geographical Survey and Mineral Resources, 1883-4; Fifth 
Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey; McClu re's Obser- 
vations upon Geology of the U. S.; U. S. Geological Survey, vol. 9, Powell ; 
Turnbull's History of the Magnetic Telegraph; Mullaly's Account of the 
Laying of the Telegraphic Cable; Third Annual Report of the Bureau of 
Ethnology, Powell. 

Slavery. Books Relating to.— Moore's Notes on Slavery in Massa- 
chusetts; Legion of Liberty — American Anti-Slavery Society; Carey's 
Slave Trade; Brown's Plea for Industrial Education Among Colored Peo- 
ple; Paine's Six Years in a Georgia Prison ; Lovejoy's Memoirs of Torrey ; 
Fred Douglass's Narrative of an American Slave, 1847 ; Longstreet's Geor- 
gia Scenes; Horace Greeley's History of the Struggle for Slavery Exten- 
sion; Theodore Welb's American Slavery as It Is; Poole's Anti-Slavery 
■ ions Before the Year 1800; Stebbins's American Colonization Society ; 
id's Laws Relating to Slavery; Goodell's American Slave Trade; 
American SUvery as It Is; Parker Pillsbury's Acts of the Anti-Slavery 
Apostles; Elizur Wright's Life of Myron Holley; The Life of William 
Lloyd Garrison; Bimey's The American Churches the Bulwark of Amer- 
ican Slavery; Williams's History of the Negro Race in America; The Im- 
pending Crisis, Helper; Personal Memoirs of Daniel Drayton; Geo. W 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 19 

Clark's Liberty Minstrel, 1846; The Liberty Bell, 1849; Henry Wilson's 
Anti-Slavery Methods in Congress, 1861-1865; Life of Benjamin Lundy; 
May's Recollections of the Anti-Slavery Conflict ; Peter Cooper's Letter on 
Slave Emancipation ; A History of African Colonization, Archibald Alex- 
ander ; The Wrong of Slavery, Robert Dale Owen ; Sherman's Slavery in 
the United States. 

Society, Labor, Health, Charities. — Report of Illinois Bureau of 
Labor Statistics, 1884; Tennessee State Board of Health Reports; Reports 
Illinois Board of Charities; Massachusetts Board of Health Reports; Sib- 
ley's Harvard Graduate Reports ; Reports California Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics; Annual Reports of the Massachusetts Bureau of Labor Statistics; 
Connecticut Labor Report ; Michigan Reports of Labor ^atistics ; Reports 
of New Jersey Bureau of Labor Statistics ; Reports of Indiana Bureau of 
Statistics ; Reports of New York Bureau of Labor Statistics ; Reports of the " 
Pennsylvania Bureau of Industrial Statistics ; Report of the Missouri Bureau 
of Labor Statistics; Reports of the National Board of Health, 1880-1885; 
Report of United States Labor Commissioner ; The Labor Question, H. H. 
Young ; Reports of the Iowa State Board of Health ; Reports of the Illinois 
State Board of Health ; Reports of the Louisiana State Board of Health ; 
Reports of the New York State Board of Health ; Reports of the Massa- 
chusetts State Board of Health ; Reports of the Michigan State Board of 
Health; Reports of the Tennessee State Board of Health; Maine Board 
of Health Reports ; Proceedings of the National Conference of Charities. 

Social and Industrial. — Mayor Courtenay's Year Books of Charleston, 
South Carolina; Digest of the Laws of the Grange; Edward E* Hale's 
Working Men's Homes ; The Woman Question in Europe, Theodore Stan- 
ton; Howe's Winter Home for Invalids; Proceedings of the National 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry ; The Fishers and Fisher Industries of the 
United States, George E. Good ; Warner's Industries of Massachusetts ; 
Lesley's Iron Manufacturer's Guide ; The Science of Society, Stephen Pearl 
Andrews ; Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Free-Masonry ; Ely's Recent American 
Socialism; History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 3, Stanton, Anthony and Gage. 

Temperance. — Jutkin's Hand-Book of Prohibition; Hastings — The 
People Against the Liquor Traffic; Gail Hamilton's Prohibition in Politics ; 
Andrew's Errors of Prohibition; One Hundred Years of Temperance, J. 
H. Stearns. 

Travels in America. — Murray's Discoveries and Travels in North 
America ; Duncan's Travels Through a Part of the United States ; Basil 
Hall's Travels in North America; John Ross's Second Voyage to the New 
Continent ; Stephens's Travels in Central America ; L. Maria Child's Letters 
from New York ; Ray's Polar Expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska ; Cor- 
thell's Inter-Oceanic Problem ; Herndon's Valley of the Amazon ; Parry's 
Journal, Discovery of the Northwest Passage ; Hayes's Arctic Boat Jour- 
ney, 1854; Sarah J. Hale's Northwood, or Life North and South. 



20 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



The West, Books Relating to.— Hildredth's Pioneer History of the 
OhioVallevan.l the Northwest Territory ; Bond's Minnesota and Its Re- 
wmrcee; Bromwell's History of Emigration; Bayard Taylor's Eldorado; 
C'onneirs Western Characters, or Types of Border Life; Powell's Contribu- 
tions to North American Ethnology, vol. 6 ; Hayden's U. S. Geological Sur- 
veys, vol. 8; Williams's History of St. Paul, Minnesota ; Hall and Whitney's 
Geological Survey of Wisconsin; Farmer's History of Detroit, Michigan ; 
Darby '."^ Personal Recollections of St. Louis and Missouri; Hittell's Adven- 
tures of James Adams, of California; Ritch's Illustrated New Mexico; 
Prince's Historical Sketches of New Mexico; Northrop's Pioneer History 
of Medina County, Ohio; Teetor's Mill Creek Valley, Ohio; Miss Allen's 
Ten Years in Oregon ; Shepherd's Prairie Experiences in Handling Cattle 
and Sheep; Bisliop's First Years of Minnesota; Johnson's California and 
Oregon; Palmer's California and India; Margaret Fuller's Summer on the 
Lakes; Travels in the Interior of North America; The Missouri River, far 
up, in the Years 1832-34, Maximilian Prinz zu wied, 2 vols., quarto, with folio 
of 48 plates; King's Copper- Bearing Rocks of Lake Superior; Poems of 
Albert Pike; Burchard's Production of Gold and Silver; Du Mont's His- 
tory of Louisiana Territory; Bossu's Travels Through Louisiana Territory ; 
Bradbury's Travels Through the Interior of North America; French's His- 
torical Collections of Louisiana Territory ; Nicolet's Discovery of the North- 
west; Hollister's Mines of Colorado; Heap's Central Route to the Pacific; 
Brayman's Information About Texas ; Mary A. Holly's Texas ; Frost's His- 
tory of California; Buffum's Gold Mines of California; Wood's Gold Dig- 
gings of California; Bushnell's Iowa Resources and Industries; Bishop 
Robertson's Louisiana Territory ; Speed's AVilderness Road to Kentucky ; 
Bartlett's Texas, New Mexico and California; A Family Flight Through 
Mexico and Kansas, E. E. and Susan Hale ; Scharf 's History of St. Louis, 
Missouri, 3 vols.; Olmstead's Journey in the Back Country; Cist's Cincin- 
nati in 1859; Scott's Nebraska Resources and Advantages; McRae's Pro- 
ducts and Resources of Arkansas ; Proceedings of the Davenport, Iowa, 
Academy of Science; lugersoll's Crest of the Continent; Dragoon Cam- 
paigns to the Rocky Mountains; Arnold's Poets and Poetry of Minnesota; 
Robinson's Mexico and Her Military Chieftains; Woodman's Texas Guide to 
Emigrants ; Jones's History of the Republic of Texas ; Bowles's Across the 
Continent ; Dunbar's Discovery of Gold in California ; Capron's History 
of California; a>ffin'8 Seat of Empire; Peck's Gazetteer of Illinois; Mil- 
burn's Pioneer Preachers and People of the Mississippi Valley; David 
Crockett's Tour; Fossett's Colorado, Its Gold and Silver Mines; Emory's 
New Mexico and California ; Ober's Mexican Resources ; Camels for Mili- 
tary Purposes on the Plains, Report of Secretary of War, 1857 ; McCracken's 
Michigan, History, Resources, etc.;. Raymond's Mineral Resources of the 
States and Territories West of the Rocky Mountains; Owen's Geological 
Survey of Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota; Official State Atlas of Nebraska; 
History of Clear Creek and Boulder Valleys, Colorado; Margry, Memoirs 



Fifth Biennial Mepobt. 



21 



and Documents Kelating to French Discoveries in America, from 1614 to 
1754, 4 vols.; Bonham's Fifty Years Recollections of Illinois; Lands- 
downe's Canadian Northwest ; Tanner's Successful Emigration to Canada ; 
Gayarre's Louisiana; Imlay's Topographical Description of the Western 
Territories of North America; Reports on Pacific Railway Survey, 1860; 
Emory's Mexican Boundary Report, 3 vols. ; Western Journal of Civiliza- 
tion, St. Louis, 1848 to 1854, 10 vols. ; Schoolcraft's Exploring Expedition 
to the Sources of the Missouri ; Wetmore's Gazetteer of Missouri. 

DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS. 



Donors. 



Books. Pamp 



Abbott, James B., DeSoto 

Abrams, A. D., Council Grove 

Academic de Macon, Macon, France .. 

Academic des Sciences, Arts, et Belles-Lettres, Dijon, France 

Academy of Natural Science, Davenport, la 

Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, Pa 

Adams, F. G , Topeka 

Adams, Mrs. F. G., Topeka 

Adams, Hally, Topeka 

Adams, H, C, St. Joseph, Mo 

Adams, H. J., Topeka 

Agriculture, Commissioner of, Ottawa, Canada 

Akins, Frank, Newton 

Alden, John B., New York city 

Aldrich, Charles W., Washington 

Alexander, Rev. W. S., New Orleans, La 

Allen, Hon. E. B., Topeka 

Allerton, Mrs. E. P., Hamlin 

Allyn, Rev. Robert, Carbondale , i 

Almond, L. C, Kingman 

Alrich, L. L., Sec, Cawker City 

Alward, Rev. E., Wathena 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass 

American Archaeological Society of Rome, Rome, Italy , 

American Association for the Advancement of Science '. 

American Bell Telephone Co., Boston, Mass 

American Bible Society, New York city 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Boston, Mass., 

American Museum of Natural History, New York city 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa 

American Unitarian Association, Boston, Mass 

Anderson, Hon. John A., Manhattan 

Anderson, Wiley, Fort Scott 

Andrews, Rev. Dr. Israel W., Marietta, 

Anthony, Susan B., Rochester, N. Y 

Archibald, Dr. 0. W., Jamestown, Dakota 

Atchison, Andrew, Dunlap , 

Atherton, George W., Harrisburg, Pa 

Axline & McNeal, Medicine Lodge 

Ayer, N. W. & Son, Philadelphia 

Babbitt, Clinton, Madison, Wis 

Babcock, H. A., Lincoln, Neb 

Bachelder, N. J., Andover, N. H 

Badger, Joseph E., jr., Frankfort 

Baker, Frank J,, Clay Center , 

Baker, F. P., Topeka 

Baker, N. R.. Topeka .' 

Baldwin, James E., Zanesville, , 

Baldwin, Wm. H., President, Boston, Mass 

Ballard, Harlan H., Lenox, Mass 

Ball, Mrs. Bell, Topeka 

Barnes, J. S., Phillipsburg 

Barnes, J. S., Pratt 

Barren, J. A., Paris, France ^ 

Bartlett, J. R., Washington, D. C 

Barteldes, E., Lawrence 

Bates, D. H., New York city 

Bates, H. T., Sec, Paola 

Battell, Robbins and Miss A., Norfolk, Conn , 

Beadle & Adams, New York city 

Bean, Dr. J. V., Sec, Howard 

Bebb, T. D., Oberlin 

Betton, Hon. Frank H., Topeka 

Betts, E. C, Auburn, Ala 



387 
1 



51 



22 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS — Continded. 



Doncrt. 



BUhop. O. S.. Huron, D. T 

Bl««>n t I -«t. i>hitli|i«burg 

BUck 

Black iirg ~ 

Blair, i: .. W'lulhlngtbn, D.C 

BUke»l«jr, Kev. Linus, Topekk. 

Bond. 8, A. <•., Secretary, Boston, Mass 

Boobain. Jeriab, Peoria, 111 

Boston Board of Heallh, Boston, Moss 

Boston <h«rital>lc A»»i>ciatlon, Itoston, Mass 

Bocton Public Library, KoMon, Mass., Arthur Knapp, Assistant Librarian. 

Beaton Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Boston, Mass 

Boatooian Society, H<»ton. Mass 

Bootwell. F. M., Uroton, Mass 

Bowdoln College, Kninswick, Me 

Bowes. <ieo. \V., Topeka ; 

Brackett.C C, lawrence 

Bndbory. Wm. 1!., Topeka , 

Bnden, Dr. J., Nashville, Tenn , 

Bradford, Hon. S. B., Topeka j 

Bradlee, Rct. C, D., Itoston, Mass 

BrandleT, Henry, Mattield Green ^ 

Brelsb, J. F., Topeka 




Brewers' Association, U. S., New York city 

Brioe, Dr. S. M., Mound city 

Brown, A. N., Librarian U. S. Naval Academy, Baltimore, Md. 

Brown, II. E., Oberlin, O 

Brown, L. C, Nickerson 

Back, A. J., Oskaloosa 

Buck, Dr. J. F.. Toj^ka 

Buffalo, N. Y., HUtorical Society 

Burgees, (Jllbert A., Pratt Co , 

Burnett. H. C, Santa F^ N. M 

Burnier, C. D., Crete, Nob , 

Busbell, Wm., Camden, N. J 

Butler Hospital for Insane, Providence, R. I 

Butler, I»rof. J. I)., Madison, Wis , 

Butler, J. M.. Coffey ville 

Butler, T. A., Lyons 

Butler, Mrs. T. A., Lyons , 

California Bureau of Labor .Statistics, Sacramento '. 

California, University of, Berkeley, Cal 

Campbell, Col. A. B., Toi)eka 

Campbell, Geo. E., Wichita 

Campbell, J. P., Abilene l^'.Z".'.'' 

CMnpbell, Samuel .»<., itoston. Mass 

Campbell, W. P., Westmoreland '.[ ' 

Canadian Institute, Toronto 

<'arr, E. T., Ix>avciiworth .""V 

Carr. .*<. C. Milton Junction, Wis.... 

Carson i»r 

Caae. S 

Caaai'l 

ch»-l- 



65 



'vracuse, N. Y """*""i"/.i!!"".'."."."!!!.*.'.'."*."!!!'.".*! 

'ieiphiiipi.V.V.\\".V.V."V.*.\"V.".""!!.\"3^^ 

-, Neb 

II. W Columbus. 



i itor of, Norton ".!.'.'"*"!!!*.*.!". 

l'.-.^t..ri Ma,g .......*..".*.'...*."*.."*.'.*.' 

'a<ielphla. Pa .!!!...!!.'."*.'.'.'.'.""!."'!! • 

y, Chicago, 111 „ .".'."!!!."*."*.'."." 



•»piul, Itoston, Mass 

"^4? M*^ ^''^ Children of the Destitute,* Boston,' 

. Phila<Uli)hia, Pa 

■ Miral History ...".7..!..7....*.*. ''.!.'"' 

V York city ;.";; 



I ». , Secret ary ,' Ne w York city." ".!!! !!!!! 



>, Cincinnati, O 

' . N. Y.„ 

Mass 



, >N anhinirton, D. C 

rietta, Ohio „., 



" :i.rik;«lt.,t,al 1,1), ,, ]vjjgg 

Couk. Geo. II . New Brunswick N J ^' "^^""^ 

, J. v., Barllngton „,...'. 



2 


1 


1 


14 


.... 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 





Fifth biennial Repobt. 



23 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS — Continued. 



Donors. 



Pamp 



Copp, H. N., Washington, D. C 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y 

Corthell, E. L., New York city 

Cotton Exposition, Louisiana, State Commissioners 

Courtenay, Hon. W. A., Charleston, S. C 

Coutant, C. C, Garden City 

Cragin, F. W., Topeka 

Crandall, C. D., Kansas City, Mo 

Crane, Geo., Brookfield, Vt ^ 

Crane, Geo. W., Topeka 

Crawford, Gov. S. J., Topeka 

Culbertson, J., Albilene 

Culp, E. C, Salina 

Cummins, Scott, Canema 

Cunningham, H. S., Salina 

Cunningham, R. W., Lawrence 

Dakota University, Vermillion, D. T 

Darling, Gen. G. W., Utica, N. Y 

Davis, Charles S., Junction City 

Davis, John & Sons, Junction City 

Davis, John F., Frankfort, Ky 

Davis, M. W., Iowa City, Iowa 

Deaf Mutes, Institute for Improved Instruction of. New York city , 

DeGeer, Mrs. M. E., Garden City 

DeMoisy, Charles, Fort Scott 

Dennis, H. J., State Librarian, Topeka 

Dillon, M. F., Topeka 

Dinsmore, J. W., Hanover 

Dodge, S. H., Beloit 

Dorr, Dalton, Philadelphia, Pa 

Dougherty, G. E., Downs 

Dow, Charles A., Hartford 

Drake, A. W., Century Company, New York city 

Draper, .lames, Worcester, Mass 

Drum, Gen. R. C, Washington, D. C 

Dunbar, Prof. J. B., Bloomfield, N. J 

Dury, Charles, Cincinnati, O 

Dury, Mrs. Louisa M., Avondale, Cincinnati, 

Eads, James B., New York city .' 

Eastman, Dr. B. D., Topeka 

Eaton, Gov. B. H., Denver, Col 

Edgar, Geo. M., Fayettesville, Ark 

Edge, Thomas J., Harrisburg, Pa 

Egle, Dr. W. H., Harrisburg, Pa 

Elliott, L. R., Manhattan 

Emery, Frank E., Mountainville, N. Y 

Ensign, Dr. H. A., Newton 

Ensign, Edgar T., Denver, Col 

Ervine, Rev. S. B., Lecomptou 

Ewing, Mrs. Emma P., Ames, la 

Failyer, G. H., Manhattan 

Fairchild, Pres't George T., Manhattan„ 

Farley, Rev. J, T., Burr Oak 

Farnham, Geo. L., Lincoln, Neb 

Faulkner, Hon. Charles, Salina 

Fee, J. W., Parsons 

Fernow, B. E., New York city 

Files, A. W., Little Rock, Ark 

Filley, C. E. Burlingame 

Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn 

Foote, Dr. S. L., Lebo 

Forde, E. M., Emporia 

Foster, Charles A., Quincy, Mass 

Foster, W. E., New York city 

Fowler, C. W., Kansas City, Mo .'. 

Franklin, Commodore S. R., Washington 

French Canadian Institute, Ottawa, Canada 

Frye, F. W. & Bro., Parsons 

Funk, J. J., Peabody 

Funston, Hon. E. H., Carlisle , 

Garver, J. N., Emporia „.. 

Gaskell,G. A., Chicago, 111 

Gass, H. T., Flint, Mich 

Gatschet, A. S., Washington, D. C 

Gay, Frank B., Hartford, Conn 

Gemmell, R. B., Topeka 

George, Rev. A. P., Speareville , 

Gill, Geo. B., Sumner county , , 

Gillispie, J. A., Omaha, Neb 

Gilmore, John S., Fredonia 



24 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS— Continued. 



Domon. 



Goodman, L. A., Wertport, Mo 

Goodnow. Prof. I. T., .ManhattsD 

iUm. Col. N. S.. Topeka. 

GraAon, J. J., Ionia, Mich - 

(irabtiii, -\. A., Coluinbiis, O 

(irabatu. Prof. I. I> , .MunhatUn 

(trabani. W. O.. Harper ~ 

(iraT««. Marr H., Chicago, HI...: ••• 

Gr»«o. Dr. .Samuel A., SecreUrr of the Mass. Historical Society, Boston, Mass. 

(irc«n, Samuel S., Worcester, Mass 

Greeoe, H. .M., Ijurreoco 

Grorw. Mlsa Lillle, Atchison 

Guild, E. B., Topeka 

Golbric, I'. >L, Adjutant General, Harrisburg, Pa 

Hadler, Arthur T., Hartford, Conn 

Haffanian. J. .M. A Sons, Concordia 

Half . ( k-orKc D., Topeka. 



Books. 



Pomp 



127 



Hall. I). .M.. Sec., Bangor, Me 

Hamblin, T. ¥., Ottawa 

Harper Library Association, Harper 

Harrington, Grant W., I^iwrence 

Harvnrd rniven<itr, Canibrid^'e, .Mass 

Haworth, Mrs. Elizabeth I'., olathe 

Hayden. Kev. Horace Fkiwin, Wilkesbarre, Pa 

Hendj, Rer. J. F., Emporia 

Herald. .Salina 

Hayvood, Mrs. .Maud, (irecncastle, Mo 

Hiawatha Boanl of {■>lucation, Hiawatha 

Higbee, E. E., Harrisburg, Pa 

HIgglns, I.. L., Topeka 

Highland Cniverslty, Highland , 

Hin, Wm.St. Ix)ui8, .Mo 

Htoman, I*. M., Denver, Col 

Hlnrichs, Dr. Gustarus, Iowa City, la 

Histnriral and rhilosophlcal Society of Ohio, Cincinnati 

Hoadley, Charles J., Hartford, Conn 

Hodpon, Rev. T., S«wanee, Tenn 

Hoffman, Rev. U. .\., l>own8 , 

Hoceboom, Dr. Geo. \V., Topeka .'. 

Holman, ReT. C, North Toi>eka , 

Holt, Rev. L. H..Toi)eka 

Horace Mann School for Deaf .Mutes, Bostort, Mass 

Horton, Hon. Albert li., Topeka 

Hooper, S. K., Denver, Col \ 

Hoofier, Prest. W. W., Molly Springs, .Mass 

Horn.r, .Mim Hatlle. Hoiden 

Houghton, .MIlHin A Co., lioston, Mass 

Howart), ueo. E.. Lincoln, Neb ."„' 

Howe, Hon. Samuel T.,To[>eka 

Iloyt, Rev, A. K., New Orleans, La 

Hoxle. H. M.,St. IvOuU, .Mo " ' 

HubbanI, L. P., New York city ^.... ' "* ■ 

Hub»>«.|l. W. O., Uwrence 

ilulbert, K. W„Sec.. Fort .Scott '..'..'.'.'". 

Hullntf, A. s., Tojieka 

Hutihlnn, E R., I>es .Moines, la 

Huxley, H. E., Neenah, Wl» 

Illinoia Hoard of « haritles, .Springfield, III 

Illinois Itoanl of Health. Springfield 

Illinois itureau of I>alior Statistics 

Indian Rights AMociatlon, Phlladelphla.Pa!!'.'.".'..'." 

Indiana lk«ni of stallMics, Indianapolis .*..*.*."' 

iDd ana Historical Society. Indianapolis 

Indiana state Boanl of Health, Indianapolis 

lodustrial Uague, I'hlla«lelphin, Pa .„ 

Iniralls. Hon. John J., Atchison 

IngerMll. Prert, C, L, Ft. Collins, Col ".'.".".'.'.' 

Iowa City ".!"*.!'"*.'. 

nt of Public Instruct ion, Des Moines. 



1 
451 



Iowa HiMorical Socletr 

Iowa SI 

Jay 



Jenki 

Jenk- 

JeroK 

John^ 

John 

Joneo 

Jone>, 

IU1I"< 



in , 

. D.T. 



Baltimore, Md. 



Neb. 



BUtoTaaclwn' AaMeUtlon, Topeka.-VT ....!!..!.,....! 



FIFTH BIENNIAL REPOBT. 



25 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS— Continued. 



Donors. 



Kellerman, Prof. W. A., Manhattan.... 

Kellogg, A. N. & Co., Kansas City 

Kellogg, Dr. J. H., Battle Creek, Mich. 

Kenea & Lane, La Cygne 

Kennedy, Dr. J. F., Des Moines, la 




Kennedy, R. T., Mexia, Texas 

Kent, H.R., Topeka 

Kentucky Deaf Mute Institute, Frankfort. 

Kerlin, Dr. Isaac N., Elwyn, Pa 

Kimball, James P., Washington, D. C 

Kimball, John C, Hartford, Conn. 



Kimball, Sumner J., General Superintendent, Washington, D. C. 
Kinne, E. A., Cottonwood Falls 



Knapp, Dr. A. H., Osawatomie 

Knaus, Warren, Salina 

Knox, Rev. J. D., Topeka 

Knox, M. V. B., Littleton, N. H 

Knudsen, C. W., Norwalk, Conn 

Kochlitzky, Oscar, Jefferson City, Mo 

Kretsinger, D. L., Winfield 

Krimble, John, Secretary, Washington, D. C 

Lane, Ed. C, LaCygne 

Langworthy, Rev. I. P., Boston, Mass 

Latour, Major L. A. H., Montreal, Canada 

Lattimer, J. W., Pleasanton 

Lawhead, Hon. J. H., Topeka 

Lawrence, C. H., Secretary, Hiawatha 

Lazenby, W. R., Columbus, Ohio 

Leavenworth, Mrs. Jennie C, University of Virginia. 

Lemmon, A. B., Newton 

Leue, Adolphe, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Levsey, W., State Treasurer, Harrisburg, Pa 

Lilley, George, Brookings, Dakota 

Lindsley, Dr. J. B., Nashville, Tenn 

Lippincott, Dr. J. A., Lawrence 

Longfellow Memorial Association, Cambridge, Mass... 

Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, N. Y 

McCabe, Hon. E. P., Topeka 

McCamant, Joel B., Harrisburg, Pa 

McFarlane, Rev. Daniel, St. Marys 

McCash, I. N., Lyons 

MacGregor, Duncan, Chicago 

McLachlin, H. M., Paola 

Mcllravy, E. L., Lawrence 

McVicar, Dr. Peter, Topeka 

Magee, R., Eskridge 

Maimonides Library, New York city 

Maine State Board of Health, Augusta 

Maloy, John, Council Grove 

Manchester, Rev. Alfred, Providence, R. I 

Manning, Robert, Boston, Mass 

Marcus, Alfred A., Boston, Mass 

Martin, Geo. W., Junction City 

Martin, Gov. John A., Topeka 

Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Mass... 

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 

Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Boston 

Massachusetts Soldiers' Home, Chelsea , 

Massachusetts State Board of Health, Boston 

Mathewson, H. P., Lincoln, Neb 

Maxson, P. B., Emporia '. 

Maxwell, M. M., Valley Falls 

Maxwell, Mrs. S. B., Des Moines, Iowa 

Merrill, Chester W., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Michigan Board of Health, Lansing 

Michigan Deaf and Dumb Institute, Lansing 

Michigan Horticultural Society, Lansing 

Miles, B. J., Eldora, la : 

Miller, E., Lawrence 

Miller, J. H., President, Holton 

Milliken, Robert, Emporia 

Mills, Charles F., Springfield, 111 

Mills, T. B., Las Vegas, N. M 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul 

Missouri Auditor of State, Jefferson City 

Missouri Pacific Railway, St. Louis 

Missouri, University of, Columbia .» 



26 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS— Continued. 



Domor$. 



Books. 



Pamp 



lIlMOori Uoirenitj. School of Mines, Holla. 

Mitchell. 1). A.,\VichlU 

Moore, R. R. Topeka « 

Mornui, E. G„ IJe« Moines, la 

MoTfan.Geo. II.,St. Ix>ul8, Mo 

Morgan, Rer. H., Clareoiont, Minn 

Morsan, T. J., Providence, R. I 

MoriartT, F. A., Council Grove ^. 

Morrill, Hon. E. N.. Hiawatha 

Morrill Normal School, Morrill 

Morris, Hon. R. B., Topeka 

Monie. Richard C, New York city 

Moeher, J. A., Scandla 

Molter, John L., St. Joseph, Mo 

Munk, Dr. J. A., Topeka 

Murdock. M. M., Wichita - ., 

Murray, David, .\lbany. N. Y 5 

National Hoard of Health. Washington, D. C 5 

Nebraska, Governor of, Lincoln I 4 

Neelander, Edwanl, Lind»borg 

New England Historical (Genealogical Socletv, Boston, Mass 

New England Hospital for Women and Children, Roxbury, Mass 

New England Industrial School, Ikverly, Mass 

New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord 

New Jersey Historical Society, Newark 

New Jersey .State Board of I^abor Statistics, Trenton 

New York State Itoard of Health, Albany 

New York I*. K. city .Mission, New York city 

Newcomb, Prof, .siiiion, Washington, D. C 

Niles, James It., Auditor General, Harrisburg, Pa 

Nortbfield Seminary, Northfield, Mass 

Norton, C. A., Belolt 

Oficer, Mrs. Susan, Topeka , 

CHara, 1* A., Reno Center 

Ohio.Sute Board of Agriculture, Columbus 

Oldham, J. T., Kl Dorado 

Oldroyd, O. H., Springfield, HI 

Osburn, W. H., Burrton 

Otgoodbr. W. W., Rochester, N. Y 

Otuwa University. Ottawa „ 

Owen, Col. Richard, New Harmony, Indiana .'.'..' 

Oyster, Dr. J. H., Paola, Kansas 

Paddock, Rt. Rev. Benjamin H., Boston, Mass 

Palmer. Sheffield. Mound City 

Parmelee, G. F., Topeka 

Parmelee, J. B., Lincoln, Neb ' 

Patrick, A. G., Valley Falls 

Pattee, F. J., Smith Center ^ 

Paxton, W. M., Platte City, Mo 

Peek, Charles F., Albany, N. Y ."!*.'.'.!!!!!!!". 

Pennsylrania Soldiers' (irphans' Home, Harrisburg....!..'.".* 

PeDnsylvanU, University of, Philadelphia 7. 

Perkins, Hon. B. W., Oswego 

Peters, s. R., Newton "!'.!"."".'." ""* 

Phjjadelphi. Academy of Natural ScienMs, PhiVadelpM^^^ 

b^ii J*" ''*''* '''^'■"'^y Company, Philadelphia, Pa . 

Phi ade phla Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, V 



Society, Philadelphia, Pa.. 



5«"«d^'phU Public Library CompaKyJ^hiladeiphla Pa. Z.^^^ " 

PIckard, J. I^ Iowa City, la 

P»f.e.tien. Albert. Washington, D. C 

Plllsburr, Parker, (Joncord. N. H 

Plumb, Hon. Preston B.. Emiwiria 



•reston B.. Emporia 
for 



Political Education. Society for, New York'city 

Pond. C. V R, Lansing, Mich 

Popenot • ■ Manhattan 'Z.'V.V.Vr/.ZZ 

Pomeros ngton, D. C 

Prouty. 

Publish. ^^'yoik^"Z'""z:":""": 

(juick, li ' 

Rash, 11 ...'."..'.'.v..'.'.*.!**. 

Rastall, M,^. , «„„n. ii'.', Buri'lngime' 



.^r". I iiniiH- II., Kuriingame 

an, R. A., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Dr. J. W., Topeka 

►r.J.T.,Appleton,Wls. .V.V.*.;; 



Beev«, i>r 

Register, lola... 

R«^ A. B.. Chicago. Ill :;:;;:::::;: 

.^ 2fei! f*i^ H»«ori<»l Society, ProTldonM .V.:: 

Richawia, Emiiy R., Bo^n/iiiii".;;:;;;;;:;:.;;;;;;;;;; 



106 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 



27 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS — Continued. 



Donors. 



Richmond, Rev. J. S. New York city 

Riddle, Gov. A. P., Minneapolis 

Robertson, Bishop C. F., St. Louis, Mo 

Robinson, H. E. Maryville, Mo 

Robinson, M. L., Winfield 

Roby, Dr. H. W., Topeka : 

Roe, Alfred S., Worcester, Mass 

Rogers, Horace, Hudson, 

Roop, C. Y., Holtou 

Root, Frank A., Gunnison, Col 

Ross, Dr. Alexander M., Montreal, Canada 

Ross, Gov. Edmund G., Santa Fe, N. M 

Roudebush, J. W. & E. E., Topeka 

Rounds, S. P., Washington, D. C 

Rovrell, Geo. P.&Co., New York city 

Rowen, Stephen C, Washington, D. C 

Ruggles, Wm. B., Albany, N. Y 

Ryan, Hon. Thomas, Topeka 

St. John, E., Chicago, HI 

St. John, Gov. John P., Olathe 

Salomon, Dr. Lucian, New Orleans, La 

Sanborn, F. B., Concord, Mass 

Sanborn, J. W., Kansas City, Mo 

Sandefur, Rev. W. J., Sunnydale 

San Diego, Cal., Immigration Association, San Diego 

Schliemann, W. E., Manhattan 

Scientific American, New York city 

Scott, Lewis, Marysville , 

Scott-Browne, D. L., New York city 

Seaver, Edwin, P., Boston, Mass 

Seymore, Norman, Sec, Mt. Morris, N. Y 

Shaffer, John R., Fairfield, Iowa 

Shaw, Arch., Olathe 

Sheffield, Rev. C. S., Topeka 

Shelden, Alvah, El Dorado 

Sheltering Arms Association, New York city 

Shelton, Prof. E. M., Manhattan 

Shepard, R. B., Anthony 

Sherman, Porter, Wyandotte 

Sheward, L. A., Cherry vale 

Simmons, Dr. N., Lawrence 

Sims, Hon. Wm., Topeka 

Smith, Dr. Ashbury G., Boston, Mass 

Smith, B. F., Lawrence 

Smith, C. W., Lawrence 

Smith, Geo. W., Topeka 

Smith, John H., Lansing 

Smith, P. W., Sec, Hays City 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C 

Smyth, B.B., Topeka 

Snyder, Rev. J. H., Lecompton 

Societe des Sciences et de Geographic, Port-au-Prince, Hayti 

Soci6tedes Sciences, Lettres et Arts, de Pau, France 

Societe des Sciences Naturelles, LaRochelle, France 

Societe Havraise, d'Etudes Diverses, Havre, France 

Societe Historique, Literaire, Artistique et Scientifique, Du Cher, Paris, France. 

Society Nationale des Antiquaries de France, Paris 

South Carolina Deaf and Dumb Institute, Columbia, S. C 

South End Industrial School, Roxbury, Mass 

Speer, H. C, Topeka 

Spring, Prof. L. W., Lawrence 

Stanley, E., Lawrence 

Stevens, Thomas C, Hiawatha 

Stewart, A. P., Oxford 

Streit, Joseph, Hoyt 

Sturtevant, Dr. E. Lewis, Albany, N. Y 

Swarr, D. M., Lancaster, Pa 

Sweet, Rev. W. H., Baldwin 

Swiler, John W., Madison, Wis 

Taylor, Prest. A. R., Emporia 

Tennessee Deaf and Dumb Institute, Knoxville, Tenn 

Tennessee State Board of Health, Nashville, Tenn 

Tewkesbury, Geo. E., Topeka 

Thacher, T. D., Topeka 

Thayer, Rev. E. 0., Atlanta, Ga 

Thoman, G., New York city : 

Thomas, A., Topeka 

Thomas, Charles, Grand Center 

Thomas, Col. J. B., Dayton, 

Thomas, R. H., Mechanicsburg, Pa 



Books. 



251 



Pamp 



28 



STATE HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY. 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS— Continued. 



Donora. 



F. C, PUlDTlIle 

>o,(i«ort:« F.. MaiibatUn 

TbotnpsoD, Nathan, Ijiwrence ~ 

TboBipaon, Dr. Neclv, Topeka 

TbOBiwoD. W. E., Ultle Kock, Ark 

TIdrnuD, Dr.G. M.. Marion ^.'. 

Tllley, R. H., Newport, R. I 

TiUoCMO. D. C, Topeka. 

TonliBMD. Charles H., Topeka « ^^ 

TooUiaker, W. H.. Ce<lar Junction 

Train, M. J., Albany, t)regon 

Trimble, John, Secretary, Washington, D. C 

Troutiuan, Janics A.. Topeka. 

Tdrner, B. K., New York city 

Turner, L. L., Topeka. „ 

Turton. Profeswor U.S., Olathe 

Twe«ddale, William, Topeka. 

Udden, ProfesBor J. A 

Union Pacific Railwar, Denver, Col 

United .*«Utes Army, Chief of Enzineers, Washington, D. C. 
United State* Army, Chief of Ordnance, Washington, D. C 

United SUtes Bureau of Ethnology. Washington, D. 

United Sutea Bureau of Statistics, Washington, D. C 

United States Catholic Historical Society. New York citv.... 

Uniteti State* Civil Service Commission, Washington, D! C, 

United States Commissioner of .\griculturc, Washington, D. C 

United Slates Commissioner of Ethication, Washington, D. C 

United States Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Washington, D. C, 

United Stales Commissioner of I'atents, Washington, D. C 

United States Fish Commis-Hioner, Wa.<hington, D. C 

United States Ge«ilogical Survey, Dirt-ctor of, Washington, D. C... 

United SUtes Light House Board, Wa.shington, D. C 

United SUtes .Mint, Director of, Washington, D. C 

United SUtes Naval Observatory, Washington, D. C 

United SUtes Navy, Chief of Ordnance, Washington, D. C 

United Slates Navy, Secretary of, Washington, D. C 

United States Se<retary of the Interior, Washington, D.C 

United Sutes Secretary of State, Washington, D.C 

United .States Signal Service. Chief of, Washington, D. C '. 

United States Secntary of the Treasury, Washington: D. C 

United States .Secretary of War, Washfngton, D. C 

University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn 

Unknown 

Uuh Territory, (iovernor of. Salt I^ke City...!!!.*"*.!.'.*. 

Vail, BUhop Thomas H., Topeka 

yirginia Ixjpartment of Agriculture, Kichmond!*.*.*..'.."',.".!'.". 

Vltton, Charles W.. .MePherson 

VoUw. I>aniel. Independence !. 

Wade, F. J.,.st. lAoxir,, Mo !"! 

Walte, .Mrs. Anna C, Lincoln 



Books. Pamp 



Ind... 



Walker, John, Jefferson City, Mo 
Walker, J. II., Secretary, Adams 

Walt -n. Wirt W., (lay Center 

Want, Henry A., Rochester, N. Y 

Ward, I'resldent L. M.. Ottawa 

WanI, Mi^or U. (J.,. Sedan 

JXVl"' ^'^O'KC W.. Kansas City,*Mo..!!!.'.'."!!'.*.'.*.*.!!!!!! 

Warder, Professor H. B., Ijifayette, Ind 

Waters, A. C, Chanlon, Ohio 

w*I'f ^ ?**''• »^reozo, Potaluma, Cal '.*.*..!!!!!!"!!!! 

Webb, Linus s.. Topeka. 

Webb, Rev. W. S.. lola. 

Weighi^man, Matthew. TopekiC*;!*.'™!!!!!!*;;;^^^^^^^^^^ 

Helchbans, Jacob, Topeka 

Welsh, u ^•.i>'»ven worth...!!!!!!".'!!!!!!""!* 

Wberrell, John, Par>la 

West, Marr A., (iaiesburg. III.!.'.*.*!!!!!!! 

w!!l.^T"'' "••'-Mute Institute, Romney.'.!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

Western ru*, rvr, an.l Northern Ohio Historical Society, CleveUnd! 

Wl. '•'"* 

Wl,. 
While, w 

Whitehe:. V,r^ 

Whitney. , ,,"" 

Wileox, I'. I-., I), nver ( ol 



Science, Philadelphia, Pa,. 
icit 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 



29 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS — Concluded. 



Donors, 



Books. 



Pamp 



Williams, F. M., Verden, Neb 

Williams, Job, Hartford, Conn 

Williams, Col. J. F., St. Paul, Minn 

Wilson, Mrs. Augustus, Parsons 

Wilson, C. B., Secretary, Marysville 

Wilson, S. M., Secretary, Tennessee Ridge, Tenn 

Wilson, W. J., Winfield 

Winchell, Mrs. E. E., Madison, Conn 

Wintbrop, Robert C, Boston, Mass 

Winconsin Agricultural Experiment Station, Madison. 

Wisconsin Dairymen's Association, Fort Atkinson 

Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison 

Wisconsin, University of, Madison 

Wiseman, Theodore, Lawrence 



Wolf, Rev. Innocent, Atchison 

Wood, Samuel N., Woodsdale 

Woodford, J. E., Secretary, Burlington. 

Working, D. W., jr., Manhattan 

Wright, Carroll D., Boston, Mass 



Wright, Rev. S. C, McPherson 

Yale, Caroline A., Northampton, Mass 

Yale College, New Haven, Conn 

Young Woman's Christian Association, San Francisco, Cal. 
Zebrung, J. H., Cuba 



Total. 



2,309 9,710 



DONOKS OF MANUSCRIPTS. 

Abbott, James B., De Soto, Kansas: Original roll of officers and members 
of the company called the "Capital Guards," Topeka, 1861, composed of 
members and officers of the first State Legislature, then in session. 

Adams, Mrs. Harriet E., Topeka : Twenty-seven letters of Kansas women, 
written in relation to the procuring of portrait of Mrs. C. I. H. Nichols, 
to be placed in vol. 1 of the History of AVoraan Suffrage. 

Anthony, Col. D. R., Leavenworth: Credentials of Leavenworth county 
delegates to the Kansas Republican State Convention of 1886. 

Baker, C. C, Topeka: Autograph of Jefferson Davis on registry return 
receipt, acknowledging receipt by him of resolution passed by the Kansas 
Legislature, February 9, 1885, condemning Col. Frank Bacon for the part 
taken by him in ceremonies of respect to the ex-President of the Con- 
federacy, in connection with the "Liberty bell" and the Cotton Centennial 
Celebration at New Orleans, 1885-1886. 

Barnd, J. K., Ness City: Furlough granted Henry F. Thomas, private of 
Company C, first Confederate Regiment, Georgia volunteers, signed by 
Col. J. C. Gordon and Brig. Gen. John H. Jackson, dated Dalton, Georgia, 
January 25, 1864. 

Betton, Hon. Frank H., Topeka: Original manuscript of a discourse on the 
subject of Foreordination, by Matthew Thornton, a signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. 

Bradlee, Rev. C. D., Boston, Mass. : Autographs of John Quincy Adams, 
Thomas C. Amory, Nathaniel P. Banks, Geo. S. Boutwell, James Bowdoin, 
Josiah Bradlee, Samuel Bradlee, Edward Everett, Rufus Choate, Schuyler 
Colfax, Dorothea L. Dix, Joseph Henry, Geo. F. Hoar, Geo. S. Hillard, 



30 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



S. K. Lothrop, Charles Lowell, Geo. R. Minot, Edwin P. Whipple, and 
forty-five other distinguished persons. 

Brown, Geo. W., Rockford, 111. : Letter to the State Historical Society, dated 
June 9, 1886, relating to early Kansas newspaper history. 

Byram, Edward, Shannon: Manuscript papers of his grandfather, Rev. 
Jotham Meeker, missionary to the Ottawa 'and other Indian tribes in 
Michigan and Kansas, embracing letters and other papers written by him 
and others in the years 1820 to 1854, inclusive — 711 papers. 

Case, Theo. S., Kansas City, Mo. : Autograph letters, in morocco binding, 
written to donor in 1859 by Horace Greeley, relating to political and other 
affairs pertaining to Kansas and Kansas City, together with letter of donor 
giving a history of the correspondence. 

Cone, William W., Topeka : Letter of Gen. Henry I. Hunt, addressed to 
donor, dated Governor's office. Soldiers' Home, near Washington, D. C, 
June 7, 1885, relative to early days at Fort Leavenworth. 

Dieffenbach, O., Sunbury, Pa. : Reminiscences of John Hamilton, relating 
to his services in the United States Dragoons in aiding in the selection of 
the site of Fort Scott, Kansas, in April, 1842. 

Dill, Charles, Leavenworth : Monthly meteorological reports of Leaven- 
worth Signal station, January and February, 1885. 

Elliott, L. R., Manhattan : Seven papers relating to the National Anti- 
Saloon Conference, held at Chicago, September 16, 1886. 

Fields, Henry C, Leavenworth : Recollections of the history of the Kick- 
apoo cannon, and of its capture by citizens of Leavenworth, in January, 
1858. 

Finch, C. S., Harper : Postal card containing 3,307 words written with pen 
by W. F. Hunter, of Harper, dated January 25, 1886, descriptive of 
Harper county, Kansas. 

Graham, W. O., Harper : History of the founding and growth of the Harper 
City Free Library. 

Hale, Geo. D., Topeka : Manuscript books and papers relating to the busi- 
ness of the Tecumseh, Kansas, Town Company during the years 1855 and 
1856; given by Mrs. Hiram J. Strickler to donor; 46 manuscripts and 
28 blanks. 

Hebbard, J. C, Topeka: Sketch by donor of Prudence Crandall, entitled 
"Connecticut Canterbury Tales from Real Life." 

Holman, Rev. C, North Topeka : Manuscript Records of the Kansas Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church Conference, for the period from October 23, 1856, 
to the year 1874; three record books, and 719 manuscript papers. 

Inman, Henry, Ellsworth: Letter of R. E. Edwards giving an account of 
the naming of Edwards county, dated Kinsley, Kansas, January 27, 1886. 

Inman, Joseph Henry, Ellsworth: Parchment land patent issued by Fred- 
erick Calvert, 6th Lord Baron of Baltimore, Maryland, to Jacob French, 
of Frederick, Md., dated September 29, 1759. 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 31 

Jerome, Frank E., Russell : Letter of donor to the Kansas Historical Society 
relative to the authorship of the John Brown song, dated May 14, 1885; 
manuscript copy of donor's poem entitled, "American Flag with its Thirty- 
four Stars ; " letter of donor's mother relative to a gold medal given by the 
British Government to his father for services relating to the selection of 
the colors of British postage stamps; letter of donor explanatory of 
Indian hieroglyphics copied by him from rocks on the banks of the Saline 
river, four miles north of Russell, Kansas; three manuscript papers, of 
which the donor is author, entitled "Boys and Girls of China;" "Torna- 
does of Electric Origin ; " and Recollections of J. Wilkes Booth, in Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, in December, 1863." 

Johnson, Geo. Y., Lawrence: The book containing the registry of citizens 
of Kansas who attended the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial 
Exposition at New Orleans, 1884-1885, a large manuscript-bound volume. 

Johnson, Mrs. Libbie P., Willis : Letter of Hiram Powers to Miss Abby 
Gibson, of Cincinnati, Ohio, dated Florence, Italy, May 10, 1841 ; also 
autograph poem of Mrs. L. H. Sigourney, entitled " Powers's Statue of 
the Greek Slave," dated August 5, 1851. 

Kansas House of Representatives, Topeka: Address of General Francisco 
O. Arce, Governor of the State of Guerrero, Mexico, to the Kansas House 
of Representatives, January 15, 1885, and translation of the same. 
Ordered by the House to be deposited in the library of the State His- 
torical Society. 

Kennedy, Maj. W. B., Lawrence: Manuscript account of the murder of 
John Jones, at Blanton's Bridge, May, 1856. 

Marshall, Gen. Frank J., Longmont, Col. : Biographical sketch of donor. 

Martin, Gov. John A., Topeka: Governor's proclamation relative to the 
death of Gen. U. S. Grant, dated July 23, 1885, autograph copy. 

Osburn, W. H., Burrton: Certificate of membership in Osburn's Oklahoma 
colony. 

Owen, Richard, New Harmony, Ind. : Autographs of Robert Dale Owen and 
David Dale Owen; also of Robert Owen sr., written about the year 1854, 
at the age of 85, and 2 letter envelopes addressed by the latter to donor. 

Pierce, Hon. Edward L., Milton, Mass. : Thirteen manuscript letters written 
from Kansas in 1855 and 1856 to Hon. Charles Sumner, by the following 
persons: John Hutchinson, Charles Stearns, S. C. Harrington, Thomas 
Shankland, Henry P. Waters, J. B. McAfee, Samuel F. Tappan, Mrs. 
H. A. Ropes, Lydia P. Hall, and James F. Legate. 

Sherman, Hon. John, Mansfield, O. : Original manuscript of the report of 
the Kansas Congressional Committee of 1856, given the State Historical 
Society through Hon. H. J. Dennis, State Librarian. 

Smith, Geo. W., Topeka : Receipt book of Docket Clerk, Kansas House of 
Representatives, 1885, containing autographs of chairmen of committees. 

Snyder, J. H., San Diego, Cal. : Copy of notice of Atchison Rangers, a 



32 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



Pro-Slavery company, warning John Henry and George Heron, Free-State 
men, to leave the Territory of Kansas, dated August 23, 1856; also, 
biographical sketch of donor. 

Stubbs, Mahlon, Emporia: Original tribal copy of treaty with the Kansas 
tribe of Indians, by which the right-of-way through their lands was con- 
ceded for the use of the wagon-road from the Missouri river to New Mex- 
ico, dated August 16, 1825. 

Tilloteon, D. C, Topeka: Manuscript book containing a roster of attend- 
ants at the National Educational Convention at Topeka, in July, 1886; 
also, index to the same ; also, register of Kansas teachers attending the 
convention. 

Waller, G. M., Atchison : Land patent issued by President Andrew Jackson 
to Richard Doulware, dated October 13, 1835. 

Waugh, Rev. Lorenzo, Petaluma, Cal. : Reminiscences relating to persons 
and incidents mentioned in his book, entitled "Autobiography of Lorenzo 
Waugh." 

Welsh, L. A., Leavenworth : Monthly meteorological summary at Leaven- 
worth Signal Station, for May, August, September and December, 1886. 

Wilcox, Hon. Philip P., Denver, Col. : Biographical sketch of donor. 

Wilder, Daniel W., Topeka: Paper written by Prof John B. Dunbar, con- 
taining a bibliography of French authorities on the Kansas region. 

Winchell, Mrs. E. E., Madison, Conn.: Sketch written by donor relating to 
early times in Kansas. 

Wood, Samuel N., Topeka : The original order of Gen. Edward Hatch, which 
was served on Oklahoma colonists, dated headquarters, troops in the field, 
Oklahoma, on the Cimarron river, January 19, 1885. 

DONORS OF MAPS, ATLASES, &C. 

Bartlett, J. R., Washington, D. C. : Eight pilot charts of the North Atlantic 
ocean, months of January to December, 1886; map of Baffin's bay to 
Lincoln sea, polar regions. 

Barton, Edmond M., Worcester, Mass.: One map of the Mississippi river; 
seventeen Frank Leslie's war maps ; one new military map of the Southern 
and border States ; six other war maps of the Rebellion. 

Bennett & Smith, Garden City : Maps of the Garden City U. S. Land District. 

Edwards, John P., Quincy, 111.: Atlas of Cloud county, Kansas, 1885. 

Goodnow, Prof I. T., Manhattan: Folding map of Kansas, showing Agri- 
cultural College lands, 1870; seventeen maps relating to the sale of rail- 
road lands in Davis, Wabaunsee, Riley and Neosho counties, Kansas; 
map of Indianapolis, Indiana, 1864; map of the State of Missouri, St. 
Louis, 1871. 

Mulhollen, Isaac, Kenneth: Map of Sheridan county. 

Rand, McNally & Co., Chicago, III. : New Handy Atlas of the Northwest ; 
mounted map of Kansas, 1886. 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 33 

Scott, Orr & Co., Kansas City, Mo. : Map of Kansas City, Wyandotte, and 

Armourdale. 
Shelden, Alvah, El Dorado: Map of Butler county. 
Sims, Wm., Topeka: Fifteen maps of Kansas. 
Taylor, Prest. A. K. Emporia: Maps of Kansas showing Kansas State 

Normal School lands. 
Triplet, C. S., Leoti City: Map of Southwestern Kansas counties, showing 

situation of Leoti City, Wichita county. 
Union Pacific Railway Co., Kansas City, Mo. : Map of the Union Pacific 

Railway and connecting railroads. 
White, Thomas J., Atchison : Hayden's Atlas of Colorado and portions of 

adjacent territory. 
Wood, S. N., Topeka : Map of Oklahoma. 
WoodruflT, Frank M., Topeka : Five war maps of portions of Tennessee and 

Georgia, 1863. 

DONORS OF SINGLE NEWSPAPERS AND NEWSPAPER CUTTINGS. 

Alrich, L. L., Beloit : Copy of Beloit Record, spring supplement, illustrated, 
April 16, 1885; clipping from Cawker City Record of April 30, 1885, con- 
taining an account of the settlement of Hascall Skinner at Waconda, 
Mitchell county, October 1, 1869. 

Ashbaugh, Miss Anna, Topeka : New York Morning Herald, Vol. 1, No. 1, 
May 6, 1835; Buck and Ball, Vol. 1, No. 1, Cane Hill, Arkansas, Decem- 
ber 6, 1862, published by Union troops; Topeka Tribune extra, October 
27, 1864, containing an account of the battle of the Big Blue, Missouri, 
October 23, 1864. 

Ball, Mrs. Bell, Topeka : Eighty-one historical newspaper clippings ; copy of 
Our Dumb Animals (periodical), Boston, September, 1886 ; The Weekly 
Occidental, a Chinese newspaper, San Francisco, August 7, 1885 ; San 
Francisco Chronicle, August 2-9, 1886, seven newspapers, containing re- 
port of G. A. R. and W. R. C. encampment in San Francisco ; San Fran- 
cisco Call, August 3, 1886, 28 pages, containing proceedings of National 
encampment, August, 1886. 

Barton, Edmond M., Worcester, Mass. : 82 copies miscellaneous magazines ; 
20 copies of the New England Farmer, scattering numbers, December 9, 
1848 to March, 1867. 

Betton, Hon. Frank H., Topeka: Harper's Magazine, August, 1873, coiv 
taining sketch of Matthew Thornton and other signers of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. 

Bosbyshell, Maj. O. C, Philadelphia, Pa.: Clipping from the Grand Army 
Scout and Soldier's Mail, Philadelphia, November 3, 1883, containing an 
account of the origin of the John Brown song. 

Bradlee, Rev. C. D., Boston, Mass : Boston Watchman of December 24, 
1885; Boston Beacon, May 29, 1886 — article entitled, "On the Lookout; 
What is a Free Church"; Fair Haven (Mass.) Star, September 5, 1885, 



34 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



proceedings and addresses at dedication of Rogers's School ; clipping from 
the Portland (Me.) Press, of February 28, 1885, containing account of 
the celebration of Longfellow's birthday, by the Maine Historical Society; 
Dedham (Mass.) Transcript, September 21, 1886, containing account of 
the celebration of the 250th anniversary of the incorporation of the town ; 
clipping from the Morning Star, Boston, September 23, 1886, containing 
Charles William Butler's poem, entitled " Lines on Seeing Longfellow's 
House Again;" clippings from the Chelsea (Mass.) Record and Boston 
Globe, containing observances on the 50th anniversary of the marriage 
of the Rev. Elias Mason and wife, November, 1886 ; Holiday Transcript, 
Boston, December 24, 1886. 

Burnett, J. C, Topeka: The "B — B — Blizzard," January 23, 1886. 

Bushell, Wm., Camden, N. J.: Philadelphia Daily News of April 29, 1885, 
containing an account of Ben. Franklin's heirs; eight newspaper cuttings 
relating to the last illness, death and burial of Horace Greeley ; five Phila- 
delphia newspapers containing account of the proceedings of the funeral 
of Greneral Grant; Philadelphia Press of April 9, 1885, containing an 
account of " What General Mahone saw of the surrender of Lee to Grant" ; 
newspaper clippings relating to " John Brown prisoners while awaiting 
death," and to an incident relating to John Brown's sons and the G. A. R. 
at Pasadena, Cal., August, 1886; miniature copy of the Philadelphia 
Weekly Press of September 29, 1881, containing an account of the funeral 
obsequies of President Garfield ; Philadelphia Daily Press of August 4, 
1885, account of the Philadelphia and Camden cyclone of August 3, 1885; 
Philadelphia Daily News, October 3, 1885; the "Log Cabin," Horace 
Greeley's paper. New York and Albany, August 22, 1840; miniature copy 
of the Philadelphia Daily News of October 3, 1885; copy of the New 
York Sun of September 3, 1833, first issue of the paper, reprint ; Philadel- 
phia Press of June 3, 1886, containing an account of President Cleveland's 
marriage; also, clippings relating to decorating Confederate graves, and 
to "The Indian Problem." 

Canfield, Prof. J. H., Lawrence: Copy of Shasta (Cal.) Republican of 
February 6, 1858. 

Carr, S. C, Milton Junction, Wis.: Western Farmer and Wisconsin Grange 
Bulletin, January 2, and February 6, 1886. 

Caae, Nelson, Oswego: Kansas State Sunday School Journal, January, 1882, 
January, 1883, October, 1884, October, 1885, and July, 1886. 

Clarke, Robert, Cincinnati, O.: Cincinnati Commercial Gazette, December 
26, 1885, containing an article on the John Brown song. 

Clarke, Sylvester H., Clyde, N. Y.: Ten clippings from newspapers chiefly 
of the years 1856 and 1857, containing historical matter relating to Kan- 
Ms; New York Independent of January 12, 1871, containing article by 
a C. Pomeroy on Robert E.Lee; Washington National Republican of 
November 29, 1862, containing speech of S. C. Pomeroy at contraband 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 35 

dinner; Washington New Era, April 12, 1864, containing speech of S. 
C. Pomeroy in the United States Senate; "The Barnburner" — news- 
paper, August 5, 1848, containing speech of Thomas Corwin on the Com- 
promise Bill in the United States Senate, July 24, 1848. 

Coleman, D., and wife, Topeka : Copy of Ulster County Gazette of January 
4, 1800, containing account of the death of President Washington. 

Cook, Hon. B. C, Harper: Copies of Richmond (Va.) Daily Dispatch of 
February 22, 1861, December 2, 1862, April 1 and June 10, 1863, and 
August 31 and September 9, 1864 — six newspapers. 

Darling, Gen, Charles W., Utica, N. Y. : Clipping from New York Daily 
Press, comment on article of Gov. John A. Martin, in North American 
Review. 

Drowne, Henry T., New York City: New York Times of August 9, 1885— 
account of proceedings of the funeral of General Grant. 

Easley, Ralph M., Hutchinson: Hutchinson Daily News, October 13, 1886 
— illustrated sketch of the 'town of St. John, Kansas; Hutchinson Daily 
News, November 12, 1886, containing illustrated historical material re- 
lating to the city of Hutchinson. 

Elliott, L. R., Manhattan: Five Chicago newspapers containing proceed- 
ings of the National Anti-Saloon Conference, Chicago, September, 1886 ; 
eleven copies of the Evening Courier, Independence, Kansas, March 7 to 
November 17, 1879. 

Frost, H. W., Topeka: Memphis (Tenn.) Sunday Times , of August 9, 1885, 
containing an account of the negro man said to be the person who, while 
an infant, was kissed by Capt. John Brown when on the way to his exe- 
cution at Charlestown, Va. 

Fuller Mrs. Mary, Washington, D. C. : Copies of the Washington Post and 
Star of November 21, 1885, containing obituary notices of Robert L. 
Ream. 

Gill, Geo. B., Afton, Iowa: Two clippings relative to the connection of 
donor with the provisional government formed by John Brown prepara- 
tory to the Harper's Ferry invasion. 

Goodnow, Rev. Isaac T., Manhattan : Three copies of the New Century, 
Fort Scott, March 21, 1875, and August 12 and 29, 1877. 

Grant, Geo. K., Ottawa: The Alpha Media, Kansas, vol. 1, Nos. 4, 7, 12, 
1884 (amateur newspaper.) 

Green, Dr. Samuel A., Boston, Mass. : Copies of the Bay State Monthly, 
Boston, January, May, June, and October, 1884; The Excelsior, Boston, 
June and July, 1858; eighteen copies of "Our Dumb Animals," news- 
paper, April 1874, to June 1875. 

Halderman, Gen. John A., Bangkok, Siam : The Siam Weekly Advertiser, 
Bangkok, January 27, and February 3 and 10, 1883. 

Hick, R. S., Louisville : Cherokee Advocate, Tahlequah, September 11, 1845 ; 
Arkansas Traveler, Cane Hill, January 1, 1863. 



36 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



Honey, J. W. & Co., Clyde: Four copies of the Clyde Star, vol. 1, Nos. 

1 and 4, March 14 and 25, 1884. 
Hopkins, A. C, Salina: The Normal Register, Salina, for April, 1885. 
Hunter, Mrs. M. J., Concordia: Clippings from the Kansas Farmer, her 

poems, " Vae Victis," and "Three Walks." 
Jerome, Frank E., Russell : 27 clippings from Russell Record of dates from 

1884 to 1886, containing 8 prose articles and 19 poems written by donor; 

biographical sketch of Hon. Asa Kinney, clipped from Russell Record 

ofOctober?. 1886. 
Judd, Orange, Chicago, 111.: Circular from Prairie Farmer entitled, " Who 

Shall Go West." 
Kenea & Lane, La Cygne: La Cygne Daily Journal, September 30 to 

October 3, 1885 — Fair paper. 
Kennedy, Maj. W. B., Lawrence: Supplement to Lawrence Republican, 

containing list of voters of Lawrence township, Douglas county, for the 

year 1859. 
Knox, Rev. M. V. B., Littleton, N. H.: The Methodist Pulpit and Pew for 

January, 1886. 
Leake, Paul, Lawrence : Hudson (N. Y.) Weekly Gazette of April 9, 1885, 

containing fac-simile of volume I, No. 1 of the Hudson Weekly Gazette 

of April?, 1785. 
Latour, Maj. L. A. H., Montreal, Canada : Copy of Canadian Antiquarian 

and Numismatic Journal ofOctober, 1881. 
Leahy, D. D., Caldwell: New York Morning Post, November 7, 1783; two 

copies, repjint. 
Lester, Champ, Russell: Clipping from National Tribune, Washington, 

D. C, containing account of the spiking of a rebel battery on Island No. 

10, March 31, 1862, of which affair donor was a participant. 
Lilley, George, Brookings, D. T.: The Dakota Collegian, Brookings, May 

27, 1885. 
Maloy, John, Council Grove : Council Grove Cosmos, September 23, 1886, 

containing a chapter of donor's history of Morris county. 
Manchester, Rev. Alfred, Providence, R. I. : Two Providence newspapers 

of June 24 and 25, 1886, containing account of the celebration of the 

founding of Providence, 1663-1886. 
Maxwell, M. M., Valley Falls: Valley Falls Daily Register, September 1, 

1885 — Fair paper. 
Miller, J. H., President, Holton : Ten numbers of the Normal Advocate, 

Holton, 1883-1886. 
Miller, Hon. Sol., Troy: Seven numbers of the Eaton (Ohio) Register, of 

dates from October 22, 1885, to April 22, 1886; and nineteen copies of 

the Twin Valley Times, West Alexandria, O., of dates from June 3, 1886, 

to January 6, 1887, containing articles written by the donor relating to 

the early history of West Alexandria and Preble county, Ohio, chiefly 

written under the head, " Reminiscences of Twin." Copies of the Sever- 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 37 

ance Advertiser of April 5 and 19, and May 2, 1884, and of the Alumni 
Annual, Highland University for 1884. 

Mills, T. B., Las Vegas, N. M. : San Miguel County Republican, October, 
1886, seven numbers. 

Moore, Robert R., Topeka: Dye's Counterfeit Detector for October, Novem- 
ber, December, 1885, and January, 1886. 

Moriarty, F. A., and Waller, W. F., Council Grove: Copies of the Council 
Grove Cosmos containing John Maloy's History of Morris county. 

Neelander, Edward, Lindsborg : Copies of the " Pedagogen," Lindsborg, 
vol. 1, Nos. 1 to 9, excepting No. 6, 1885, and vol. 2, No. 3, 1886. 

Nichols, Miss Nellie C, Pomo, Cal. : Clipping from Ukiah City, Cal., Press 
of January 16, 1885, containing obituary of Mrs. C. I. H. Nichols. 

Olney, Mrs. Eugenie Wilde, Lake City, Col. : Mount Vernon, Iowa, Hawk- 
eye of June 25, 1886, containing Commencement Exercises of Cornell 
College, 1886. 

Olney, Henry C, Lake City, Col. : Biographical sketch of Gov. E. G. Ross, 
with a statement of how he received his appointment as Governor of 
New Mexico. 

Owen, Col. Richard, New Harmony, Ind. : Evansville, Indiana, Journal of 
September 8, 1886, containing an article written by donor on the Origin 
of Earthquakes; biography of donor in "Indiana Student," April, 1886. 

Payne, Abraham, Providence, R. I.: Four copies of the Windham County, 
Connecticut, Standard of May 12, 1886, containing article by donor, enti- 
tled " Prudence Crandall." 

Prentis, Noble L., Atchison : Clipping from Atchison Champion, Novem- 
ber 17, 1886, containing article entitled " Kansas Naturalists, Ancient 
and Modern." 

Root, Frank A., Gunnison, Col.: Clipping from Denver Tribune Republi- 
can, July 3, 1886, containing article entitled " Gunnison County's Jubi- 
lee ;" clipping from the Denver Tribune Republican — article entitled 
" The Great Gunnison Region;" Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Octo- 
ber 8, 1886 — opening of the Second Annual Manufacturers' Exposition 
at Denver; Five Salt Lake City newspapers and sixteen Colorado news- 
papers of March, 1885 ; three Colorado newspapers of March and 
November, 1884, one of May 1, 1881, and one Salt Lake City paper of 
November, 1884; Denver Opinion of August 15 and 22, 1885, and Den- 
ver Daily News of August 16, 1885. 

Root, Frank A. & Sons, North Topeka : Copies of the North Topeka Mail, 
containing article on the Kansas State Historical Society. 

Ross, Dr. Alexander M., Montreal, Canada: Pictorial History of the 
Harper's^ Ferry Insurrection, a supplement to Frank Leslie's Illustrated 
Newspaper, November 19, 1859 ; clipping from the Montreal Herald 
and Commercial Gazette of November 23, 1885, containing an account 
of the sanitary condition of Montreal. 
3 



:]S STATS HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



Sage, Frank I., Alma: Council Grove Press of November 10, 1860; Feb- 
ruary 16 and 23, March 16, 23, 30, April 13, 20 and 27, May 4, 11, 18 
and 25, June 1 and 22 and July 6, 1861 ; Emporia News, September 29, 
1860, and The Crisis, (^olumbus, Ohio, June 20, 1861— eighteen news- 
papers. 

Shiner & Audei-son, Westmoreland: Copy of the Westmoreland Recorder 
of January 10, 1887, containing Kansas Reminiscences, by Sylvester 
Fowler. 

Snyder, J. H., San Diego, Cal.: Kansas Daily Tribune, Topeka, March 11, 
1856, vol. 1, No. 6; Sumner Daily Gazette, Sumner, Atchison county, 
October 1, 1857, vol. 1, No. 8; proceedings of Free-State Territorial 
Convention at Lawrence, December 2, 1857, Lawrence Republican extra; 
proceedings of Free-State mass-meeting at Lawrence, February 13, 1856; 
speech of General Lane on President Buchanan's message transmitting 
to the Senate the Lecompton Constitution, Lawrence Republican extra ; 
San Diego Weekly Sun, December 19, 1885. 

Turrell, Nyraphas S., Topeka: Political Barometer, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 
May 10, 1803. 

Unknown : The Missionary Visitor, Dayton, Ohio, May 8, 1886, containing 
Eugene F. Ware's poem entitled "The Washerwoman." 

Wait, Charles E.,.Rolla, Mo.: RoUa Weekly Herald of April 15, 1886— 
description and illustrations of the Missouri School of Mines. 

Walton, W. W., Clay Center: Clay Center Dispatch of November 26, 1885, 
containing " Exhibit of Progress of Clay County and Clay Center." 

Walton, Tell W., Clay Center : Three copies Emigration edition Caldwell 
Journal, March 25, 1886. 

Waters, A. C, Chardon, Ohio: 108 copies of "The Home Missionary Mag- 
azine," 1873-1883; 42 copies of miscellaneous magazines and pamphlets ; 
57 copies of miscellaneous newspapers. 

Waters, Mrs. E. A., Chardon, Ohio: 38 numbers of "Life and Light," 
monthly missionary magazine, Boston, 1871-1884; 74 copies miscellane- 
ous Sunday school papers, 1858-1876. 

Waugh, Rev. L., Petaluma, Cal.: Copy of California Voice, September 30, 
1886, containing article written by donor, entitled " Wine is a Mocker." 

Whitcomb, A., Lawrence : Copy of the " Second Interregnum," Honolulu^ 
Sandwich Islands, March 3, 1874, containing an account of events relat- 
ing to the death and burial of King Lunalilo; The Kansas Crusader of 
Freedom, Doniphan, Kansas, of January 30 and March 6, 1858 ; The 
Herald of Freedom, Lawrence, May 17, 1856. 

Wilcox, P. P., Denver, Col.: Rocky Mountain News, containing list of 
Colorado pioneers; Rocky Mountain Herald, Denver, August 8, 1885; 
two copies of the " Rocky Mountain Herald," Denver, October 21 and 23, 
1886, containing biographical notes of Colorado men and women ; Den- 
ver Tribune, September 12, 1886— article written by donor on the poli- 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 39 

tics of Denver and Arapahoe county; clipping from the Denver Tribune- 
Kepublican, August 27, 1885, relating to the Apache Indian trouble, 
also of July 3, 1886, containing article entitled " His Accounts Settled;" 
Denver Tribune-Republican, August 28, 1886, containing letter of Gov. 
C. Meyer Zulick, of Arizona; "The Rocky Mountain Call," Denver, 
August 21, 1886, and "The Salt Lake Tribune," August 8, 1886; clip- 
pings from Denver News, September 19, 1886, and Denver Graphic, 
September 18, 1886, containing biography and portrait of Hon. Perry L. 
Hubbard; copy of the Denver Republican of January 1, 1887, contain- 
ing biographies of members of the Colorado Legislature; copy of the 
Rocky Mountain News, Denver, January 16, 1887 ; Rocky Mountain 
Herald, Denver, October 3, 1886, containing proceedings of the Sixth 
Annual meeting of Colorado Pioneers. 

Wilder, Mrs. C. F., Manhattan: Three clippings from the Central Christian 
Advocate, St. Louis — articles written by donor ; 30 clippings from Wor- 
cester, Mass., Spy, and the Central Christian Advocate, St. Louis — arti- 
cles written by donor; Central Christian Advocate, St. Louis, Mo., April 
21 and May 12, 1886, containing articles written by donor. 

Wilder, D. W., Hiawatha : Clipping from the Topeka Commonwealth, con- 
taining a statement of Spanish authorities on the Kansas region. 

Williams, M. Parker, Hudson, N. Y.: Hudson Gazette of April 9, 1885, 
Centennial edition, 1785-1885, containing fac-simile of original number. 

Woodman, Seldon J., North Topeka : Clippings from the Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, Courier-Journal of July 23, 1883, containing notice of donor's 
portrait of John Brown ; clipping from Chicago Times of March 3, 1885, 
containing reminiscences of John Brown and John E. Cook; clipping 
containing account of the dedication of the Rhode Island State Normal 
School Building, January 3, 1879. 

Zebrung, J. H., Cuba: Six numbers of the Nebraska Congregational News, 
Lincoln, January to June, 1885; clipping from the "Lever," entitled 
" Prohibition or Death," by Charles H. Branscomb. 

DONORS OF PICTURES. 

Abbott, Maj. James B., DeSoto: Monogram of the Kansas House of Rep- 
resentatives, 1868. 

Adams, A. A., Garnett : Stereoscopic view of the Anderson county, Kan- 
sas, cyclone, of April 23, 1884. 

Baker, F. P., Topeka : Portraits of representative Parisian journalists, with 
fac-similes of journals, in miniature. 

Bartlett, T. H., Boston, Mass.: Photograph of plaster cast of statue of John 
Brown, executed by Paul W. Bartlett. 

Brown, Geo. W., Rockford, 111.: Ferreotype portrait of Prof. B. F. Mudge, 
taken about 1865. . * 

Byram, Ed., Shannon : Portrait of Rev. Jotham Meeker, with autograph. 



40 



STATE HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY. 



Capper, Arthur, Topeka: Monogram containing portraits of Richard J. 

Colver, L. A. Wright, C. K. Holliday, Arthur Capper, Geo. M. Clark, 

J. L. Thornton, G. M. Ewing, C. E. Mcintosh and A. J. McCabe, city 

editors of the Toj)eka daily newspapers, 1886. 
Case, Theo. S., Kansas City, Mo.: Steel portrait of Horace Greeley, bound 

in with manuscript letters of Mr. Greeley. 
Colt, Mrs. M. D., Albion, Mich.: Photo portrait of the donor, author of the 

book entitled "Went to Kansas." 
Cooke, Gen. Philip St. George, Detroit, Mich.: Cabinet photo portrait of 

donor. 
Crane, George W., Topeka: Photo portrait of Dr. F. L. Crane; also, large 

gilt-framed crayon portrait of Dr. F. L. Crane. 
Darling, C. W., Utica, N. Y.: Cabinet photo of donor. 
Drake, A. W., Century Company, New York City: Fifty-eight selected 

proofs of engravings, from Century and St. Nicholas Magazines. 
Edwards, Hon. W. C, Larned: Cabinet photo portrait of donor. 
Garrison, Francis J., Roxbury, Mass.: Life-size photo portrait of William 

Lloyd Grarrison. 
Gilmore, John S., Fredonia: Wood-cut of Wilson county court house. 
Gillett, Almerin, Emporia ; James Smith, D. W. Wilder, William Sims, 

T. D. Thacher, J. W. Hamilton, T. McCarthy, S. B. Bradford, L. L. Turner, 

and F.G.Adams: Oil portrait of Gov. John A. Martin, painted by 

Seldon J. Woodman. 
Goodnow, Prof L T.. Manhattan : Birds-eye view of Philadelphia, Pa., in 

Harper's Weekly of May 27, 1876. 
Gray, Lewis L., Lawrence: 23 cabinet photos of prominent citizens of 

Kansas. 
Holman, Mrs. Jennie Rawlins, New York City: Cabinet portrait of Gen. 

John A. Rawlins. 
Home, Col. D. H., Oceanside, Cal.: Life-size crayon portrait of donor, done 

by J. Lee Knight. 
Howard, Win. S., Grand Rapids, Mich.: Engraved portraits of his father, 

the late Gen. Wm. A. Howard. 
Jerome, F. E., Russell : Card photo of his son and daughter, Walter and 

Mattie Jerome ; drawings representing Indian hieroglyphics on rocks on 

the banks of Saline river, near Russell ; pencil sketch made by donor, 

of Beloit, as in 1871 ; photo view at Leavenworth, 1885, and of Leaven- 
worth court house and Leavenworth bridge. 
Johnson, Geo. Y., Lawrence: Four large photographs representing the 

Kansas display at the New Orleans Cotton Centennial Exposition, of 1885. 
Johnson, Mrs. Libbie P., Willis: Daguerreotype portrait of Jennie Lind. 
Jones. C. J., Garden City: Photographs of entrances to U. S. Land Office 

at Garden City. 
Kelly, F. J., Cawker City: Cabinet photo portrait of donor. 
liconard <fe Martin, Topeka : Cabinet photo portraits of State employes. 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 41 

and members and officers of the Senate and House of Representatives, 

1885-6—276 in all. 
Leonhardt, Mrs. C. F. W., Manhattan: Photo portrait of General Leon- 

hardt. 
Marlatt, Washington, Manhattan : Two large photos representing donor as 

in 1856 and as in 1886. 
Marshall, Gen. Frank J., Longmont, Col.: Engraved portrait of donor. 
Martin, Geo. AY., Junction City : Cabinet photo of Wm. Sayer Blakely. 
Martin, Gov. John A., Atchison: Large photo group of officers of the 

Eighth Kansas Infantry, copied from a tin-type, taken at Fort Stevenson, 

Ala., in August, 1863. 
Mead, James P., Kingman : Lithographic views of Kingman as in 1883 

and 1886. 
Mellen, Geo. E., Gunnison, Col.: 43 stereoscopic views and nine cabinet 

photos of scenery in Colorado and the Northwestern States and Territories. 
Moore, Robert R., Topeka: Photograph of Worrall's carving of the Kan- 
sas State seal. 
Morris, Richard B., Atchison: Cabinet photo portrait of donor. 
Neelander, Edward, Lindsborg: Lithographic view of Bethany Normal 

Institute, at Lindsborg. 
Parsons, Luke F., Salina: Cabinet photo of Wm. H. Leeman, who was 

killed at Harper's Ferry at the time of the John Brown invasion. 
Plumb, Hon. P. B., Emporia: Engraved portraits of Gov. Robert J. Walker 

and Hon. John Sherman; engraved portrait of Gen. Winfield Scott; 

engraved portraits of Gen. John A. Rawlins ; engraved portraits of 

Gen. Phil. H. Sheridan. 
Redpath, James, New York city : Cabinet photo of donor. 
Riddle, J. R., Topeka: 22 photographic views in Colorado and New Mexico. 
Robinson, F. N., Howard, D. T.: Photograph of cyclone which occurred 

August 28, 1884, near Howard, Dakota. 
Russell, Edward, Lawrence : Cabinet portrait of donor. 
St. John, Gov. John P., Olathe : Cabinet photo of donor. 
St. John, Mrs. Gov. John P., Olathe: Life-size, gilt-framed, oil-painted 

portrait of Gov. St. John. 
Savage, Joseph, Lawrence: Photo portrait of Prof. Benj. F. Mudge. 
Sherman, Hon. John, Mansfield, Ohio: Life-size photo portrait of donor. 
Sherman, Gen. W. T., St. Louis, Mo.: Large photo portrait of donor. 
Simpson, Charles, Atchison : Cabinet photo of his mother, the late Mrs. 

Maria Simpson, daughter of Rev. Jothani Meeker, missionary, who was 

born at the Ottawa Mission, in Kansas, September 4, 1834. 
Snyder, A. J., Kansas City, Mo.: Engraving of Andy J. Snyder's Stock 

Yards, Kansas City, Mo. 
Thomson, Matt., Alma : Map of Wabaunsee county, with pictures of the 

school houses of the present time, and also of the earlier school houses in 

the county. 



42 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Vail, Bishop Thomas H., Topeka : Cabinet portrait of donor. 

Ware. Hon. E. F., Fort Scott: Large photo portrait of donor, " Ironquill." 

Waters, L. C, Topeka: Copy of Worrall's picture of drouthy Kansas. 

Waiigh, Rev. Lorenzo, Petahima, Cal.: Cabinet portrait of donor. 

Webb, Linus S., Topeka : Monograms of the Kansas Legislature for 1870 
and'l871. 

Webb, L. J., Topeka: Photo of Col. S. N. Wood and his party of rescuers 
returning from Texas. 

Weed, Geo. W., Toi)eka : PhoUigraphic view of the U. S. court house, To- 
peka, 1879; plans and drawings of the same, 21 in number. 

Wilcox, P. P., Denver, Col.: Photo portraits of donor, daughter and grand- 
daughters ; also stereos of Apache Bath and San Carlos Agency, Arizona 
Territory ; also photo of the Wilcox block, Denver, Col. 

Willard, Miss Frances E., Chicago, 111. : Large photo portrait of donor. 

Worcester, E. P., Colby, photo of "Thomas County Cat" printing office, a 
sod house. 

DONORS OF CURRENCY, SCRIP AND COIN. 

Ball, Mrs. Bell, Topeka ; One Chinese coin of the value of one-twelfth cent, 
U. S. money, and one of the value of one cent, U. S. money, procured of 
Kim Lung & Co., San Francisco, August, 1886. 

Barton, Edmond M., Worcester, Mass. : Three Confederate bonds of denom- 
inations $100, $500, $1,000; eight pieces Confederate scrip. 

Butterfield, J. Ware, Florence : Kansas State scrip, issued under the To- 
peka Constitution, and dated Jan. 17, 1856, in favor of Geo. W. Smith and 
signed by J. H. Lane, J. K. Goodin, and C. Robinson. 

Foster, Hon. C. G., Topeka : Ten-cent shinplaster given to donor at Pal- 
myra, Mo., in 1863. 

Ham, Gillespie, Willis : Copper anti-slavery medal with kneeling figure of 
a woman chained, with the inscription, "Am I not a woman and a sister?" 

Johnson, A. S., Topeka: One dollar Union military bond of the State of 
Missouri, dated June 1, 1865, (portrait of W. S. Moseley). 

Marflitt, Hawkins N., Topeka: Forty-dollar piece of Continental currency 
under act of Congress of Sept. 26, 1778. 

MeuUer, E., Topeka: Five-cent piece of fractional or postal currency. 

Miller, Hon. Sol., Troy : Book of blank certificates of the Drovers' Bank 
of Kansas, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, 185- ; book of blank drafts on 
same; ditto of certificates of deposit; fourteen bank notes as above, of de- 
nominations of $1, $2, $3, $5, and $10— outfit lor proposed bank in early 
Territorial times. 

ShelUm, Prof. E. M., Manhattan : Japanese shinplaster, an " Ichin " or one- 
fourth "boo," of the value of about six and one-fourth cents. 

Simison, E.H.. Minneapolis: Two-shillings-and-sixpence note, Pennsylva- 
nia colonial scrip, given donor by his grandfather. 

Smith, J. Kaufman, Topeka: Confederate five-dollar note issued at Rich- 
mo!M? Vir-inia, Sept. 2, 1861. 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 43 

Stevenson, R. B., lola : Two-dollar note of the Bullion Bank, Washington, 
D. C, dated July 4, 1862 ; one-dollar note of the City Bank, dated Leaven- 
worth City, K. T., Nov. 1, 1856. 

MISCELLANEOUS CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Abbott, James B., De Soto : Miniature arm chair made by donor from ma- 
hogany invalid chair once the property of Col. Samuel Young, who was 
prominent in the early politics of Kansas Territory. 

Adams, F. G., Topeka : Admission ticket to the Capital Grange social, Feb. 
9, 1876; certificate of membership in Kansas State Teachers' Association, 
July 27, 1865; admission ticket to the Tenth Annual Fair of Shawnee 
County Agricultural iSociety, Sept.-Oct., 1880. 

Aldrich, Charles W., Washington : Four posters, Washington County Fair, 
1885. 

Alward, Rev. E., Wathena: Circular to the Baptist churches, giving a 
history of the extinguishment and revival of the Baptist Northeast Kan- 
sas Association. 

Ball, Mrs. Bell, Topeka: Souvenir badge of reception committee of Shaw- 
nee county, appointed to receive the veterans passing through Topeka on 
their way to the National Encampment at San Francisco, August, 1886 ; 
Kansas G. A. R. badge worn at the Twentieth National Encampment, San 
Francisco, August, 1886 ; badge worn at the Fourth Kansas State En- 
campment, Fort Scott, March, 1885 ; menu of Baldwin Hotel, San Fran- 
cisco, August 3, 1886, Twentieth National Encampment; 31 cards of 
members of W. R. C. and G. A. R., attending the Twentieth National 
Encampment, San Francisco, 1886 ; piece of cork from the only cork tree 
ever known to grow on the Pacific coast of America, grown near Los 
Angeles, Cal. ; sea shells and water agate, picked up on the beach at Santa 
Monica, near Los Angeles, Cal., during the National Encampment ex- 
cursion, August, 1886 ; piece of backbone of a whale, one of the largest 
ever known, washed upon the beach 18 miles from Los Angeles, Cal., in 
1882 ; egg of marine animal washed on the beach of Santa Monica, Cali- 
fornia. The foregoing are memorials of the Twentieth National En- 
campment excursion, August, 1886. 

Bay ley, Samuel, Hartford : 9 fragments of ancient pottery, and 4 flint imple- 
ments, arrow-heads, etc., found in California township, Coffey county, in 
1885. 

Bean, Dr. J. V., Howard: Posters, etc., of Elk County (Kansas) Fair, 1886. 

Bowhay, Geo. H., Topeka: War lance with staff* highly ornamented with 
eagle feathers and scalp locks, once the property of Cloud Chief, a 
Cheyenne Indian, and carried by him at the battle on Little Big Horn 
river, Montana, in which General Custer and his command were killed, 
June 25, 1876 ; also medicine bonnet of Cheyenne medicine man. 

Brandley, Henry, Matfield Green: 40 circulars, blanks, etc., of Republican 
State Central Committee, 1886. 



44 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Butler, T. A., Lyons: Premium list and posters of the Rice County Fair 
Association, 1885. 

Campbell, J. B., Haddam: 12 election tickets, Presidential, State and 
county, Washington county, 1884, representing all parties. 

Carpenter, John C, Chanute: Libby prison receipt for $7.00, given to donor 
at Richmond, Va., June 23, 1863, signed by Thomas P. Turner, Captain. 

Cunningham, R. W., Lawrence: Complimentary ticket of admission to the 
Western National Fair, Lawrence, September, 1884; posters, etc., West- 
ern National Fair, Bismarck, 1885. 

De Geer, Mrs. M. E., Greeley Center: Specimen of iron pyrites from Greeley 
Center. 

Dickerson, Luther, Atchison: Arrow-head, of gun 'flint, found on the farm 
of donor, near Atchison, in 1885. 

Elliott, L. R., Manhattan: Printed circulars, etc., relating to the Republi- 
can National Anti-Saloon Conference, Chicago, September 16, 1886 ; 3 
circulars and blanks relating to the railroad strike at Parsons, March, 
1886; 3 National Prohibition election tickets, Kansas State election 1885; 
election tickets, "wet" and "dry," Prohibition election, Atlanta, Ga., No- 
vember 25, 1885. 

Fairchild, Pres't G. T., Manhattan : Card, commencement exercises of the 
Kansas State Agricultural College, June, 1886. 

Ferguson, William, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa.: A sword brought by 
Capt. John Brown to Kansas in 1855 or 1856, from Akron, O., and pre- 
sented by John Brown's sons to Otis Potter, of Lawrence, in 1856. 

Giles, F. W., Topeka: Folding metric rule, metre length, according to the 
standard metric system, for use in the library of the Society.. 

Greene, Hon. A. R., Lecompton : Fragment of Egyi)tian linen, 2,700 years 
old, taken from the mummy " Pempi," late of the necropolis at Thebes, 
presented to Mr. Greene by Prof. Moses Coyt Tyler, of Cornell Univer- 
sity ; fragment of bell tower stairway, of San Xavier Church, near Tuc- 
son, Arizona, built 1783-97 ; fragment of picket fence, now in ruins, 
which once inclosed the graves of the 17 U. S. soldiers killed at the battle of 
Taledega, Ala., 1815; fragment of the flag-staff at Fort Sumter, at the 
time the post was surrendered by Maj. Robert Anderson to the Confeder- 
ates, April 13th, 1861; fragment of granite from the Mormon Temple at 
Salt Lake City, Utah; bunch of sweet alyssum gathered from the graves 
of David C. Broderick and Gen. E. D. Baker in Lone Mountain ceme- 
tery, San Francisco, Cal. ; fragment of the altar rail of P^cos Church, 
near Santa Fe, New Mexico, built in the sixteenth century. 
Gillis, E. D., Rochester, N. Y. : Badgeof Grand Legion of New York Select 

Knights, A. O. U. W. 
Griffing, Wm. J., Manhattan : Three flint arrow-heads, two fragments of 
pottery, three flint scrapers, and one red sandstone utensil or ornament ; 
found by donor on the farm of E. B. Gilmore, near the mouth of Wild 
Cat creek, Riley county, Kansas. 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 45 

Heywood, Mrs. Maud, Greencastle, Mo. : Bead bag worked by one of Rev. 
Jotham Meeker's Indian pupils, who presented it to Mr. Meeker. Given 
by Peter Byram, of Atchison, to Mrs. Heywood. 

Hulbert, E. W., Fort Scott : Posters, etc., of Sixth Annual Fair of Bourbon 
county, October, 1886. 

Huling, A. S., Topeka : Passes to U. S. Cotton Exposition, New Orleans, 
1885, in name of donor. 

Jerome, F. E., Russell: Scrap-book with drawings, picture illustrations, 
and manuscript WTitings, made by donor in 1861. 

Johnson, Col. A. S., Topeka : The inkstand used by donor while a member 
of the first Territorial Legislature of Kansas, 1855. 

Kenea & Lane, La Cygne : Republican election tickets voted in Linn county, 
November 2, 1886. 

Leonhardt, Mrs. Esther, Manhattan : Election ticket under the Topeka Con- 
stitution, 1857; piece of Pasquotank county, North Carolina, scrip, $1.00, 
dated June 4, 1861. 

Maxwell, M. M., Valley Falls ; Posters, daily register, admission tickets, &c., 
Valley Falls District Fair, 1885. 

Miller, Mrs. H. E., Atlanta, Ga. : Badge of the " Wet " party at Atlanta, 
Ga., worn during the Prohibition canvass, 1886. 

Moriarty, F. A., Council Grove: Premium list, cards, etc., Golden Belt 
Trotting Circuit, Cpuncil Grove, September, 1886. 

Olney, Henry C, Gunnison, Col. : The gold pen with which the donor, as 
Chief Clerk of the Kansas House of Representatives, wrote his name as 
the first signature to the joint resolution by w^hich the Fifteenth Amend- 
ment to the constitution of the United States was ratified^by the Kansas 
Legislature, by vote of the House on the 18th of January, and of the 
Senate on the 19th of January, 1870. 

Page Bros., Ashland: New Year's card of the Republican-Herald, Ashland. 

Ranney & Forges, North Topeka : Large ancient implement, agricultural, 
7x21 inches, of flint or chert, found on the farm of James Hetzell, in the 
northwest part of Shawnee county. 

Sage, Frank L, Alma: Printer's "stick," with date "April 7, 1857" en- 
graved upon it. 

Shaflfer, John B., Ottawa : Four posters Franklin County Fair, 1885. 

Sherman, Hon. John, Mansfield, O.: Original scrap-book prepared for the 
use of the Kansas Congressional Committee of 1856, for the investigation 
of the troubles in Kansas, containing newspaper clippings relating wholly 
to Kansas — 143 pages. 

Skinner, Daniel S., Topeka: Buckskin coat, embroidered and fringed, taken 
from a Seminole or Creek chief, at a battle during the war between those 
tribes of Indians and the United States ; given the donor by his uncle, 
D. G. Skinner, who was at the battle. 

Smith, Geo. W., Topeka: Tenth Annual Commandery, Grand Lodge A. 



46 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



F. and A. M.. Kansas, Tenth Annual Communication, July 14, 1885., 
hand-bill announcement. 

Smith, P. W.. Hays City: Nine posters, tickets of admission, postal cards, 
etc., of Fair of Western Kansas Agricultural Association at Hays City, 
September, 1885. 

Stotler, Jacob, Emiwria : Card— Observance of donor's twenty-fifth wed- 
ding annivei'sary. 

Town, Isaac N., Calabasas, Arizona : Apache hoi-se-shoe and canteen, picked 
up by donor May 24, 1886, on the trail made by Geronimo and his band 
between Tubac and the Aqua Caliente, Santa Rita mountains. 

Turrell, Nymphas, Topeka: Cane made from the timber of Ericsson's mon- 
itor. 

Tyrrell, Wm., Santa Cruz, Cal.: Buffalo Bill's horn, procured by donor at 
Fort Lamed in 1872. 

Walker, Geo., Burlington: Stone Indian pipe, catlinite, of large size, found 
by donor on the prairie in the southern part of Lane county, Kansas, 
August 19, 1885. 

Wells, Welcome, Manhattan: 11 Indian relics, flint spear-heads, knives, 
etc., found on the site of the Kaw Indian village near Manhattan. 

Wilder, D. W., Topeka : Sample of the first printing ever done at Santa F6, 
New Mexico, 1834, given to donor by Samuel Ellison, October, 1886 ; 
time table for the present century. • 

Wilson, W. J., Winfield: Tickets of admission to Cowley County Fair, Sep- 
tember, 1886. 

Young, Grove, Higginsville, Mo.: Skin of his cavalry horse, war of the Re- 
bellion, Fifth Kansas Cavalry. 

VOLUMES OF NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, DONATED. 

The American Anticjuarian Society, Worcester, Mass., Edmund M. Barton, 
Librarian ; The Signs of the Times, Oakland, Cal., from January 7 to 
June 24, 1886; Bost n Morning Post, 22 numbers of the years 1838 and 
1839; New England Farmer, Boston, partial files from 1860-1862 ; the 
Christian Register, Boston, partial files for the years 1869, and 1876-1881 ; 
Journal of Chemistry, Boston, partial files from 1869-1871 ; Boston Daily 
Glol)e, partial file.< for the years 1876, and 1883 to 1885; Boston Herald, 
partial files from 1883-1886 ; The Evening Traveler, daily, Boston, 1 vol., 
January to June, 1886 ; Commercial Bulletin, Boston, partial file, 1886 ; The 
Massachusetts Spy, weekly, Worcester, January 9 to December 25, 1822; 
Worcester Daily Spy, 38 volumes, from January to December, 1859, from 
January 1868, to December 1884, and from July 1885, to July 1886, and 
13 duplicate volumes of the same; National ^gis, Worcester, 6 vols., 
1825, 1826, 1830, 1838-1840, and a few copies of 1810 and 1811 ; also 
duplicate volumes for 1825, 1830, 1838-1840; Massachusetts Yeoman, 
Worcester, nearly complete files from 1827-1830, and partial files from 
1823-1826, also duplicates from 1827-1830; Worcester Republican, 



Fifth Biennial repobt. 47 

partial files for the year 1830 and from 1834-1837 ; Daily Transcript, 
Worcester, 6 vols., 1853-1855; Worcester Evening Gazette, 38 vols., 
from January 1828 to December 1866, from January 1867 to July 18, 

1881, and from January 1882 to December 1885, and 2 duplicate vols. ; 
Worcester Daily Press, 8 vols., from June 1873 to June 1877, and partial 
files of 1877 find 1878 ; The Fitchburg Sentinel, Mass., partial file for 
1886; American Agriculturist, New York, partial file 1867; The Spec- 
tator, New York and Chicago (monthly), 11 vols., from 1870-1880, and 
4^ duplicate copies ; The Iron Age, New York, 1 vol., r876, complete, 
and partial files for 1875, 1877 and 1879; Commercial and Financial 
Chronicle, New York, partial files 1880 and 1884; The Voice, New York, 
from January 7 to June 24, 1886 ; files of the National Era, Washington, 
D. C, 1851-1854, 4 vols., and duplicates of 1852 and 1853, 6 vols, in all. 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Boston, Mass.: 
Missionary Herald, 1821-1884, vols. 17 to 80, 63 vols. 

Anthony, Miss Susan B., Rochester, N. Y. : Files of the Revolution, New 
York, vols. 1-5, 1868-70 ; files of the Ballot Box and National Citizen, 
Toledo, O., and Syracuse, N. Y., vols. 1-6, 1876-1881 : 11 vols, in all. 

Baker, F. P., Topeka: 65 bound newspaper files, namely: Of the State Rec- 
ord, daily, Topeka, from June 3, 1868, to November 28, 1871, 10 vols.; 
of the Weekly State Record, from November 5, 1859, to April 28, 1875, 
9 vols.; of the Daily Commonwealth, from May 1, 1869, to December 31, 

1882, 31 vols.; of the Weekly Commonwealth, from July 4, 1874, to De- 
cember 30, 1880, 9 vols.; Topeka Daily Times, from March 27 to May 5, 
1876; Topeka Daily Citizen, April and May, 1885; State Fair Record, 
daily, September 11-15, 1871; Topeka Daily Blade, from November 13, 
1876, to March 28, 1877; New York Tribune, from April 28 to Decem- 
eer 29, 1869; New York Independent, from August 6 to December 19, 
1868. 

Baker, F. P. & Sons, Topeka: Bound files of the Daily Commonwealth for 
1885 and 1886, and weekly for 1885. 

Baker, Dr. W. S., Topeka: Files of New York Semi- Weekly Tribune, 1877, 
1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882 and 1885 complete, 7 vols. 

Beers, Dr. Geo. L., Topeka : Files of the Christian Union, New York, Oc- 
tober 5, 1882, to June 10, 1886, 4 vols.; files of the New York Independ- 
ent from March 24, 1881, to June 10, 1886, 5 vols.; The Christian 
Advocate New York, from April 23, 1885,to June 17, 1886, 2 vols. 

Bishop, James F., Huron, Dakota: File of the Dakota Teacher, Huron, 
August, 1885, to June, 1886. 

Boston Public Library, Boston, Mass., Arthur Knapp, assistant librarian, 
97 volumes of Massachusetts Newspaper Files, namely: The Boston 
Chronicle, Dec. 21, 1767, to Dec. 19, 1768 ; Federal Orrery, Boston, Oct. 
20, 1794, to April 18, 1796, and scattering duplicates, from Oct. 20, 1794, 
to October 12, 1795; Massachusetts Mercury, Boston, May 11, 1798, to 



48 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



August 9, 1799; Columbian Centinel and Massachusetts Federalist, Bos- 
ton, from June 29, 1779, to Aug. 31, 1805, from Jan. 3, 1807, to Oct. 3, 
1810, from Jan. 2, 1811, to July 1, 1812, and scattering duplicates, from 
Feb. 28, 1801, to Dec. 29, 1802 ; The Independent Chronicle and the 
Universal Advertiser, Boston, from Jan. 1, 1798, to Dec. 17, 1801 ; The 
Independent Chronicle, Boston, from Dec. 21, 1801, to Dec. 30, 1804; 
Boston Patriot, from Apiil 7, 1809, to Sept. 12, 1810, from March 2 to 
Dec. 25, 1811, from March 14, 1812, to Sept. 8, 1813, and scattering du- 
plicates, from March 3, 1809, to March 10, 1813 ; Independent Chronicle 
and Boston Patriot (semi-weekly), from Jan. 11, 1832, to Aug. 10, 1837; 
American Republican, Boston, from March 13 to April 7, 1809; Boston 
Gazette, from Jan. 9 to Oct. 29, 1804, from Aug. 19, 1815, to Aug. 19, 
1816, from Dec. 27, 1817, to Dec. 25, 1819, from April 23, 1827, to Nov. 
28,1828; Boston Spectator, from Jan. 4, 1814, to Feb. 5, 1815; Boston 
Commercial Gazette (daily), from Dec. 29, 1817, to Dec. 25, 1819; New 
England Galaxy, Boston, from Oct. 31, 1823, to Dec. 26, 1828, and scat- 
tering duplicates, Oct. 15, 1824, to April 6, 1827 ; Boston Recorder, from 
Jan. 2, 1832, to Dec. 25, 1835; Evening Journal, Boston, from Jan. 3, 
1837, to Dec. 30, 1843, from Jan. 4 to Dec. 30, 1844, and from Feb. 4 to 
Dec. 30, 1845 ; The Commonwealth (daily), Boston, from Jan 1 to July 
3, 1851, from Jan. 1 to Sept. 21, 1854, and the weekly from Sept. 1, 1866, 
to Aug. 28, 1869 ; Youth's Companion, Boston, from Oct. 21, 1852, to 
April 17, 1856; Evening Telegraph (daily), Boston, from Sept. 27, 1854, 
to March 31, 1855; Anglo-Saxon, Boston, from Jan. 5, 1856, to Dec. 13, 
1856; The Atlas and Daily Bee, Boston, from June 15 to Dec. 31, 1858; 
The National J^gis, Worcester, Mass.,from Dec. 2, 1801, to Dec. 25, 1811, 
from Jan. 20, 1813, to May 4, 1814, from Jan. 5, 1815, to Dec. 25,1816, 
and from Dec. 15, 1824, to June 8, 1825 ; Essex Register, Salem, Mass., 
from Jan. 1 to Dec. 17, 1817 ; The Emancipator, New York city, N. Y., 
from Feb. 3, 1837, to Feb. 14, 1839; The Christian Union, New York, 
from July 6 to Dec. 28, 1882. 

Boughton, J. S., Lawrence: Files of the Kansas Monthly, Lawrence, vols. 
2, 3 and 4, 1879, 1880, 1881 ; files of "Once a Week," Lawrence, January 
6, 1883, to August 9, 1884, 2 vols. 

Brown <fe Holland, Chicago: Brown & Holland's Shorthand News, vols. 
3 and 4, 1884, 1885. 

Diplomatic Review, London, England, publishers of: Files of the Review, 
vols. 1 to 25, 1855-1877, 25 vols. 

Egle, Dr. William H., Harrisburg, Pa.: Vols. 1 and 2 of the Historical 
Register; Notes and Queries, Historical and Genealogical, relating to the 
interior of Pennsylvania, quarterly, 1883 and 1884. 

Fairchild, President, Geo. T., Manhattan: Vols. 10 and 11 of the Indus- 
trialist, Manhattan, from August 23, 1884, to July 10, 1886. 

Garrison, Francis J., Roxbury, Mass : 28 vols, of " The Liberator," (William 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 49 

Lloyd Garrison's newspaper,) Boston, for the years 1833, 1838, and from 
1840 to 1865, inclusive. 

Graham, Andrew J., New York: Vol. 15, of the Student's Journal, New^ 
York, 1885, 1886. 

Green, Dr. Samuel A., Boston, Mass. : 102 vols, of the North American 
Review, Boston, between the years 1821 and 1867; 18 vols, of the Christian 
Examiner, Boston, vol. 1-19, 1824-1836; and 12 vols, of the same, be- 
tween the years 1840 and 1867; 5 vols, of the Quarterly Journal of the 
American Unitarian Association, Boston, 1854 to 1859; 9 vols, of the 
Monthly Journal of the American Unitarian Association, from 1860 to 
1869. 

Hagaman, J. M., Concordia: File of the Concordia Daily Blade, December 
22, 1884, to February 7, 1885, vol. 1, Nos. 1-36. 

Hamblin, T. Frank, Ottawa: Ottawa Campus, vols. 1 and 2, December 1864, 
to June 1886. 

Hanes, D. C, Ottawa: The Assembly Herald, daily, Ottawa, June 23 to 
July 3, 1885, containing proceedings of the Sunday School Assembly. 

Hick, Hon. R. S., Louisville: File of the Louisville Reporter, October 6, 
1870, vol. 1, No. 2, ta September 24, 1880, vol. 10, No. 52, (lacking from 
September 13, 1877, to January 16, 1879.) 

Hillman, R. L., Minneapolis : File of the Daily Institute, Minneapolis, 
Nos. 1-20, July 7 to August 1, 1885. 

Jefferies, John J., & Co., Ottawa: Files of Jefferies' Western Monthly, Ot- 
tawa, August, 1884, to July, 1885, and 3 pieces of music, 1 vol. 

Maloy, John, Council Grove: The Crisis, Columbus, O., Samuel Medary, 
editor, from January 31, 1861, to January 23, 1863, 2 vols.; Kendall's 
Expositor, Washington, D. C, from February 3, 1841, to December 16, 
1841. 

Miller, Prof. E., Lawrence : File of the University Review, Lawrence, Sep- 
tember, 1884, to June, 1885. 

Mills, T. B., Las Vegas, New Mexico: Bound files of Mills & Smith's 
Real Estate Advertiser, Topeka, vols. 1-4, from October, 1867, to De- 
cember, 1870. 

Tomlinson, Charles H., San Diego, Cal. : The Century Magazine, vols. 30, 
31 and 32, and Nos. 5 and 6 of vol. 29, 1885-1886. 

Tyrrell, William, Santa Cruz, California: 2 vols. Putnam's Monthly, 1853; 
4 vols. Boston Journal of Chemistry, 1873-1877 ; 8 vols. Harper's Monthly 
Magazine, 1851-1854; 3 vols. New York Nation, 1878-1882; files of the 
Nation, broken, 1883, 1884 and 1885, and December 7 and 21, 1882, 98 
copies. 

Waters, L. C, Topeka: Files of the New York Independent from 1873 to 
1883, and a few numbers in 1884, 11 vols. 



50 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 

The following is a statement of bound newspaper files, and bound volumes 
of periodicals in the library of the Society, January 18, 1887, numbering 
5 986 volumes ; of which 4,292 are of Kansas, and 1,694 are of other States 
aiid countries, and of which 2,251 have been added during the two years 
covered by this report. (, Volumes not otherwise described are of weekly 
newspajMjrs.) 



i>1;ND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS. 



Netospapers. 



ALLEN COUNTY. 



loU Register 




.yien County Independent, lola i««ri«x« 

;V''"K!;mfrr""''^°** ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::i i87J:!886 

tluroboldt Union i nj7fl_,aaR 

Inter-State, Iluraboldl 

Independent Press, Humboldt 

Moran Herald 



ANDKRSON COUNTY. 

tJamett Weekly Journal 

(iarnett Plalndealer 

Anderson County Republican, Garnett 

llepubllcan-Plaindealer, Garnett 

Anderson County Democrat, Garnett ; 

rhe (Jrceley Tribune 

Iht(;reeley News 

rhe Colony Free Press 

Westphalia Times 

Kincaid Kronicle 



187 

1882 
1885, 1836 



ATCHISON COUNTY. 

Squatter Sovereign, Atchison 

Freedom's Champion, (1861 lacking,) Atchison 

Atchison Dally Iree Press 

Atchison Weekly Free Press, (four files each of 1866 and 1867,).... 

Champion and Press (weekly), Atchison 

Atchison Daily Champion 

Atchison Wt'ckly Champion, ( lacking from 1878-1885,) 

Kansas Zeitung, Atchison, i duplicates of vol. 1 ) 

Atchison Iniou, (broken files,) 

Atchison Patriot, daily, (from July, 1876, to July, 1879, lacking,). 

Atchison Patriot, weekly 

Atchison Courier 

Atchison Glol»e, daily 

Atchlsoolan, Atchison 

Vtchlson Banner 

rhe New West, Atchison... 



The Sunday Morning Call, Atchison. 
Atchison Telegraph. 



Kansas Stants-Anr-clger, Atchison... 

\ irtial, dailv 

ri,ury Atchison 

A iiday Siorning Sermon. 
The Western Recorder, Atchison.... 
The Trades-Union, Atchison 



BARBER COUNTY. 

Karlter County Mail, Medicine Lodge 

Medicine Ix>dge Cresset 

The Barber County Index, Medicine Lodge 

Harelion Eiipr««s 

.,-1- i-i — i»„,..i,i 



1. New Kiowa.. 



iiy.. 



Kansas i*rairle Dog, Lake City. 



1876-1886 
1876-1884 
1883, 1884 
1884-1886 
1885, 1886 
1880, 1881 
1881-1886 
1882-1886 
1885, 1886 



1856, 1857 
1857-1863 



18';5-1868 
1868-1878 
1876-1886 
1873-1886 
1857, 1858 
1859-1861 
1876-1886 
1874-1886 
1876-1879 
1878-1886 

1877 
1878, 1879 
1878-1880 
1882,1883 

1882 
1881-1886 
1881,1882 
1884-1886 

1884 

1884 
1885, 1886 



1878, 1879 
1879-1886 
1881-1886 
1884-1886 
1884-1886 
1884-1886 
1884-1886 
1885,1886 
1885,1886 



Fifth biennial Repoet. 



51 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continued. 



Newspapers. 



Years. 



BARTON COUNTY, 

Great Bend Register 

Inland Tribune, Great Bend 

Arkansas Valley Democrat, Great Bend 

Kansas Volksfreund, Great Bend 

The Ellsworth Express 

Pawnee Rock Leader 



BOURBON COUNTY. 

Fort Scott Daily Monitor 

Fort Scott Weekly Monitor (1869-1876 lacking) 

Fort Scott Pioneer 

Camp's Emigrant's Guide, Fort ScoLt 

New Century, Fort Scott 

The Fort Scott Herald 

Republican-Record, Fort Scott 

Herald and Record, Fort Scott 

Evening Herald, daily, Fort Scott 

Medical Index, monthly, Fort Scott 

The Banner, Fort Scott 

Fort Scott Daily Tribune 

Fort Scott Weekly Tribune 

Bronson Pilot 

The Fulton Independent 

The Telephone, Uniontown 

The Garland Gleaner 

Kansas Staats-Zeitung, Fort Scott 



Hiawatha Dispatch 

The Hiawatha World , 

Kansas Herald, Hiawatha 

The Kansas Sun, Hiawatha 

Weekly Messenger, Hiawatha 

The Kansas Democrat, Hiawatha. 
Everest Reflector 



BROWN COUNTY. 



BUTLER COUNTY. 



Augusta Republican, (1875-1880 lacking,). 

Southern Kansas Gazette, Augusta 

Augusta Advance 

Augusta Electric Light 

Walnut Valley Times, El Dorado 

El Dorado Press 

El Dorado Daily Republican 

El Dorado Republican.... 

Butler County Democrat, El Dorado 

The El Dorado Eagle 

The New Enterprise, Douglass 

Douglass Index 

The Douglass Tribune 

Leon Indicator 

The Leon Quill 

The Benton Reporter 

The Towanda Herald 

The Brainerd Sun 

L3,tham Journal 



CHASE COUNTY. 

Chase County Courant, Cottonwood Falls.. 

Chase County Leader, Cottonwood Falls 

Strong City Independent 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY. 

Chautauqua Journal, Sedan 

The Chautauqua County Times, Sedan 

Sedan Times , 

Sedan Times-Journal 

The Border Slogan, Sedan 

The Graphic, Sedan 

Chautauqua News, Peru 

The Peru Times ; 

The Chautauqua Springs Spy , 

The Cedar Vale Star , 



Republican-Courier, Columbus.. 
The Columbus Courier 



CHEROKEE COUNTy. 



1876-1886 


11 


1876-1886 


11 


1877-1882 


6 


1878, 1879 


1 


1878-1886 


8 


1886 


1 


lSHO-1886 


14 


1867-1886 


12 


1876-1878 


2 


1877 


1 


1877,1878 


1 


1878-1882 


5 


1879-1882 


4 


1882-1884 


2 


1882-1885 


6 


1881-1884 


4 


1882-1884 


2 


1884-1886 


4 


1884-1886 


2 


1884-1886 


2 


1884-1886 


2 


188."), 1886 


1 


1886 


1 


1886 


1 


1876-1882 


6 


1882-1886 


5 


1876-1883 


8 


1879, 1880 
1882-1884 


2 




1884-1886 


3 


188o, 1886 




1873-1883 


4 


1876-1886 


11 


1883, 1884 


1 


1884-1886 


2 


1874-1886 


13 


1877-1883 


7 


1885-1886 


3 


1883-1886 


3 


1881-1886 


6 


1882 


1 


1879,1880 
1880-1883 
1884-1886 
1880-1886 


2 


3 


s 


6 


1886 


1 


1884,1885 
1885, 1886 
1885, 1886 
1885, 1886 


1 
2 
1 
1 


1874-1886 


12 


1875-1886 


12 


1881-1886 


5 


1875-1884 


9 


1878-1881 


3 


1882-1884 


3 


1885, 1886 


2 


1883, 1884 
1884-1886 




1877-1881 




1886, 1887 
1882,1883 
1884-1886 


3 


1876-1878 


3 


1879-1886 


8 



52 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



BOUND NEU'SPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS -Continued. 



Ifeiespapera. 




CHEROKEE COUNTY — Owc/udcJ. 

Columbus Democrat 

Border Star, Col uuibu*. 

The Columbus Vldette 

The Times. Columbus ~ 

Kansas liee-KeeiK-r, Columbus 

I>ea'« Coluujbus Advocate 

The Dailv Advocate, Columbus 

The Daily News and The Weekly News, Columbus 

The Expository, (iirard and Columbus :.... 

The Snrij; of .Vhrtle ( monthly ), Columbus 

The Kansa.s Prohibitionist, Columbus 

Baxter Springs Repul^ican 

The Times, liaxter Springs 

Baxter Springs News 

Galena Miner ^ 

Short Creek Weekly Banner, Galena 

The Galena Messenger 

Short Creek Heuubllcau, Galena 

Empire City Echo '. 

The Ionian Casket (monthly), Quakervale 

Western Friend ( montblv ), Quakervale 

The Laborer's Tribune, Weir 

CHEYENNE COUNTY. 

Cheyenne County Rustler, Wano 

CLARK COUNTY. 

Clark Countv Clipper, Ashland 

Republican HeraM, Ashland 

Clark County Chief, Englewood 

Appleton Kansas Era 

CLAY COUNTY. 

aay County Dispatch, Clav Center 

The Ixx«llst, Clay Center ' 

The Democrat, Clav Center -. 

The Cresaet, Clay Center 

The Times, Clav Center 

The Times (daily ), Clay Center !.!..'.*.'.*.".*.*.'.'.'.'.*.' 

The Kansas Hautist, Clay Center 

The Monitor, Clay Center !..!!!!!!."!!.'!!!!!*" 

Clay Center Eagle '."'.!*.*.!!!"!'.!!!!!!!' 

Morganrllle News and Sunflower .'.."!!."*.'.*.'."!.*.'.'.''."*.'..".!!*.!*.'. 

CLOUD COUNTY. 

Republican Valley Empire, Clyde and Concordia 

Concordia Empire 

The Republican-Empire, Concordia "V.V. 

The Concordia RepuMican .'."'.".'.'.'.*.*..".'.'.'.'.'."!!.'."!!.'.' 

Tbe Concordia Expositor !.!!!!!'.!!'.!!!!!!!!!!! 

The Cloud County Hlade, Concordia '.'..'...'..'.'.'....'. 

Kansas Blade, Concordia \\[ 

Concordia Daily Hlade (vol.1. No. 1—86) ...!!!!!!.".!!!..,' '"* 

Cloud Countv Critic, Concordia 

The Concortlia Tiuiea '* 

TheClrde Herald ;;;;.;; 

Clyde Uemocrat ' 

Cline's Prcaa, Clyde ".'.'.'."Z 

The Clyde Mall.:. "!!... '....■."."'!;; 

(ilsistti Tribune „ |//' 

* Kansan, Jamestown.!.*.'.'."*////////.'"'.... 

1 1 lie News 

Milton vale Star 

Amec Advocate ...........,"!!...'..'.', ".."./.".'i 

... . ... COFFEY COUNTY. 

Neoeho \ alley Register, Burlington 

?■"?■* .^■*'1?*' ^"/iJngton, (duplicate of i86f)'/!*./.'.'.'/*.!!!'//"^"'"!|.\\\7//||;;""';"'\* 

1' an '..././/.!.'.".".*/*/!// 

!| riot, Burlington ..'..........*.'..**.'.*.'..'.* 

T ''• ' " I 'II independent ' 

Kiirliii^i .1. Diiily Star */ • 

Iatov l;t pwrit-r 

Tbt Ia!U> Light • - 

The Warerly Newa ' 



1876 
1877-1886 
1877, 1878 



1882-1886 
1886, 1887 



1883-1885 

1886 

1876,1877 

1878-1881 

1882-1886 

1877-1880 

1878 

1879 

1883-1886 

1877-1879 

1878, 1879 

1880-1886 

1884-1886 



1885, 1886 



1884-1886 

1886 

1885, 1886 

1885. 1886 



1876-1886 
1879-1881 
1879, 1880 

1882. 1883 
1882-1886 

1886 
1881-1884 

1883. 1884 
1885,1886 
1835, 1886 



1870-1872 
1876-1882 
1883-1886 
1882,1883 
1877-1881 
1879-1881 
1882-1886 
1884, 1885 
1882-1886 
1884-1886 
1878-1886 
1880-1882 
1884 
1884-1886 
1881,1882 
1883-1886 
1881-1886 
1882-1886 



1859, 1860 
1864-1868 
1876-1886 
1882-1886 

1886 
1876-1886 

1878 
1879-1886 
1884-1886 
1885, 1886 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 



53 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 



COMANCHE COUNTY. 



Comanche Chieftain, Nescatunga... 
The Western Kausan, Nescatunga. 

Nescatunga Enterprise 

Coldwater Review 

The Western Star, Coldwater., , 

Comanche County Citizen, Avilla.., 

Protection Echo 

Evansville Herald 



COWLEY COUNTY. 

Winfield Courier 

Winfield Daily Courier 

Winfield Plow and Anvil 

-Cowley County Telegram, Winfield 

Winfield Daily Telegram 

Winfield Semi -Weekly 

Cowley County Monitor, Winfield 

Cowley Countv Courant, Winfield 

Winfield Daily Courant 

The Daily Visitor, Winfield 

The Winfield Tribune 

Arkansas City Traveller 

Arkansas Valley Democrat. Arkansas City 

The Arkansas City Republican 

The New Enterprise, Burden 

Burden Enterprise 

Burden Eagle 

Cambridge Commercial 

The News, Cambridge 

The Eye, Dexter 

The Udall Sentinel 

TheUdall Record 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

Girard Press 

Crawford County ^ews, Girard 

Girard Herald 

The Kansas Workman, monthly, Girard 

Cherokee Index 

The Young Cherokee, Cherokee 

Cherokee Banner 

The Temperance Rural, Cherokee 

Sentinel on the Border, Cherokee 

The Cherokee Sentinel 

The Saturday Cyclone, Cherokee 

The Smelter, Pittsburg 

The Headlight, Pittsburg 

The McCune Standard 

The McCune Times 

The Brick, McCune 

Walnut Journal 

The Educational Advocate, Walnut 

The Arcadia Reporter 

The Hepler Leader 

The Farlington Plaindealer 



DAVIS COUNTY. 



Junction City Union, (triplicates of '75, '76, '77, '78, and duplicates of '79-'86,). 

-Junction City Tribune 

The Youths' Casket, monthly. Junction City 

Davis County Republican, Junction City 



DECATUR COUNTY. 



The Oberlin Herald 

The Eye, Oberlin 

The Oberlin World and Democrat. 
The Norcatur Register 



DICKINSON COUNTY. 

Dickinson County Chronicle, Abilene 

Kansas Gazette, Enterprise and Abilene 

Abilene Daily Gazette 

The Weekly Democrat, Abilene 

The Abilene Reflector 

The Solomon Sentinel, Solomon City 

Enterprise Register 

The Anti-Monopolist, Enterprise 




1884-1886 
1885, 1886 
1886 
1884-1886 
1885,1886 
1885, 1886 
1885, 1886 
1885. 1886 



1874-1886 
1885, 1886 
1876 
1876-1886 
1879-1882 

1879. 1880 
1880 

1881,1882 
1881,1882 
1886 
1884-1886 
1876-1886 
1879-1886 
1884-1886 I 

1880.1881 1 
1882-1886 I 
1885, 1886 

1881 
1882-1886 

1884. 1885 

1885. 1886 



1874-1886 
1876-1880 
1880-1886 
1882-1884 
1876,1877 
1876,1877 
1877, 1878 

1879 
1879-1882 
1883-1886 
1885, 1886 
1881-1886 

1886 
1881,1882 
1882-1886 

1886 
1882-1886 

1884 
1882-1886 

1883 
1885, 1886 



1865-1886 

1873-1886 

1878 

1882-1886 

1879-1886 
1883-1886 
1885, 1886 



1876-1886 
1876-1886 
1886 
1880-1882 
1883-1886 
1879-1886 
1883, 1884 



54 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




DICKINSON oovvTy — Concluded. 



The Chapman SUr 

The Herlngton Tribune., 

The Hope Herald 

The Hoi»e l»i>patch 



DONIPHAN COUNTY. 



While Cloud Chief, ( 7 duplicates,) 

Weekly KanHas Chief, Troy, ( 1 duplicate,) 

Trov Hept»rter 

Doniphan County Republican, Troy, ( 1873 lacking,) 

Troy Weekly Hulletin 

Elwuod Advertiser, ( 1 duplicate.) 

Kaii.sas Free Tresg, Elwood, ( 1 duplicate,) 

Klwood Free Press, ( 1 duplicate,) 

Walhtna Reporter, ( 1868-1873 lacking,) 

Hi(;liland Sentinel 

The < entral Slate, Highland 

While Cloud Review 

Enterprise, SeTerance, ( and Centralia, Nemaha county,). 



DOUGLAS COUNTY. 



Herald of Freedom. Lawrence, (duplicates.) 

Kansas Free-State, I>awrence 

Lawrence Republican, (volumes 1 and 3, incomplete,). 

The WeMern Home .lournal, I^wrence 

The Weekly Kansas Journal, Lawrence 

Republicau-.lournal, daily, Lawrence 

Lawrence Daily .Journal 



The Concregaiional Record, monthly, (Lawrence, January, 1859, to December, 1864 
Topeka, June, 18"' ' 



1865, to May, 1867,) 

The Tribune, Lawrence, (lacking 1873 and 1875,) 

The Semi-Weekly Tribune, and the Weekly Herald-Tribune, Lawrence 

The Lawrence Tribune 

The Tribune, daily. ( 1875,1878, 1879, and part of 1877 lacking; duplicates,) Lawrence 

Herald-Tribune, daily, Lawrence 

Evening Tribune, Lawrence 

i^jiirit of KannaH, Lawrence 

Kansas ("ollegiaie, Lawrence 

The I'nivcrsiiy Courier, l^wrence 

Univer^ily Courier, I^awrence 

The Kansas Review, monthly, Lawrence 

Lawrence Standard 

Kansas Monthly, I^wrence ."....!.'.*.'.'.'.!!"."!.'!! 

The Dally ReiMjrier, Lawrence !.."!!!"**."!'.'.' 

Kansas Tenij>erance Palladium, Lawrenctf '.'.'.!!!!!!"*.*! 

I>ie (iemiania, l^awrence '.'.'. 

The Kansas Liberal, monthly, Lawrence, July to Septemher,'l88y,T8ee'v^^ 

The I^awreuceCazeite.. 

Lawrence Daily Gazette ."."'.*."'.* 

Weaiern Recorder, I^wrence i...."!.!!!.".'.*...."!!!"!!"!!!!"!!!!!!!!!!!! 

Kansas Churchman, monthly, I^awrenoe !.*.*.".*.'.«"!!!!!!!!!'"'! 

Kansas Daily Herald. I^iwrence .!.."!...."." 

The Head ( enter and Daily Morning Sun, Lawrence .."!*.!".'...'.*".* 

The Daily Morning News, I^wrence 

Once a Week. Lawrence 



The Kansas Zephyr, Ijiwrence 

North Ijiwrence l^m 



, ^ l>eader 

Freeman's ( hampion, Prairie City 

Baldwin Criterion 

The Baldwin Visitor '. 

The Baldwin Ixidger 

The Baldwin Index, Baker UnlversUy*"!''""*.*.'."*.'.!."'."*.'! 

Lecompton Monitor „ 



Edwards County I>eader, Kinsley 
\ alley Republican, ( bound with 

KlnM. V irci.iil.ti. jin 



EDWARDS COUNTY. 



•an 
' i'ic, (except 188 

n-(;rnnliic 

■ ng, Kinsley... 

i he Kitl^lly Mercury .„., 

The Wendell Champion ««. . 



Kinsley Graphic, 1878,). 



1884-1886 
1885,1886 
1885, 1886 



1857-1872 
1876-1886 
1866,1867 
1871-1875 
1877-1H79 

1857. 1858 

1858. 1859 
18.19-1861 
1867-1877 
1878,1879 
1880-1882 



1854-1859 
1855,1856 
1857-1860 
1869-1884 
1886 
1877-1880 
1880-1886 

1859-1867 
1868-1883 
1884,1885 
1885, 1886 
1873-1884 
1884, 1885 

1886 
1875-1882 
1875-1879 
1878,1879 
1882-1886 
1879-1886 
1877-1879 
1878-1881 

1879 
1879, 1880 
1880-1886 

1882-1886 
1884,1885 
1883,1884 
1883-1886 
1883-1884 

1883 
1883,1884 
1883-1885 
1884-1886 
1884,1885 
1857, 1858 
1883-1885 

1884 



1885, 1886 



1877-1880 
1877,1878 
1878-1881 
1878 1886 
1882 
1878-1879 
1883-1886 
1885-1886 



Fifth Biennial Repoet, 



55 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 



ELK COUNTY. 



The Courant, Howard 

The Courant-Ledger, Howard 

Industrial Journal, Howard 

The Howard Courunt 

Kansas Rural, Howard 

The Howard Journal 

The Howard Democrat 

Elk County Ledger, Elk Falls, 

The Weekly Examiner, Elk Falls.. 

Elk Falls .Signal 

The Pioneer, Longton 

The Times, Longton 

Moline News 

Moline Mercury 

The Moline Free Press 

Grenola Argus 

The Grenola Chief. 

Grip, Howard 

The Cave Springs Globe , 

The Herald, Cana Valley 

The Grenola Hornet 

Cain City News 



Years. 



1875-1877 
1878-1880 
1878-1880 
1880-1886 

1881 
1880-1883 
1884-1886 
1876, 1877 

1878 
1880-1882 
1880,1881 
1881-1886 

1880 

1882 
1883-1885 
1880,1882 
1883-1886 

1883. 1884 
1882 

1882,1883 

1884. 1885 
1884-1886 



ELLIS COUNTY. 

Ellis County Star, ( lacking from Dec. 7, 1876, to April 11, 1879,) Hays City. 

Hays Sentinel, Hays City 

The Star-Sentinel, Hays City 

German-American Advocate, Hays City 

Ellis Weekly Headlight, Hays City 

Hays City Times, Hays City 

Ellis County Democrat and Ellis County Free Press, Hays City 

Ellis Review, Hays City 



The Rural West, Ellsworth. 

The Ellsworth News 

The Ellsworth Democrat. 

Wilson Index 

The Wilson Kcho 

The Wilson Wonder 

Cain City News 



FINNEY COUNTY, 

The Irrigator, Garden City 

Garden City Herald 

Garden City Herald, daily 

Garden City Sentinel „ , 

Garden City Sentinel, daily 

The Cultivator and Herdsman, monthly and weekly, Garden City. 

The Western Times, Garden City 

Lakin Herald 

The Kearney County Advocate, Lakin 

The Pioneer Democrat 

lyanboe Times , 



FOOTE COUNTY. 

( See Ford County.) 

The New West and the Optic, Cimarron 

The Signet, Cimarron 



FORD COUNTY. 

Dodge City Times 

Ford County Globe, Dodge City 

The Globe Live-Stock Journal, Dodge City 

Dodge City Democrat 

Kansas Cowboy, Dodge City ^. ., 

Tne Sup, Dodge City 

Speareville Enterprise 

Speareville News 

Speareville Blade 

Ford County Record, Speareville 

Ford County Democrat, >peareville and Fonda 

The New West, Cimarron 

Cimarron Herald and Kansas Sod House 

The Jacksonian, Cimarron 

The Ryansville Boomer, and The Boomer, Ford City., 
Wilburn Argus 



1876-1881 

1877-1881 

1880-1886 

1882-1886 

1882-1886 

1886 

1886 

1886 



ELLSW^ORTH COUNTY. 

Ellsworth Reporter 1875-1886 

1882 
1883,1884 
1885,1886 
1878,1879 
1880-1886 
1886 
1882-1886 



1883 

1886 
1884-1886 

1886 
1884-1886 

1885 
1883, 1884 
1885,1886 
1885, 1886 



1879-1881 
1880 



1876-1886 
1878-1884 



1884-1886 

1884. 1885 
1886 
1878 

1878-1880 

1885. 1886 
1885,1886 

1886 
1885,1886 
1885,1885 
1885, 1886 
1885, 1886 



56 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS -Contimueu. 



Newtpapert. 



FRAKKLIK OOUMTY. 

WflAtern Home Journal, Ottawa 

Otuwa Journal •• 

The Triumph, Ottawa 

Otuwa Journal and Triumph.................... 

Ottawa Campus, occasional, ( ▼ois. 1 ana z,) 

Otuwa Kepublican (1875 lacking) - 

Otuwa Dally Republican 



Kansas Home News, Ottawa 

Otuwa Gaaette 

Ottawa Leader 

Kansas Free Trader, monthly, OtUwa. 

Jefferiee Western Monthly, Ottawa 

Dally Local News, otUwa 

Williamsburg Review 

Weekly Gazette. Williamsburg 

The Eagle, Williamsburg 

I^ne Advance 

The Commercial Bulletin, Lane 

The Wellsville News 

The Wellsville Transcript 

The Wellsville News 

The Pomona Knterprise 

Richmond Recorder 

Princeton Progress 



Years. 



1865-1868 

1870-1874 

1876 

1877-1886 

1864-1886 

1874-1886 

1879-1886 

1879, 1880 

1879 

1880 

1883 

1884. 1885 
1886 
1879 

1880-1883 

1885. 1886 
1881,1882 

1886 
1882 
1882,1883 
1884-1886 
1885, 1886 
1885. 1886 



GOVE COUNTY. | 

Buffalo Park Kx press ]o»J 

Buffalo Park Pioneer ia^' mr 

The Golden Belt Republican, Grinnell 1 J»°^' J^Sc 

<ap Sheaf, Grainfield ^^'S 

GaMtte, Gove City ! ^^^ 



OBAUAM COUNTY. 

The Western Star, Hill aty 

Hill City Lively Times 

The Hill City Reveille 

Graham County I>ever, Gettysburg 

The Millbrook Times 

<;raham County Republican, Millbrook 

Millbrook Herald 

Millbrook Herald (2d) 

The Graham County Democrat, Millbrook 

Roaooe Tribune 



1879, 1880 
1881 
1884-1886 
1879, 1880 
1879-1886 
1881 
1882, 1883 



1880, 1881 



GRANT COUNTY. I 

Grant County Register, Ulysses j 1885,1886 

OREELKY COUNTY. I 

<>reeley County Gazette, Greeley Center and Horace 

GREENWOOD COUNTY. 

Eureka censorial 

Kureka Herald 

The Graphic, Eureka ; 

The Kureka Republican , 

(ireenwood County Republican, Eureka. 

The Bureka.'^un 

Greenwood County Democrat, Eureka. 

Democratic Messenger, Eureka 

Madison Times 

The Madison News 

The Zenith, and the Madison Times 

Fall River Times ^ 

Fall River Echo 

Sevcry Pioneer 

.Southern Kansas Journal, Severy 

Severy Liberal 

The Sunflower, Reeoe. 



HARPER COUNTY. 

The Anthony Republican 

Anthony Daily Republican 

Harper County Enterprise, Anthony 

The Harper County Democrat, Antnony 

Harper County Times, Harper 

The Sentinel. Harper 

The Dally Sentinel, Harper 

Harper Graphic. 



1876-1879 
1876-1886 
1879-1882 
1879, 1880 
1880-1886 
1879, 1880 
1882-1884 
1884-1886 
1877, 1878 
1879-1886 



1883-1886 
1882 
1884-1886 
1885,1886 
1885, 1886 

1879-1886 
1886 

1885, 1886 
1886 

1878-1885 

1882-1886 
1886 

1883-1886 



FIFTH Biennial Re poet. 



57 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continued. 



Newspapers. 



Years. 



EUARPER COVTHTY— concluded. 

Anthony Journal 1878-1884 

The Danville Courant 1883,1884 

The Danville Express 1885, 1886 | 

The Attica Advocate I 1885,1886 

Freepcrt Leader ; 1885.1886 

Midlothian Sun, Freeport I 1885,1886 

The Freeport Tribune, (changed from Sun,) i 1886 

The Crisfield Courier 1885-1887 

HAMILTON COUNTY. 

The Syracuse Journal i 1885,1886 

Syracuse Sentinel, (removed from Johnson City, Stanton county,) ! 1886 

Border Ruffian, Coolidge 1885,1886 

Surprise Post 1886 

The Signal, Kendall ' 1886 

The Kendall Boomer 1S86 

Hartland Herald 1886 

The Hartland Times 1886 

Johnson City Sentinel (since in Stanton county; 1886 



HARVEY COUNTY. 



Zur Heimath, Halstead, semi-monthly 

The Halstead Independent 

The Halstead Clipper 

Harvey County News, Newton 

The Newton Republican, (changed from Harvey County News,). 

Newton Daily Republican 

Newton Kansan 

The Golden Gate, Newton 

Das Neue Vaterland, Newton 

The Newton Democrat 

The Burrton Telephone 

The Burrton Monitor 

The Jayhawker and Palladium, Sedgwick 

The Pantagraph, Sedgwick 



1875- 
1881- 
1884- 
1876- 
1879- 



•1881 
•1886 
■1886 
1879 ! 
•1886 i 



1876-1886 
1879 



1883- 
1878- 
1881- 
1882- 
1884- 



1882 ! 
1879 
1886 

1881 ! 

1886 I 

1884 ■ 

1886 : 



HODGEMAN COUNTY. 

Agitator, Hodgeman Center | 1879,1880 

Republican, Fordham 1879 

The Buckner Independent, Jetmore 1879-1881 

The Jetmore Reveille 1 1882-1886 

Hodgeman County Scimitar, Jetmore _ 1886 

Ravanna Chieftain 1885, 1886 

The Kansas Sod-House, Ravanna 1886 

The Orwell Times 1885,1886 



.lACKSON COUNTY. 

Helton Express 

Holton Recorder 

The Holton Argus , 

The Holton Signal 

The Bee, Netawaka and Holton, daily and weekly.... 
The Whiting Weekly News 



1872-1875 
1875-1886 
1877 
1878-1886 
1879,1880 
1883-1886 



.TEFFERSON COUNTY. 

The Kansas Educational Journal, Grasshopper Falls. ( See Leavenworth county.) 

The Kansas New Era, Grasshopper Falls 

Valley Falls New Era 

The Valley Falls Liberal and The Kansas Liberal, monthly. Valley Falls and Lawrence. 

Lucifer, the Linht-Bearer, Valley Falls 

Valley Falls Register ■ 

The Oskaloosa Independent , 

Sickle and Sheaf, Oskaloosa 

Oskaloosa Weekly Sickle , , 

The Winchester Argus 

The Kaw Valley Chief, Perry 

The Perry Monitor, and Kaw Valley Chief, 2d, Perry 

The Norton ville News 

Meriden Report ,.-. 

The Osawkie Times 



JEWELL COUNTY. 



Jewell County Diamond, Jewell City , 

Jewell County Republican, Jewell City 

Jewell County Monitor, Jewell Center 

Jewell County Monitor and Diamond, Jewell Center. 
Jewell County Monitor, Jewell Center and Mankato. 



1866,1867 
1873-1886 
1880-1883 



1881-1886 
1870-1886 
1873-1879 
1879-1886 
1879-1886 
1879-1882 
1883, 1884 
1885, 1886 
1885,1886 
1885, 1886 



1876,1877 1 
1879-1886 
1876,1877 I 
1878,1879 I 
1880-1886 : 



58 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continued. 



Newtpapera. 



JBWKLL covvTY— concluded. 

Jewell County Review, Jewell Center and Mankato 

Mankato Review 

The Kansas Jewellite, Mankato. 

White Oak Independent .^ 

Jewell ( ounly Jtnirtial, Omio ^ 

Western Advocate, Omio 

The Oiulo Mail 

Burr Oak Reveille 

Burr Oak Herald 

Burr Oak Rustler 

Salem Chronicle 

Salem Art;us 

The People's Friend, Salem 

Randall Register.... 



Olathe Mirror 

Mirror and News-Letter, Olathe.... 

The Olathe Mirror 

Olathe Mirror-Gazette 

Western Progress, Olathe 

Kansas Siar, Olathe 

Olathe I.«ader 

Olathe (iazette 

Educational Advocate, Olathe 

Johnson County Democrat, Olathe. 

Kansas Patron, Olathe , 

Ihe Olathe Republican 

Kansas Register, Spring Hill 

Weekly Review, Spring Hill 

Spring Hill New Era 



JOHNSON COUNTY. 





^ 


Years. 


i 


1879-1882 




1883-1886 




1882,1883 




1879 




1879,1880 




1882 




1884 




1880-1884 




1883-1886 




1886 




1882 




1883-1886 




1885,1886 


2 


1885, 1886 


2 


1866-1868 


2 


1876-1882 


6 


1882, 1883 




1883-1886 




1876-1880 




1876-1886 


11 


1879-1882 




1879-1883 


3 


1880 


1 


1882-1886 


5 


1882-1886 


5 


1884,1885 


2 


1878 


1 



l.akin Herald. 



KEARNEY COUNTY. 



_. „. KINGMAN COUNTY. 

The Kingman .Mercury 

The Kingman Blade \ 

The KinK'iiian County Citizen, Kingman .".'.*."!!!!.' 

The Kinsman County Republican, Kingman.. 

Citizen- Republican, Kingman 

Southern Kansas Democrat, Kingman "...!"!"*.*. 

The Kinsman Courier .***" 

Kingman leader 

News, Norwich 



_,,,,.,. . KIOWA COtNTY. 

Wellsrord Register 

The Democrat and Watchman. Dowel 1 post office..!.. 
Comanche Chief and The Kiowa Chief, Reeder . 

Greensburg Signal 

Greensburg Rustler 

Mullinville .Mallet .''.'. 



LABETTE COUNTY. 



Panooi Sun 

Paraooa Sun, daily 

PanoQs Eclipse 

Paraona Dally Ecllpwj ";;;;■; 

Dally Outlook, Parsons " 

pally Infant Wonder, Parsons...".'.".'.'.*."" 

Dally Republican, Parsons 

Parsons Palladium 

Clietopa Advance 

Chetopa Herald 

Cbetopa '■' 

?•»««" ' *'"*!"!Z"Z"!;""" 

Labeiie ..crat, Oswego .' 

The Oswetf., Daily Republican .*."*" 

Mound Valley Herald:. 

Mound Valley News " 

The Altamont SentioeL 



1878, 1880 


1 2 


1880 


1 


1879-1884 


4 


1882-1884 


2 


1884 


1 


1883-1886 


3 


1884-1886 


3 


1884-1886 


2 


1886 


1 


1885 


1 


1885-1886 


1 


1886 


1 


1886 


1 


1886 


1 


1886 


' 


1876-1886 


11 


1884-1886 


6 


1876-1886 


11 


1881-1886 


11 


1877,1878 


1 


1878-1880 


3 


1880,1881 


? 


1883-1886 


4 


1881 




1876-1878 


■?. 


1878-1886 


9 


1876-1878 




1885,1886 


1 


1876-1886 


11 


1880-1886 


7 


1881-1886 


5 


1881-1883 


3 


1885, 1886 


1 


1886, 1887 




1886 


1 



Fifth biennial Report. 



59 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Lane C-^unty Gazette, California. 
Lane County Herald, Dighton.... 
The Dighton Journal 



Newspapers. 



LANE COUNTY. 



LEAVENWORTH COUNTY. 

Kansas Herald, Leavenworth 

Kansas Territorial Register, Leavenworth 

Leavenworth Conservative, daily, (January to June, 1867, lacking,) 

Times and Conservative, Leavenworth, daily 

Leavenworth Times, daily, (July to October, 1878, lacking 

Leavenworth Times, weekly 

Leavenworth Daily Commercial 

Kansas Freie Presse, Leavenworth, weekly 

Kansas Freie Presse, Leavenworth, daily 

Leavenworth Appeal 

Leavenworth Appeal and Herald 

Leavenworth Appeal and Tribune 

Public Press, Leavenworth, weekly 

Public Press, Leavenworth, daily, (from July, 1877, to June, 1879, lacking) 

Home Record, Leavenworth, monthly 

Democratic Standard, Leavenworth, weekly 

Kansas Farmer, Leavenworth, monthly 

The Leavenworth Evening Standard 

The Kansas Educational Journal, monthly: Leavenworth, Jan., 1864, to Aug., 1865; 
Grasshopper Falls, Sept., 1865, to Jan., 1866; Topeka, June, 1866, to Aug., 1867; Em- 
poria, Sept., 1867, to April, 1871 ; Emporia and Topeka, May, 1871, to April, 1873 

Orphan's Friend, Leavenworth, monthly 

The Western Homestead, Leavenworth, monthly 

The Workingman's Friend. Leavenworth 

Leavenworth Weekly Chronicle 

The Visitor, Leavenworth 

The Catholic, Leavenworth 

The Kansas Prohibitienist, Leavenworth 

Kansas Commoner, Leavenworth 

The Tonganoxie Mirror .' 

The Tonganoxie News, changed from Linwood Leader 

The Linwood Leader 



LINCOLN COUNTY. 

Lincoln County News, Lincoln Center 

Saline Valley Register, Lincoln Center 

Lincoln Register, Lincoln Center 

Saline Valley Register, Lincoln Center 

Lincoln Banner, Lincoln Center 

Lincoln Republican, Lincoln Center 

The Argus and Beacon, Lincoln Center 

The Beacon of Lincoln County, Lincoln Center 

The Lincoln Beacon, Lincoln Center 



Border Sentinel, Mound City 

Linn County Clarion, Mound City. 

Mound City Progress 

La Cygne Weekly Journal 

The Pleasanton Observer 

The Pleasanton Herald 

ThePrescott Eagle 

The Blue Mound Sun 



LINN COUNTY. 



LYON COUNTY. 

Emporia News 

Emporia Daily News 

Kansas Educational Journal, Emporia, (see Leavenworth county). 

Emporia Ledger 

The Hatchet, monthly, Emporia 

The Educationalist, monthly, Emporia 

Emporia Sun 

The Kansas Greenbacker, and the National Era, Emporia 

The Emporia Journal ,. 

The Kansas Sentinel, Emporia... .~. 

Daily Bulletin, Emporia 

Emporia Daily Republican 

Emporia Democrat s , 

Emporia Daily Globe 

The Hartford Enterprise 

The Hartford Weekly Call 

Americus Weekly Herald , 

The Americus Ledger 

The Neosho Vivifier, Neosho Rapids 




1880-1882 
1885,1896 



1854-1859 I 5 
1855 i 1 

1861-1868 ! 16 

1869, 1870 I 3 

1870-1886 i .33 

1876-1880 

1873-1876 

1876-1886 

1876-1886 I 

1876-1878 i 
1879 

1879,1880 

1877-1883 

1877 1882 

1876-1886 

1880-1882 

1867-1872 

1881-1886 



1864-1873 I 
1878-1886 I 
1878-1882 1 
1881-1883 I 
1883.1884 1 
1882-1884 i 
1885-1886 i 

1883.1884 I 

1884.1885 ! 
1882-1886 I 
1885-1886 ! 
1883-1884 : 



1873 
1876-1879 
1879,1880 
1881-1883 
1884-1886 
1886 
1880 



1881-1884 



1866-1874 
1876-1886 
1884-1886 
1876-1886 
1876-1886 
1882-1886 
1883-1886 
1883-1886 



1878-1886 

1876-1880 
1877,1878 
1879-1880 
1878,1879 
1878-1879 
1880,1881 
1880-1882 

1881 
1881-1886 
1882-1886 

1886 
1879-1880 
1879-1886 
1881, 1882 
1885, 1886 
1885, 1886 



60 



State Histobical society. 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Nmotpapert. 



h'phsrson county. 

The .McPherson Independent 

The McPherson Freeman 

The McPherson Uepublican 

The Comet, McI*herM)n 

Industrial [liberator, McPherson 

The McPherson Independent, McPherson 

The McPherson Press 

The McPherson County Champion, McPherson 

Lindsborg Ix)calist ' , 

Smoky Valley News, Lindsborg 

Kansas Poster, Lindsborg 

The Canton Monitor 

Canton Carrier 

The Windora Record , 




MABION COUNTY. 

Marion Couuty Record, Marion Center 

The .School (ialaxy, Marion Center 

Central Kansas Telo^icraph, Marion Center 

Marion Hanuer, Marion Center 

Marion (irapbic, Marion Center 

Marion County Democrat and Independent, Marion Center. 

The .Marion Register, Marion , 

The Peabody Gazette 

Peabody Reporter 

The Peabody Post 

Marion (irapbic, I'eabody 

f-lorence Herald 

Florence Tribune , 

Hillsboro Phonograph 

The Intelligenf-er, Hillsboro 

Freundschafts-Kreis, Hillsboro 



MARSHALL COUNTY. 

The Marysvllle Enterprise ( volumes 1 and 3) 

The Lantern, Marysvflle 

The .Marshall County News, Marysville 

Kansas Staats-Zeitung, Marysville '. 

Marysville Signal 

Marysville Post, (jfJerman,) 

Marshall County Democrat, Marysville 

The Bugle Call, Marvsvllle 

The Waterville Telegraph, ( 1874 and 1875 lacking,) 

Blue Rapids Times 7....,., 

IfTlng, IMue Valley Gazette !......... 

The Irving citizen 

Frankfort Record 

The National Headlight, Frankfort '.".'.". 

The Frankfort Ree !"*'.'.*.'.*. 

The Beattic Boomerang 

The North Star. Beattie 

The Star, Beattie 

The Visitor. A xtell '.'"".'.". 

Axtell Anchor 



Fowler City (Jraphic 

The Fowler City Advocate 

MeMle County (Jlolw, .Meade Center 

Meade Center Press 

The Press-Democrat, .Meade Center 

Meade Center Telegram 

The Hornet, Spring IaVb 

The Guardian, West Plains 

Meade County Times, Mertllla ! 



XEADB COUNTY. 



The Western Spirit, Paola 

The Miami Republican, Paola... 

Republican-Citizen, Paola 

Miami Talisman, Paola 

Paola Times 

The Border Chief, Louisburg 

Watchman. Louisburg ;... 

Osawatomie Times 

, The Oaawatomie Seotinel 

FoDtaoa News ,. 



MIAMI COUNTY. 



1876-1879 


4 


1878-1880. 


» 


1879-1886 


/ 


1881,1882 


1 


18«2 


1 


1882-1884 


4 


1884, 1885 


1 


1885,1886 


i - 


1879-1883 


f 3 


1881-1886 


: 5 


1882, 1883 


1 


1880 


1 


1885,1886 


1 


1884-1886 


2 


1875-1886 


i 11 


1877 


1 1 


1880 


1 


1880, 1881 


. 2 


1882,1883 


1 1 


1883, 1884 


1 


1885,1886 


1 


1876-1886 


11 


1880 


1 


1882 


1 


1883-1886 


a 


1876-1885 


10 


1884-1886 


2 


1881 


1 


1881, 1882 


1 


1885, 1886 


2 


1866-1868 


2 


1876 


1 


1876-1886 


11 


1879-1881 


2 


1881-1883 


2 


1881-1886 


5 


1883-1886 


4 


1885, 1886 


1 


1870-1886 


15 


1876-1886 


11 


1876-1878 


3 


1880 


1 


1876-1879 


4 


1879-1881 


2 


1881-1886 


6 


1883,1884 


1 


1884, 1885 


1 


1885,1886 


2 


1883, 1884 


1 


1883-1886 


3 


1885, 1886 


1 


1886 


1 


1885, 1886 


1 


1885,1886 , 


I 


1886 ; 


1 


1886 


1 


1885,1886 


1 


1886 


1 


1886 . 


1 


1874-1886 


13 


1876-1886 


11 


1878-1880 


<> 


1881,1882 1 


1 


1882-1886 1 


5 


1879-1881 1 


2 


1881 1 


1 


1880,1881 1 


1 


1885,1886 ; 


<> 


1885,1886 


1 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 



61 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continued. 



Newspapers. 




MITCHELL COUNTY. 

Beloit Gazette, (duplicates from April, 1872, to April 1873; 1873, 1874 and 1875 lacking;)..! 1872-1886 

Belolt Weekly Record ' 1877-1879 

The Beloit Courier ; 1879-1886 

Beloit Weekly Democrat ' 1878-1880 

Western Democrat, Beloit 1^0,1881 

The Western Nationalist, Beloit .„. : 1882, 1883 

The Echo, Cawker City 1876-1878 

The Caw ker City Free Press I 1878-1883 

Cawker City Journal ' 1880-1886 

The Public Record, Cawker City , 1883-1886 

Glen Elder Key 1880 

Glen Elder Herald 1885,1886 

Simpson Siftings 1884-1886 

Scottsville Independent 1886 



MONTtiOMERY COUNTY. 

Independence Courier 

Independence Kansan 

The Star, Independence 

The Star and Kansan, Independence 

The South Kansas Tribune, Independence 

The Workingman's Courier, Independence 

The Living Age, Independence, 

The Evening Reporter, Independence, (lacking from 1883 to February 17, 1886,). 

The Independence News, daily and weekly 

Montgomery Argus, Independence 

Coffey ville Journal 

The Gate City Enterprise, Coffey ville 

Gate City Gazette, Coffey ville...' 

Cherry vale Leader 

Cherry vale Globe 

Cherry vale News 

Cherry Valley Torch, Cherryvale 

Cherry vale Globe-News 

The Globe and Torch, Cherryvale 

Daily Globe and Torch, Cherryvale 

The Weekly Clarion, Cherryvale 

Cherryvale Bulletin 

The Elk City Globe 

The Elk City Star 

The Elk City Democrat 

The Caney Chronicle , 

The Havana Vidette 

Liberty Light , 



1874,1875 ; 
1876-1884 I 
1882-1884 
1885, 1886 
1876-1886 I 
1877-1879 I 
1881 I 
1882-1886 :■ 
1886 I 
1886 I 
1876-1886 

1884.1885 I 
1886 
1877 ! 

1879-1882 : 
1881,1882 ! 
1882-1885 
1882-1884 i 

1885.1886 i 
1885,1886 I 

1885 ! 
1884-1886 
1882-1886 ! 
1884-1886 ! 
1885,1886 i 
1885,1886 
1885,1886 

1886 



MORRIS COUNTY. j 

Morris County Republican, Council Grove i 1876, 

Council Grove Democrat I 1876, 

Republican and Democrat, Council Grove I 1877- 

Council Grove Republican t 1879- 

Morris County Times, Council Grove I 1880, 

The Kansas Cosmos, Council Grove, (January to July, 1885, lacking; October 15, 1886, { 

Cosmos consolidated with Council Grove Republican,) ; 1881- 

The Council Grove Guard ; 1884- 

Morris County Enterprise, Parkerville. I 1878- 



1877 


1 


1877 


9 


1879 


2 


1886 


8 


1881 


2 


1886 


6 


1886 


9 


1884 


7 



MORTON COUNTY, j 

Frisco Pioneer 1886,1887 



NEMAHA COUNTY. 

Seneca Weekly Courier 

Seneca Courier-Democrat 

The Seneca Tribune 

Our Mission, Seneca ".„ 

Nemaha County Republican, Sabetha 

The Sabetha Advance 

Sabetha Weekly Herald 

The Oneida Journal 

The Oneida Chieftain, Democrat, and Dispatch 

The Oneida Monitor , 

The Wetmore Spectator (lacking from August, 1884, to August, 1885,). 

The Centralia Enterprise 

The Centralia Journal 



1875-1884 


10 


1885, 1886 


2 


1879-1886 


8 


1885, 1886 


1 


1876-1886 


11 


1876, 1877 


2 


1884-1886 


3 


1879-1882 


3 


1883, 1884 


1 


1885,1886 


1 


1882-1886 


3 


1883, 1884 


1 


1885, 1886 


2 



62 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



BOUND NEWSi'APEB FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — CONTiyUEU. 



Newspapers. 



NEOSHO COUNTY. 

Neo«ho County Journal, Osage Mission 

The Temperance Banner, Osage Mission 

Neosho Valley Enterprise, Osage Mission 

The Neosho (.ounty Democrat, Osage Mission 

Neosho Coifniy Keconi, Erie 

The Neosho County Republican, Erie 

Chanute Times.. 

The Ihanute Democrat 

The(4)anute Chronicle 

Chanule Blade 

Head Light, Thayer 

TheThaver Herald 

Star of Hope, Urbana 



The Pioneer, Clarinda and Sidney. 

The Advance, Sidney 

Ness City Times 

The Truth, Ness City.. 

The News, Ness City 

The Ness City Graphic 

The Globe, Schoharie 



NESS COUNTY. 



NORTON COUNTY. 

Norton County Advance, Norton 

Norton ("ounty People, Norton 

The Norton Courier 

Norton Champion 

The I.«nora leader 

The Kansas Northwest, Lenora 

The Kansas Monitor, I^nora 

The Common People, Lenora. 

The Norton County Badger, and The Edmond Times, Edmond, 
The Almena Star 



OSAGE COUNTY. 

Osage County Chronicle, Burlingame, (1872 lacking,) 

Osage County Democrat, Burlingame 

Burlingame Herald 

Burlingame Independent, (changed from Carbondale Calendar, January 28 to April 1, 
1886; Carbondale Independent, April 8 to May 13, 1886, then moved to Burlingame,). 

Osage City Kree Press.. ...C f. 

The Kansas Times, Osage City, (moved from Lyndon,) 

The Osage City Republican „ 

Osage C ounty Democrat, Osage City 

Ljrndon Times 

Tne Lyndon Journal .'.".'.'.*.*.".*.'.*!!!y.'.'.!!!!!'.!*...!!!.T!!!!!! 

The Lyndon I^eader !!!!!!!!./.'....'..."...!..."...!!!."!!!!. 

Kansas Plel»elan, Lyndon and .Scranton .". !"""."..'.!!' " ".'". 

The Carbondale Journal !."..!.... .....!.... . 

Carbondale Independent '.'.'.."."!!"'."!".*.'.". '.'.".'/.V.V/.'.!!!!!!!!!! 

Astonisher A Paralvzer Carbondale ."...".'.*.'.*.'.'."'.' **" 

Kansas Workman, .»H;ranton and Quenemo ....r.......V... .' 

Melvero Record 



Osborne County Farmer, Osborne. 

The Truth Teller, Osborne , 

Dally News, Osborne 

Osltorne County News, Osborne.... 

Bull's City PoHi 

Osborne < ouniy Key, Bull's City,. 
The Western Empire, Bull's City.., 

Downs Times 

Downs ( hlef. " 

Port is Patriot 



OSBORNE COUNTY. 



The Western Empire. Alton, (moved from Buli'Vcityij'. 

OTTAWA COUNTY. 

The Solomon Valley .Mirror, Minneapolis 

The Sentinel. Minneapolis. 



Minneapolis Messenger, (successor of'Sentlneik 
Minneapolis Independent '_ 



OtUwa County Index, Minneapolis.... 
The Progressive Current, Minneapolis. 





i^ 


Years. 


1 




1876-1886 


11 


1878-1880 


2 


1880-18S2 


2 


1883-1886 


4 


1876-1886 


11 


1884-1886 


3 


1876-1886 


11 


1879-1882 


3 


1882, 1883 


2 


188:M886 


3 


1876-1886 


11 



1878 



1879-1882 

1882. 1883 
1880-1886 

1883. 1884 
1884-1886 

1886 
1883,1884 



1878 1882 
1880-1883 
188.3-1886 
1884-1886 
1882-1886 

1884. 1885 

1885. 1886 



1886, 1886 



1881-1886 
1881-1884 



1876-1886 
1879-1881 
1882, 1883 
1886, 1887 
1876-1879 
1882-1886 
1882, 1883 
1882 
1879 
1882-1884 
1885, 1886 
1883-1886 
1884-1886 



1876-1886 



1881,1882 
188.3-1885 
1880-1886 
1886 
1881-1886 
1885, 1886 



1874-1886 
1876-1883 
188:^-1886 
1876-1881 
1880-1883 
188.3, 1884 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 



63 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




OTTAWA COUNTY — concluded.. 

Minneapolis Democrat \ 1884-1886 

The Daily Institute, Minneapolis, Nos. 1 to 20 1885 

Kansas Workman, monthly, Minneapolis i 1885, 1886 

Minneapolis Schooljournal 1885, 1886 

The Delphos Herald < 1879,1880 

Delphos Carrier ! 1881-1886 

Bennington Star 1883-1886 

The Bennington Journal j 1885 

PAWNEE COUNTY. 

Larned Press i 1876-1878 

The Pawnee County Herald, Larned 1877,1878 

The Larned En terprise-Chronoscope. 



18:8-1886 



()pli 
Wee 



The Larned Weekly Eagle-Optic ! 1885,1886 

Garfield Letter : 1885,1886 

PHILLIPS COUNTY. i 

TheKirwin Chief 1876-1886 



Kirwin Progress and Kirwin Democrat., 

The Independent, Kirwin 

Kirwin Republican 

Phillips County Herald, Phillipsburg.... 

The Phillipsburg Times 

Logan Enterprise 

Phillips County Freeman, Logan , 

The Logan Republican 

The Ijong Island Argus 



POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY. 

Pottawatomie Gazette, Louisville, (vols. 1,2, 3,4 and duplicate vol. 1,). 

Kansas Reporter, Louisville 

Pottawatomie county Herald, Louisville 

The Louisville Republican (and The Semi-Weekly Republican) 

Weekly Kansas Valley, Wamego 

The Wamego Blade 

The Wamego Tribune 

Kansas Agriculturist, Wamego 

Wamego Democrat 

St. Marys Times 

St. Marys Democrat 

Pottawatomie Chief, St. Marys 

St. Marys Express 

St. Marys Star 

Inkslingers' Advertiser, Westmoreland ". 

The Weekly Period, Westmoreland ■ 

The Westmoreland Recorder 

The Oaaga Journal 

The Onaga Democrat 

Independent and Morning News, Havensville 



PRATT COUNTY, 



The Stafford Citizen 

Pratt County Press, luka 

Pratt County Times, luka 

The Saratoga Sun 

Pratt County Democrat, Saratoga.. 
The CuUison Banner 



RAWLINS COUNTY. 



Atwood Pioneer 

Republican Citizen, Atwood 

Rawlins County Democrat, Atwood. 

The Ludall Settler 

The Celia Enterprise 



RENO COUNTY. 

Hutchinson News .* 

Hutchinson Daily News J. 

Hutchinson Herald 

The Interior, Hutchinson 

The Interior Herald, Hutchinson 

The Sunday Democrat, (The Dollar Democrat, The Democrat, and the Hutchinson Dem- 



ocrat,). 



The Argosy, Nickerson 

The Nickerson Register..,. 
The Arlington Enterprise. 



1877,1878 


<> 


1880-1886 


6 


1883, 1884 


1 


1878-1886 


9 


1884,1885 


1 


1879-1883 


5 


1883-1886 


3 


1886 


1 


1885 


1 


1867-1870 


5 


1870-1887 


17 


1879 


1 


1882-1886 


5 


1869-1871 


9 


1876 


1 


1877-1882 


6 


1879-1886 


8 


1885, 1886 


1 


1876, 1877 


2 


1878 


1 


1878,1879 


2 


1880-1886 


6 


1884-1886 


3 


1878 


1 


1882-1885 




1885,1886 


2 


1878-1885 


8 


1885,1886 


1 


1880-1882 


' 


1877,1878 


1 


1878-1886 


8 


1881-1886 


5 


1885, 1886 


2 


1885,1886 


1 


1886 


1 


1879-1882 


3 


1880-1886 


6 


1885, 1886 


1 


1884-1886 


2 


1885, 1886 


1 


1876-1886 


11 


1886 


1 


1876-1885 


9 


1877-1885 


8 


1885, 1886 


'2 


1883-1886 


4 


1878-1886 


8 


1884-1886 


2 


1885-1886 


1 



64 



STATE UISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continukd. 



Newspapers. 




BRPUBLIC COUNTY. 



The Belleville Republic 

The Belleville Telescope -.. 

The Weekly Record, Belleville. 



Scandia Republic. 

The Republic County Journal, Scandia.. 



Republican-Journal, Scandia.. 

.Scandia Journal 

Republic County Independent. Scandia.. 

Republic County Chief, Scandia 

While Rock Independent 

Republic f ity News 

Conservative Cuban, Cuba 

Republic County Pilot, Cuba , 

The Wayne Register 



RICE COUNTY. 

Rioe County Gaxette, sterling 

SterlinR Cazette 

Weekly Hiilletin, and The Sterling Bulletin 

The Lyons Republican , 

The Dailv Republican, Lyons 

Central Kansas Democrat, (1882 and 1883 lacking,) Lyons., 

Central Kansas Democrat, daily, Lyons 

The Lyons Prohibitionist .' 

The Rural West. Little River 

The<"hase Dispatch 



RILEY COUNTY. 

The Kansas Radical, Manhattan, (duplicate of 1867 and 1868,) 

The Manhattan Independent 

The Manhattan Standard, (triplicate of 1869 and duplicate of 1870,). 

Manhattan Homfstead 

The Nationalist. Manhattan 

The Literary Review, Manhattan 

Manhattan heacon 

The Industrialist, Manhattan, (twelve duplicates,) 

Manhattan Enterprise 

The Kansas Telephone, Manhattan 

The Manhattan Republic 

The IndejH-ndent, Manhattan.. a 

The Mercury, Manhattan .• 

The <;olden Cresset, monthly, Manhattan 

The Journal of .Mycology, monthly, Manhattan 

The lndp|>ondent,'Riley Center ....".. 

Rantlolph Echo 

LeonardviUe Monitor.. 



1876 
1876-1886 
1883-1885 

1877 
1878-1880 

1881 
1882-1886 
1883,1884 
1885,1886 

1879 
1883-1886 
1884-1886 
1885, 1886 
1885, 1886 



1876-1880 
1881-1886 
1877-1880 
1879-1886 

1882 
1879- 1886 

1886 
1885,1886 
1881, 1882 
1884,1885 



I \ 



ROOKS COUNTY. 

The Stockton News and The Western News, (except 1881, see Plainville News,). 

itooks County Record, Stockton ' 

Stockton Democrat .'.*."'.",' 

The Plainville News, (moved from Stockton for one year.).!.^^^^^ 

The I'lainville Press 

Plainville Echo \ 

Plainville Time*. .;..;: 

Webster Eagle 



RUSH COUNTY. 

Rojih CouDtT Proffreas, Rush Center, and LaCrosse Eagle. 

LaCroMe Chieftain 

The Blade, Walnut City 

The Herald, Walnut City .'. 

Walnut City Gacette 



1866-1868 
1866-1868 
1868-1870 
1869-1878 
1870-1886 

1872 
1872-1875 
1875-1886 
1876-1882 
1881-1886 
1882-1886 

1888 
1884-1886 
1884-1885 
1885, 1886 
1879-1882 
1882-1886 
1884-1886 



1876-1886 
1879-1886 



1885,1886 

1884-1886 

1886 



1877,1878 
1882-1886 
1878-1882 
1888-1886 



nl.Rusaell.... 
'ce, Russell , 



RutMllCn 
Ruasell < 
RusmII I 
The Rus- 
RusHell I 
Hunker i! 

Ruoker lim nannf-r 

Bunker Hill Banner (second) 

Tlie Oakley Opinion 



RU8SKLL OOUNTY. 



iimal.. 
<r , 



. 1876- 

1879 
1882, 
1885, 
1880, 
1882, 
1884, 



»T. JOHN COUNTY. 



1878 
-1881 
1883 



1881 
1883 
1885 



Fifth Biennial Bepobt. 



65 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continued. 



Newspapers. 



\ ^ 



Years. 



SALINE COUNTY. 1 

The Salina Herald ! 1876-1886 11 

Saline County Journal, Salina 1876-1886 \ 11 

Farmers' Advocate, Salina 1876-1879 \ 4 

The Weekly Democrat, Salina 1878,1879 I 1 

Svenska Herolden, Salina 1878-1881 .'! 

The Salina Independent 1882-1885 \ 3 

The Salina Republican I 1886 ! 1 

The Rising Sun, Salina i 1885, 1886 j 1 

1880 i 1 

1881-1886 j o 

1886-1887 ' 1 

1886 1 



Brookville Independent. 

Brookville Transcript 

Chico Advertiser, (discontinued,)., 
The Gypsum Banner 



SCOTT COUNTY. 

Western Times, Scott City i 1885,1886 1 

Scott County News, Scott City 1886 i 1 

Scott Countv Herald, Scott City '.... 1886 ! 1 



SEDGWICK COUNTY. 

Wichita Vidette, (August 25, 1870, to March 11, 1871,).. 

Wichita City Eagle, (1873-1876 lacking,) 

Wichita Daily Eagle 

Wichita Weekly Beacon 

The Wichita Daily Beacon 

Wichita Herald 

Stern des Westens, Wichita 

National Monitor, Wichita 

Daily Republican, Wichita 

Wichita Republican 

Wichita Daily Times 

Sedgwick Jayhawker and Palladium, Wichita 

The New Republic, Wichita , 

Wichita Daily Evening Resident 

The Arrow, Wichita , 

Kansas Staats-Anzeiger, Wichita 

Cheney Journal 

Valley Center News 

Clearwater Leader 



1870, 1871 
1872-1886 
1884-1886 
1874-1884 
1884-1886 
1877-1879 
1879 

1879. 1880 

1880. 1881 
1880, 1881 
1881-1884 
1882-1883 
1883-1886 

1886 
1886 
1886 
1884-1886 
1885, 1886 
1886 



The Garden City Paper , 

The Irrigator, Garden City., 



SEQUOY'Air COUNTY. 



SEWARD COUNTY', 

The Prairie Owl, Fargo Springs 

Seward County Democrat, Fargo Springs 

The Fargo Springs News 



SHAWNEE COUNTY. 

Daily Kansas Freeman, Topeka, ( October 24 to November 7,) 

The Kansas Tribune, Topeka 

Topeka Tribune, (two sets,) 

The Topeka Tribune 

Topeka Daily Tribune, (January 12 to March 1,) 

The Congregational Record, Topeka, (see Douglas county.) 

Weekly Kansas State Recor^, Topeka, ( 1863-1867 lacking, and 7 duplicates,) 

Daily Kansas State Record, Topeka, (January to June, 1870, lacking,) 

Daily Kansas State Record, Topeka, (duplicates of above,) 

Fair Daily Record, Topeka, (duplicate volume,) 



The Kansas Farmer, monthly, (Topeka, May, 1863, March and April, 1864; Lawrence, 
January, 1865, to July, 1867; Leavenworth, September, 1867, to December, 1873; 
Topeka, weekly, 1873 to 1884,) 

Kansas Educational Journal, Topeka, ( see Leavenworth county.) 

Topeka Leader, (1866 and 1867, duplicates,)., 



Commonwealth, daily, Topeka, (41 duplicates,) 

The Weekly Commonwealth, Topeka, (6 duplicates,) 

Tanner and Cobbler, Topeka 

Kansas Magazine, monthly, Topeka 

Topeka Daily Blade, (1874 not published, and 1875 backing, 1 duplicate, 

Topeka Weekly Blade 

Kansas State Journal, daily, Topeka 

Kansas Weekly State Journal, Topeka 

Kansas Democrat, Topeka 

American Young Folks, monthly, Topeka 

Times, Topeka, daily 

The Kansas Churchman, monthly, Topeka, ( 1883-1885, Lawrence,) 

Commercial Advertiser, Topeka.. 



1879 1 1 
1882 I 1 



1885,1886 I 1 
1886 1 
1886 1 



1855 I 
1855-1858 I 
1858-1861 
1866, 1867 

1864 

1859-1875 

1868-1871 

1868-1871 

1871 



1863-1886 23 



1S65-1869 
1869-1886 
1874-1886 

1872 
1872-1873 
1873-1879 
1876-1879 
1879-1886 
1879-1886 
1874-1882 
1876-1882 

1876 
1876-1886 

1877 



56 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICA I^, KANSAS -Continued. 



Nevapapwrs. 



SHAWNEE covVT'l— eonduded. 

Educstiooal Calendar, monthly, Topeka 

Colored CltiMn, Topeka 

D«r tourier.Tojjeka 

The Daily (apiial, Topeka........ •,";i:'""L': 

Weekly rapiial aud Farmers' Journal, Topeka 

?;;^;s::':j^i;s;i!r'i5^i^-^tbiyi8y9:i^;;.;d^ 



The ToiK-ka Trll»nne. 

North Topoka Dally .\rgu8, and Times. 



TbeTo|)eka I'osl, daily. 

The Wliim-Whaiu, Topeka, 

The ICducalionisi.Toneka 

The Kansas Telograph, Topeka 

Good Tidings, Topeka ••——•• 

Daily I>emtK;rat and Daily State Press, Topeka 

The ColortHi I'atriot, Topeka t 

The KveniuK Herald, Topeka .....^....... 

The Faithful Witness, semi-monthly, Topeka 

The National Workman, To|)eka 

Haturday Kvcnlnft I^nce. Topeka 

The Kansas Newspaper Union, Topeka 

The ToiH-ka Tribune — • 

The Daily Critic. Topeka VV",;; ; 

New Paths in the Far West, German monthly, Topeka 

Light, Masonic Monthly, Topeka ::•••,;; ;• 

The Kansas Knight and Soldier, semi-monthly, Topeka 

The Spirit of Kansas, Topeka 

Western Baptist, Topeka 

Western .S-hool Journal, monthly, Topeka .• 

The Kansas l^w Journal, Toi>eka 

The Citizen, daily, Topeka 

The Kansas Democrat, daily, Topeka 

Our Messenger, monthly, Topeka ,;,"•—• 

Welcome, Music and Home Journal, monthly, Topeka 

Anti-Monopolist, Topeka 

Topeka Times, North Toi)eka, (March, 1873, to February, 1874, lacking,). 

North Topeka Times 

The Evening Uepublic, North Topeka 

North Topeka .Mail 

Kaosas Valley Times, Rossville 

The Rossville News 

Carpenter's Kansas Lyre, Rossville 

Silver I^ke News f 

The Future, monthly, Richland 



SHERIDAN COUNTY. 



Sheridan County Tribune, Kenneth.... 
Weekly Sentinel. Kenneth and Hoxie. 
Democrat, Kenneth and Hoxie 



SHERMAN COUNTY. 



The New Teoumaeb, Gandy, Leonard and Itasca.. 
VolUire AdTiaer 



SMITH COUNTY. 

Smith ConntT Pioneer, Smith Centre 

The Kansas Free Press. Smith Centre 

Smith County Record, Smith Centre , 

Smith County Weekly Kullelin, Smith Centre 

The Baroo, Smith Centre 

Gaylord Herald 

The Toiler and Independent, Harlan , 

The Harlan Weekly Chief 

The Harlan Advocate ^. 

The Cedarvllle Telephone 

TheCcdarvllIc Review 

The Dispatch, Reamsville 

The Cora Union 



STAFFORD COUNTY. 

g«»H-r.r<i rniintv Herald. Stafford 

St. v Republican, Stafford , 

Ti \dvanoe , 

The - :. Juhn , 

The Siallurd County Bee, Milwaukee. 

The Macksville Times 




1881,1882 
1884-1886 
1885,1886 



1876-1886 
1879-1881 
1882,1883 
1884-1886 
1885,1886 
1879-1886 
1879, 1880 
1884, 188.5 
1885,1886 
1883 
1884, 1885 
1884-1886 



1879-1886 
1886 
1880-1886 
1885,1886 
1882,1883 
1886 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 



67 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS -Continued. 



Newspapers. 



STANTON COUNTY. 

Veteran Sentinel, and Johnson City Sentinel 

STEVENS COUNTY. 

Hugo Herald, Hugoton 

SUMNER COUNTY. 

Sumner County Press, Wellington 

Wellington Daily Press 

Sumner County Democrat, Wellington 

Wellington Semi-Weekly Vidette 

The Wellingtouian, Wellington 

The Wellington Democrat 

Sumner County Standard, Wellington 

The Daily Postal Card, Wellington 

The Republican, Wellington 

The Wellington Monitor , 

Kansas Weather Observer, Wellington 

Oxford Independent 

Oxford Reflex and Weekly 

Caldwell Post 

Caldwell Journal .* 

Oklahoma War Chief, Wichita, January 12 to March 9, 1883; Gueda Springs, March '23 
to July 19, 1883; Oklahoma Territory, April 26 and May 3, 1884; Arkansas City, May 10, 
1884; Geuda Springs, August 30, 1884; South Haven, October 23 to December 4, 1884; 
Arkansas City, February 3 to June ll,J88o; Caldwell, June 18, 1885, to August 12, 1886. 

Caldwell Commercial 

Caldwell Standard 

The Free Press, Caldwell 

Belle Plaine News 

The Kansas Odd P'ellow, Belle Plaine 

The Resident, Belle Plaine 

Mulvane Herald 

Mulvane Record 

Geuda Springs Herald 

Argonia Clipper 

Conway Springs Star 

The Weekly News, South Haven 

The South Haven New Era 

THOMAS COUNTY. 

Thomas County Cat, Colby 

TREGO COUNTY. 

The Wa-Keeney Weekly World 

Kansas Leader, Wakeeney 

Trego County Tribune, Wakeeney 

Globe, Cyrus 

WABAUNSEE COUNTY. 

The Wabaunsee County Herald, Alma 

The Alma Weekly Union 

Wabaunsee County News, Alma 

The Blade, Alma 

Wabaunsee Countj^ Herald, Alma 

The Alma Enterprise 

The Land-Mark, Eskridge, (not published from December, 1874, to June 30, 1883,) 

The Home Weekly, Eskridge 

The Eskridge Star 

Wabaunsee County Democrat, Eskridge 

WALLACE COUNTY. 

Wallace County Register, Wallace 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Western Observer and Washington Republican, (broken files,) 

Washington Republican and Watchman 

Washington Republican 

Washington County Register, Washington -... 

Washington County Daily Register, Washington... r.~. 

Weeekly Post, Washington 

Western Independent, Hanover 

Washington County Sun and Hanover Democrat '.. 

The Hanover Democrat 

Grit, Hanover 

The Clifton Localist 

Clifton Journal and Review 

Clifton Review '. 



1873-1886 

1886,1887 

1877-1879 

1879 

1881-1885 

1882-1884 

1 884-] 886 

1886, 1887 

1886 

1886 

1886 

1876-1879 

1880,1881 

1879-1883 

1883-1886 



1883-1886 
1880-1883 

1884 
1885,1886 
1879-1886 
1882,1883 
1885,1886 
1880-1882 
1885,1886 
1882-1886 
1884-1886 
1885, 1886 
1885, 1886 

1886 



1885, 1886 



1879-1886 
1879, 1880 
1885, 1886 
1882. 1883 



1869-1871 
1871,1872 
1876-1886 
1877,1878 
1879-1881 
1884-1886 
1873-1883 
1881-1886 
1883-1886 
1886 



1886 



1869,1870 
1870,1871 
1876-1886 
1881-1886 
1884,1885 
1883-1886 
1876,1877 

1878 
1878-1886 
1884,1885 

1878 
1878-1880 
1881-1886 



68 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS-Concloded. 



Newspapers. 



WASHINGTON OOUKTT — Concluded . 

Tb« Local News aad The Semi-Weekly News, Clifton 

The Greenle»f Journal 

The Greenleaf Independent 

The iDdewndent-Journal, Ureenleaf. 

Ureenlear Herald 

The Haddam Weekly Clipper ~ 

Palmer Weekly (Jlobe 

The Barnes Enterprise 



WICHITA COUNTY. 

Wichita SUDdard, Bonasa and L«oti City 

lieoil lADoe 



Wilson County (Itizen, Kredonia.. 

Fredonia Tribune 

Fredonta Democrat 

The Times, Fredonia 

Fredonia ("hronicle 

Neodesha Free Press 

Neodesha Gazette,...! 

Neodesha Register 



WILSON COITNTY. 



' >i 



Years. 



1885,1886 
1881-1888 
1882, 1883 
1883-1886 



1885,1886 



1870-1886 
1878, 1879 
1882-1886 
1883-1885 
1885, 1886 
1876-1882 
1881. 1882 
1883-1886 



WOODSON COUNTY. 

Woodson Counlv Post, Neosho Falls 1873-1883 

Neosho Falls P<;st ^f^Mf^^ 

Weekly News, Yates Center, and The Yates Center News 1877-1886 

Yates Center Argus ^??^'^??? 

Woodson Democrat, Yates Center 1884-1886 

The Toronto Topic 1883-1886 



WYANDOTTE COUNTY. 

(iuindaro Cbinduwan , 

Wyandotte Gazette (1869 and 1873 lacking) 

Wyandotte Herald { 1873 lacking) 

The KawHWouth Pilot, Wyandotte 

F^jiiltablc Aid Advocate, monthly, Wyandotte 

Wyandotte Kepulilican, daily and weekly 

The Wyandotte Chief. 

Kansas' Pioneer, Wyandotte 

The Pioneer, Kansas City, Kansas 

The Kansas Pilot, Kansas Citv, Kansas 

The Stock Farm and Hume Weekly, Kansas City, Kansas. 

The Spy, Kansas City, Kansas 

The Globe and the Sun and Globe, Kansas City, Kansas.... 

Light, Kansas City, Kansas 

The Wasp, liosedale 



1857, 1858 
1866-1886 
1872-1886 
1881 
1881-1883 
1881, 1882 
1883,1885 
1883-1885 
1878-1880 

1879. 1881 
1880 

1881. 1882 
1884, 1886 
1884, 1885 
1884, 1885 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, ETC., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES. 




tiewtpopwt. 


Years. 


1 


«..B.«A. 

The NaUonallst, Mobile 


1865-1868 

1879-1886 

1879-1880 

1882-1886 

1885,1886 

1886 

1886 

1886 

1877-1886 
1878-1886 
1879-1880 
1880-1881 
1880-1886 
1882-1886 
1884 


R 


CALIFOBNIA. 

San Francisco Weekly Post 

The Alaska Appeal, San Francisco 


9 
1 


The Pacific Rural Press, San Francisco 

The Overland Monthly, San Francisco 

California Patron and Agriculturist, San Francisco 


5 
2 
1 


American Sentinel, Oakland 




Signs of the Times, Oakland ;:.;:;:;:: 


1 


COLORADO. 

Silver World, LakeCHty 


9 


Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver .'.Z!.'.'.* '."!*.*.*'.'.!' 

The Rocky Mountain Presbyterian, Denver and Cincinnati 

The Gunnison Review, weekly 


9 

9 


vMoantaIn Mall.Salida 


6 


The Gunnison Dally Review-Pr««. !.'..*"'.'.".."!!!.'.""'. ' 

Denver Daily Tribune ....."..!""!........!!.!"".!!!..'..!" 


9 
2 



FIFTH BIENNIAL RE POET. 



69 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, ETC., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES— Continued. 



Newspapers. 



COLORADO — concluded. 

GrandJunction News 1884 

White Pine Cone I 1884-1886 



CONNECTICUT. 

The Connecticut Courant, Hartford 

Middlesex Gazette, Middletown, 1804, 1805 and 1817., 

Quarterly Journal of Inebriety, Hartford 

Travelers' Record, monthly, Hartford 



1796-1799 
1804-1817 
1876-1886 



DAKOTA. 

Dakota Teacher, Huron, August, 1885, to June, 1886 ' 1885,1886 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

Kendall's Expositor, Washington j 1841 

The National Era, Washington 1847-1859 

The Council Fire, Washington 1879-1882 

The Alpha, Washington 1881-1886 

The Washington World 1882-1884 

National Tribune 1883,1884 

United States Government publications, monthly catalogue, Washington 1885,1886 

The Official Gazette of the United States, Patent Office, Washington | 1885,1886 



FLORIDA. 

The Florida Dispatch, Jacksonville \ 1885, 



GEORGIA. 

Southern Industrial Record, monthly, Atlanta j 1885, 



ILLINOIS. 

Religio-Philosophical Journal, Chicago 

The Inter-Ocean, Chicago 

Semi-weekly Inter-Ocean, Chicago 

Faith's Record, monthly, Chicago 

Commercial Advertiser, Chicago , 

Industrial World and Commercial Advertiser, Chicago 

Industrial World and Iron Worker, Chicago 

American Antiquarian, quarterly, Chicago , 

Weekly Drovers' Journal, Chicago 

The Standard^ Chicago 

Farmers' Review, Chicago 

Chicago Journal of Commerce 

The Dial, Chicago 

Brown and Holland's Short-Hand News, monthly, Chicago., 

The Watchman, semi-monthly, Chicago 

The Weekly Magazine, Chicago 

The New Era, Chicago , 

The Odd Fellows' Herald, Bloomington 

The Weekly News, Chicago 

The Western Plowman, Moline.. 

The Grange News, River Forest 

Svenska Araerikanaren, Chicago 

The Unitarian, monthly, Chicago 

The Union Signal, Chicago , 

The Penman's Gazette, monthly, Chicago and New York 



INDIAN TERRITORY. 

The Cherokee Advocate, Tahlequah 

The Cheyenne Transporter, Darlington 

Indian Chieftain, Vinita 



INDIANA. 

Indiana State Journal, Indianapolis 

Our Herald, La Fayette 

The Millstone and The Corn Miller, monthly, Indianapolis.. 
Mennonitische Rundschau, Elkhart 



IOWA. 



Davenport Gazette 

The Weekly Hawk-Eye, Burlington 

The Burlington Hawk-Eye, daily 

The Iowa Historical Record, quarterly, Iowa City. 



Weekly Courier-Journal, Louisville.... 
Southern Bivouac, monthly, Louisville. 



1868-1877 
1874-1881 
1879-1886 
1874-1881 
1877-1879 
1880-1882 
1882-1886 
1878-1886 
1879-1886 
1880-1886 
1880, 1881 
1881 
1881-1886 
1882-1885 
1882-1886 
1882-1885 



1885, 1886 
1885. 1886 



1886 
1886 



1878-1886 
1882, 1883 
1885, 1886 



1878 
1881-1885 
1882-1885 
1885, 1886 



1878-1880 
1886, 18874 



70 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



BOUND NEWSPAPEBS, Ac, OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES -Contikurd. 



Newpapvr: 



LOUISIANA. 

8oath-We8t«rD Christian Advocate, New Orleans.. 
The Times-Democrat, daily, New Orleani 



MARYLAND. 

Johns Hopkins University Circular, Baltimore.. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

October 20. 1794, to Oct. 12, 1795 ••—••" 

Massachusetts .Mertury, lioston. May 11, 1798, to Aug. 9, 1799^..... ••••"•••••;" 

Thffndepcndent ChrJnicle and the Universal Advertizer, Boston, from Jan. 1, 1798, to 

Thfl^eDcWnt Chronicle, Bos^^^^ to Dec. 30, 1804 ^ 

BSstonlSt from April 7, 1809. to Sept. 12. 1810 ; from March 2 to Dec. 25 1811 ; from 
March 14. 1812, to Sept. 8, 1813; and scattering duplicates from March 3, 1809, to 

Inde*^nden^Cbron■icTe and Boston 

Columbian Centiuel and Massachusetts Federalist, Boston from June 29, 1799 to Aug 
31 1805 • irom Jan. 3, 1807, to Oct. 3. 1810; from Jan. 2, 1811, to July 1, 1812; and 
scatterine duplicates from Feb. 28, 1801. to Dec. 29, 1802 ••••••■"•••; 

Bost^ olieue. l?om Jan. 9 to Oct. 29, 1804: from Aur. 19. 1815, to Aug. 19, 1816; from 
Sec 27 1817. to Dec. 25, 1819; from April 23, 1827, to Nov. 28, 1828 

Boston Commercial Gazette, daily, from Dec. 29, 1817, to Dec. 25, 1819 

Massachusetts Spy or Worcester Gazette • •• •''":";'A"I"'i't""' 

TheNatioual /vigis, Worcester. Dec. 2, 1801, to Dec. 25, 1811 ; from Jan. 20, 1813 to May 
4 1814; from jin. 5, 1815, to Dec. 25, 1816; from Dec. 15, 1824, to June 8, 1825; and 
years 1825, 1830, 1838-1840 

Boston Spectator, from Jan. 4. 1814, to Feb. 5, 1815 

NoJth American Review, Boston, (Nos. 3-6. 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 19, 20, 21 and 130 lacking,).., 

Essex Register. Salem, from Jan. 1 to Dec. 17, 1817 

The Missionary Herald, Boston, vols. 17-80 

The Massachusetts Spy, weekly, Worcester .......... 

New England Galaxy, Boston, from Oct. 31, 1823, to Dec. 26, 1828; and scattering dupli- 
cates from Oct. 15, 1824, to April 6, 1827 

Christian Examiner, Boston, vols. 1-19, 1824-1836, and 12 vols, between 1840 and 1867 

Boston Recorder, from Jan. 2. 1832, to Dec. 25, 18;«.. 

The Liberator, Itoston, (lacking 1834-1837 and 1839,) •••••••••••• 

Evening Journal, Boston, from Jan. 3, 1837, to Dec. 30, 1843 ; from Jan. 4 to Dec. 30, 1844; 
and from Feb. 4 to Dec. 30, 1845 

The Commonwealth, daily, Boston, Jan. 1 to July 3, 1851 ; and from Jan. 1 to Sept. 21, 




1854. 



The Commonwealth, Boston, from Sept. 1, 1866, to Aug. 28, 1869 

Youth's Companion, Boston, from Oct. 21, 1852, to April 17, 1856, and 1886, 

Dally Transcript, Worcester, from Feb., 1853. to Dec, 1855 

Evening Telegraph, daily, Boston, from Sept. 27, 1854, to March 31, 1855.... 

Quarterly Journal of American Unitarian Association. Boston 

Monthly Journal of the American Unitarian Association, Boston 

Anglo-Saxon. Boston, from Jan. 5 to Dec. 15, 1866 

The Atlantic Monthly, lioston, vols. 1-60 

The Atlas and Daily llee, Boston, from June 15 to Dec. 31, 1858 



Worcester Daily Spy, from Jan. to Dec, 1869; from Jan., 1868, to Dec, 1884; and from 
July. 188.'i. to .July. 1886 



Worceftter Evening Gazette, from Jan. to Dec, 1866; from Jan., 1867, to July 18, 1881 

and from Jan.. 1882, to Dec, 1885 ^ 

Banner of LiKht. Boston 

Worcester Dally Press, from June, 1873, to Dec, 1876 

Boston Journal of Chemistry 

JBgis and Gazette. Worcester, (part of 1877 lacking,) 

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, quarterly, Boston 

The Woman's Journal 

Harvard University Bulletin, quarterly ^ 

Civil Service Record. Boston 

United Stales Official Postal Guide, monthly, Boston „ 

Science, Cambridge, (see New York,) 

The Citizen, monthly, Boston 

The Evening Traveller, daily, Boston, from Jan. to June, 1886 „ 

The Popular Science News, Boston 

The Unitarian Review and Religious Magazine, Boston 

Political Scienoe Quarterly, Boston 



1879-1886 



1885,1886 



1767,1768 

1794-1796 
1798-1799 

1798-1801 
1801-1804 



1809-1813 
1832-1837 



1799, 1812 

1804-1828 
1817-1819 
1805, 1806 



1801-1825 
1814.1815 
1815-1867 

1817 
1821-1884 

1822 

1823-1828 
1824-1868 
1832-1836 
1833-1865 

1837-1845 

1851-1864 
1866-1869 
1852-1886 
1853-1855 
1851,1855 
1854,1869 
1860-1869 

1856 
1857-1882 

1858 



1868-1885 
1869-1872 
187.3-1876 
1873-1877 
1875 1880 
1876-1886 
1879-1886 
1880-1886 
1881,1882 
1881-1886 
1883-1885 



1885.1886 
1885,1886 



MICHIGAN. 

Adtent Review and S«bbath Herald, Battle Creek. 



Fifth biennial Report. 



71 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, &c., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES— Continued. 



Newspapers. 




MINNESOTA. 

Pioneer-Press, St. Paul and Minneapolis 



The Western Journal, (and Civilian,) monthly, St. Louis 

Organ and Reveille, St. Louis 

St. Joseph Free Democrat 

American Journal of Education, monthly, St. Louis 

Kansas City Times, daily, (1875 lacking,) 

St. Joseph Herald, daily, (1878 and to July, 1879, lacking,) 

St. Joseph Herald 

St. Joseph Gazette 

The Kansas City Review of Science and Industry, monthly 

Weekly Journal of Commerce, Kansas City 

Kansas City Daily Journal , 

Mirror of Progress, Kansas City 

Kansas City Price Current 

Santa F6 Trail, monthly, Kansas City, volume 1, number 1 to 8. 

Camp's Emigrant Guide to Kansas, Kansas City 

Fonetic Teacher, monthly, St. Louis, volume 2 

American Home Magazine, Kansas City , 

Kansas City Live-Stock Indicator 

The Mid-Continent, Kansas City 

Svenska Herolden, Kansas City 

Western Newspaper Union, Kansas City 

The Centropolis, Kansas City 

American Journalist, monthly, St. Louis 

The Kansas City Medical Index 

Kansas City Live-Stock Record and Price Current 

Missouri and Kansas Farmer, Kansas City 

The Kansas City Star 



NEW JERSEY. 

The Journal of American Orthoepy, monthly, Ringos. 

NEW MEXICO. 

Santa F6 New Mexican 

Albuquerque Weekly Journal 

Mining World, Las Vegas 

New Mexican Mining News, Santa F6 

Las Vegas Weekly Optic 

The Santa Fe Weekly Leader 



NEW YORK. 

New York American, New York City 

The Anti-Slavery Record, New York 

The Emancipator, New York, (from February 3, 1837, to February 14, 1839,)... 

The New-Yorker, New York 

The Jeffersonian, Albany 

The Northern Light, Albany , 

Workingman's Advocate, New York 

Scientific American, New York, (lacking from 1861 to 1884,) 

New York Daily Tribune, (lacking from 1870 to 1874, and from 1876 to 1879,).. 

New York Semi-Weekly Tribune, (lacking 1876, 1883, 1884,) 

New York Weekly Tribune 

Propagandist, New York 

The Home Missionary, New York , 

Harper's Monthly Magazine, New York 

Harper's Weekly, New York 

New York Illustrated News 

The Industry of All Nations, New York 

Putnam's Monthly. New York 

Daily Times, New York, (incomplete,) 

The Phonographic Intelligencer, New York 

The Printer, New York 

New York Independent, New York 

The Galaxy, monthly, New York 

American Agriculturist, monthly. New York , 

The Revolution, New York J. 

The Spectator, New York and Chicago 

Scribner's Monthly and the Century Magazine, New York 

Popular Science Monthly, New York 

Fruit Recorder and Cottage Gardener, Palmyra 

The Christian Union, New York 

The Iron Age, New York 

The Library .journal, monthly. New York 

The Magazine of American History, monthly, New York 

Brown's Phonographic Monthly, New York '. 



1878, 1879 



1848-1854 
1851 
I860 
1873-1886 
1873-1886 
1876-1886 
1877-1886 
1877-1886 
1877-1884 
1877-1879 
1879-1886 
1879-1881 
1880,1881 
1880,1881 
1880-1884 
1881 
1881,1882 
1882-1886 
1882-1886 
1882-1884 
1883-1886 
1883-1886 
1883-1885 
1884-1886 
1884-1886 
1886 



1884-1886 



1881-1883 
1881-1886 
1880-1882 
1881-1883 
1883,1884 
1885, 1886 



1827, 1828 
1836 
1837-1839 
1837-1840 
1838, 1839 
1841-1843 
1844, 1845 
1849-1886 
1649-1886 
1871-1885 
1869, 1870 
1850, 1851 
1850 1886 
1851-1854 
1857-1886 
1853 
1853 
1853 
1854,1856 
1857 
1858-1863 
1859-1886 
1866, 1877 
1867-1869 
1868-1870 
1870-1880 
1870-1886 
1872-1885 
1874-1876 
1874-1886 
1876 
1876-1886 
1877-1886 
1878-1883 



72 STATE HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY 

BOUND NEWSPAPERS, Ac , OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES-CONTiyUK^ 
Ifmotpapers. 



NEW tovt.v.— concluded. 
The NaUonal atbten and Ballot Box. from May, 1878. to October, 1881, New York, (see 



Ballot Box, Ohio,) ^ aik-«» 

The Cultivator and Country Gentleman, Albany 

The Dally Register. New York 

America, New York Vw","' Mr-vo^b 

TheShelterlnK Arms, monthly, New York 

The Union, Brooklyn VV"'A •"C'Jtl"' 

The Bee Kec|*ni' P'xchanKe, monthly, Canajoharie... 

The Publishers' Weekly, New York.„ « 

The American Missionary. New York 

The Nation, New York ;... - 

John Swlnton's Paper, New York.... ••••"•••"■••••v "V 
Vppleton's Literary Bulletin, bi-monthly, New York 



Phoneiic PMucatori New York and Cincinnati. 

The Literary News, New York :C\'''\i'''"'<r"'^ 

The Student's Journal, phonograuhlc monthlv, New York 

The Phonographic World, monthly, New York 

New York Weokly Witness 

Jh^'hJlstuS'Adv^irteTfr'L'Ap^ir.isS^ 

The Protestant Episcopal Mission Leaf, monthly, New York 

The National Temperance Advocate, New York 

Science, New York 



OHIO. 

The Ohio Cultivator. Columbus 

Weekly Phonetic Advocate, Cincinnati » 

Phonetic Advocate Supplement, Cincinnati ^ • 

The Masonic Review 

Type of the Times, Cincinnati 

American Phonetic Journal, Cincinnati ^... 

The Crisis, from January :U, 1861, to January 23, 1863, Columbus. .......^......... 

The Ballot Box, from June,1876,to May.l878,Toledo,(8eeNationalCitizen,NewYork,). 

Nachrlchten aus der Heldenwelt, Zanesville 

Cincinnati Weekly Times 

The Phonetic Mucator, Cincinnati 

The Christian Hress, Cincinnati 

The American Journal of Forestry, Cincinnati 

The Christian Standard, Cincinnati • 

Magazine of Western History, monthly, Cleveland 

Farm and Fireside, semi-monthly, Springfield ; 

The American Grange Bulletin, Cincinnati 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



The American Naturalist, Philadelphia.. 
Th« Preai, daily, Philadelphia 



ProgT«iS!philadelphla 

Publlo Ledser, daily, Philadelphia. 

Faith and Works, monthly, Philadelphia 

Naturalist's Leisure Hour, monthly. Philadelphia. 

Historical Register, vols. 1 and 2, Harrisburg 

The Farmers' Friend, Mechanicsburg 



Lire-Stock Journal, Fort Worth.. 
Texas Wool Grower, Fort Worth. 

El Faao Timet, daily 

Taxaa Berlew, monthly, Austin .. 



VKKMONT. 

TlM Womao's Magazine, monthly, Brattleboro 

VIRGINIA. 

The Richmond Standard 

.Southern Workman and Hampton School Record, Hampton. 

WASHINGTON TERRITOBY. 

Whatoom Reveille 



WISCONSIN. 

WiaooDslo Bute Journal, Madison 

Western Farmer and Wisconsin Grange Bulletin, Madison 

ENGLAND. 

I.«ndon Illustrated News 

Diplomatic Review, vols. 1-26, London 

The Fonetic Journal. Bath 

The Labour Standara, London 

Forestry, a magazine for the country, monthly, Edinburg and London. 




187&-1881 
1879, 1880 
1879-1886 
1879-1881 
1879-1886 
1879-1882 
1879-1882 
1879-1886 



1883-4887 

1883-1886 

1884,1886 

1884,1885 

1884-1886 

1885, 1886 

1885,1886 

1886, 1886 

1886. 1886 

1886 

1886 

1886 



1845, 1846 
1860-1853 
1860-1852 
1853-1862 
1854,1866 
1868 
1861-1863 
1876-1878 
1877-1880 
1878-1886 
1878-1883 
1880-1886 
1882, 1883 
1883-1886 
1884-1886 
1884-1886 



1867-1880 
1878-1880 
1878-1885 
1879-1886 
1879-1886 
1880-1886 
1883,1884 
1886 

1882-1886 
1882, 1883 



1886 



1886, 1886 

1880,1881 I 
1886 



1878-1886 
1886 



1842-1879 

1855-1877 

1879 

1882-1884 



Fifth biennial Report. 73 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, &c., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES— Concluded. 



Newspapers. 



Years. 



FRANCE. 

Bulletin de la Societe Protectrice des Animaux, monthly, Paris 

Bulletin de la Societe de Geographic, Paris 

Societe de Geographie compte rendu des Seances de la Commission Centrale, semi- 
monthly, Paris 

Chronique de la Societe des Gens de Lettres, monthly, Paris 

Bulletin Mensuel de la Soci§te des Gens de Lettres, Paris 

Bulletin des Seances de la Societe Nationale d' Agriculture, monthly, Paris 



1878-1882 
1878-1886 

1882-1886 
1879-1886 
1878-1880 
1879-1886 



KANSAS NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS NOW RECEIVED. 

The following is a list of the newspapers and periodicals published in 
Kansas, corrected up to the date of the publication of this report, October 
1, 1887. The regular issues of thes'e, with very few exceptions, are now be- 
ing received by the Kansas State Historical Society. They are the free gift 
of the publishers to the State. They are bound in annual or semi-annual 
volumes, and are preserved in the library of the Society in the State Capitol 
for the free use of the people. They number 852 in all. Of these 72 are- 
dailies, 722 are weeklies, 38 are monthlies, 1 is semi-monthly, 1 is bi-monthly^ 
4 are quarterlies, and 2 are occasional. They come from all of the 106 
counties of Kansas, and record the history of the people of all the com- 
munities and neighborhoods. 

• ALLEN COUNTY. 

The Humboldt Union, Republican; W. T. McElroy, publisher, Humboldt. 

The Humboldt Herald, Democratic; S. A. D. Cox, editor and publisher, Humboldt. 

The lola Register, Republican; Chas. F. Scott, publisher, lola. 

Allen County Courant, Democratic; J. C. Hamm & Bro., publishers and proprietors, 
lola. 

Allen County Democrat, Democratic; J. J. Rambo, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, lola. 

The Moran Herald, Republican; G. D. Ingersoll, editor and proprietor, Moran. 

ANDEESON COUNTY. 

Garnett Weekly Journal, Prohibition; Geo. W. Cooper, editor and proprietor, 
Garnett. 

The Republican-Plaindealer, Republican; Anderson County Republican Company 
and Howard M. Brooke, publishers, Garnett. 

The Garnett Eagle, Republican; W. A. Trigg, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Garnett. 

The Greeley News, Neutral; W. O. Champe, editor, Greeley. 

The Colony Free Press, Republican; J.J. Burke, editor. Colony. 

Westphalia Tiroes, Independent; Adele D. Reed, editor and proprietor, Westphalia. 

Kincaid Kronicle, Democratic; H. D. Routzong, editor, W. C. Routzong, proprie- 
tor, Kincaid. 

ATCHISON COUNTY. 

The Atchison Champion, (daily and weekly,) Republican; John A. Martin, pro 
prietor, Atchison. 

Atchison Patriot, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; Patriot Publishing Company, 
proprietors, Atchison. 



74 STATE IIISTOmCAL SOCIETY. 



Atchison Globe, (daUy and weekly,) Independent; Edgar W. Howe A Co., editors 
and proprietors, Atchison. 

The Musootah Record, Republican; L. H. Miller and - Miller, editors and pro- 
prietors, Mascotah. 

BABBEB COUNTY. 

Medicine Lodge Cresset, Republican; L. M. Axline, editor, publisher and propri- 
etor. Medicine Lodge. 

The Barber County Index, Democratic; E. P. Caruthera and W. G. Musgrove, edi- 
tors and proprietors, Medicine Lodge. 

Medicine Lodge Chief, Union Labor; H. G. Evans and Allen, editors and 

publishers, Medicine Lodge. 

Hazelton Express, Republican; W. E. Burleigh, editor and proprietor, Hazelton. 

Hazelton Tribune, Independent; Wm. Whitworth, editor and publisher, Hazelton. 

The Kiowa Herald, Democratic; David D. Leahy, editor, Kiowa Printing & Pub- 
lishing Company, publishers, Kiowa. 

The Kiowa Journal, Republican; W. C. CEarles and D. A. Woodworth, editors and 
publishers, Kiowa. 

The Union, Neutral; W. A. Campbell, editor, C. H. Douglas, business manager, 
Sun City. 

Kansas Prairie Dog, Democratic; C. L. Haramack, editor, Reuben Lake, proprie- 
tor. Lake City. 

The £tna Clarion, Democratic; W. N. Bradbury, editor and proprietor, ^tna. 

BABTON COUNTY. 

Great Bend Register, Republican; E. L. Chapman, editor and proprietor, Great 
Bend. 

Great Bend Tribune, Republican; C. P. Townsley, editor and proprietor, Great 
Bend. 

Barton County Democrat, Democratic; W. E. Stoke, editor, Great Bend. 

The Daily Graphic, Independent; W. E. Stoke, publisher and proprietor, Great 
Bend. 

Ellinwood Express, Independent; C. A. Voigt, editor and proprietor, Ellin wood. 

Pawnee Rock Leader, Republican; J. D. Welch, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Pawnee Rock. 

The Hoisington Echo, Republican; J. H. Kerr, editor, J. M. White, proprietor, 
Hoisington. 

BOUBBON COUNTY. 

Fort Scott Monitor, (daily and weekly,) Republican; John H. Rice, editor; W.M. 
Rice, associate editor; R. P. Rice, business manager; H. V. Rice, traveling agent, 
Fort Scott. 

Fort Scott Tribune, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; J. B. Chapman, editor. Fort 
Scott. 

Kansas Staats-Zeitung, (German,) Independent; L. Rick, editor and publisher, 
Fort Scott. 

The Bronson PUot, neutral; D. F. Peffley, editor and publisher, Bronson. 

The Fulton Independent, independent; A. W. Felter, editor and proprietor, Fulton. 

The Telephone, Neutral; Chas. 8. Clark, editor and proprietor, Mapleton. 

The Garland Gleaner, Independent; Dr. O. J. Bissell, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor; Mark Scott, business manager and city editor, Garland. 

BBOWN COUNTY. 

Brown County Republican, Republican; D. W. Wilder, publisher, I. N. Jones, mau- 
Hger, Hiawatha. 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 75 

The Kansas Democrat, Democratic; George T. Williams, editor and publisher, 
Hiawatha. 

The Free Press, Republican; E. J. Patch, publisher, Hiawatha. 

Horton Headlight, Republican; Harley W. Brundige and Samuel E. Bear, editors 
and publishers, Horton. 

Horton Gazette, Independent; Charles C. Bartruflf, editor, publisher and propri- 
etor, Horton. 

BUTIiEB COUNTY. 

Augusta Weekly Journal, Republican; W. M. Rees and W. J. Speer, editors and 
publishers, Augusta. 

Walnut Valley Times, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Alvah Shelden, editor, 
Shelden & McGuin, proprietors, John McGuin, business manager. El Dorado. 

El Dorado Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; T. B. Murdock, editor 
and proprietor. El Dorado. 

El Dorado Democrat, Democratic; C. J. Griffith, editor and proprietor, El Dorado. 

Douglass Tribune, Republican; J. M. Satterthwaite, editor and proprietor, Douglass. 

Leon Indicator, Republican; S. G. Pottle, editor and publisher, C. R. Noe, associ- 
ate editor, Leon. 

Towanda Herald, Independent; E. Davis jr., editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Towanda. 

Latham Signal, Republican; Tom C. and M. A. Copeland, editors and publishers, 
Latham. 

The Brainerd Ensign, Republican; R. P. Morrison, editor, publisher and propri- 
etor, Brainerd. 

The Beaumont Business, Neutral; John Richards, editor and proprietor, Beaumont. 

CHASE COUNTY. 

Chase County Courant, Democratic; W. E. Timmons, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Cottonwood Falls. 

Chase County Leader, Republican; William A. Morgan, editor and publisher, Cot- 
tonwood Falls. 

Strong City Independent, Independent; F. M. Jones, editor, Strong City Publish- 
ing Company, publishers, Strong City. 

CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY. 

The Sedan Times- Journal, Republican; Adrian Reynolds, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Sedan. 

The Graphic, Democratic; A. D. Dunn, publisher, Sedan. 

Chautauqua Springs Mail, Neutral; R. K. Blake, editor, Chautauqua Springs. 

The Cedar Vale Star, Republican; A. R. Greene, proprietor, J. A. Constant, editor 
and manager. Cedar Vale. 

OHEBOKEE COUNTY. 

Star-Courier, Democratic; James Wilson, editor and proprietor, Columbus. 

The Columbus Advocate, Republican; A. T. Lea & Son, editors and proprietors, 
Columbus. 

Baxter Springs News, Neutral; M. H. Gardner, editor and publisher, Baxter Springs. 

Baxter Springs Delta, Independent; J. M. Duncan, M. D., editor, L. E. AUbright, 
local editor and general manager, Baxter Springs. 

Short Creek Republican, Republican; L. C. Weldy, editor and proprietor. Galena. 

The Western Friend, (monthly,) Religious; Cyrus W. Harvey, editor, Anson B. 
Harvey, publisher, Quakerville. 

Weir City Tribune, Democratic; A. L, Hayden and John W. Kirk, editors and pub- 
lishers. Weir. 



76 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



CHKTBNNK COUNTY. 

Cheyenne County Rustler, Republican; C. E. Denison, editor and proprietor, Wano. 
Wano Plaindealer, Democratic; L. E. Humphrey, editor and proprietor, Wano. 
Bird City News, Republican; Geo. W. Murray, editor and publisher. Bird City. 
Cheyenne County Democrat, Democratic; WUl C. Hydon, editor. Northwestern 
Publishing Company, publishers. Bird City. 

The Gleaner, Republican; J. W. Benner, editor and publisher, Jaqua. 

CLABK COUNTY. 

Clark County Clipper, Democratic; John I. Lee. editor, Lee Bros., publishers and 
proprietors, Ashland. 

Ashland Herald, Republican; Geo. W. Kimbrel, editor, J. W. and G. W. Kimbrel, 
publishers, Ashland. 

Ashland Weekly Journal, Republican; W. L. Cowden, editor, F. H. Morgan, man- 
ager, Journal Company, publisher, Ashland. 

Clark County Chief, Democratic; G. S. Watts, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Englewood. 

The Minneola Era, Democratic: Allen B. Sayles and Watson, editors and pro- 
prietors, Minneola. 

The Lexington Leader, Independent; Joe H. Carter, editor and proprietor, Lex- 
ington. 

Cash City Cashier, Republican, Jerome Winchell, editor, publisher and proprietor. 
Cash City. 

CLAY COUNTY. 

The Dispatch, (semi-weekly,) Republican; E. J. Bonham and J. B. Palmer, editors, 
J. B. Palmer, manager. Dispatch Publishing Company, publishers. Clay Center. 

The Times, (daily and weekly,) Republican; J. P. Campbell and D. A. Valentine, 
editors and owners. Clay Center. 

The Clay Democrat, Democratic; W. J. A. Montgomery, editor, publisher and 
proprietor. Clay Center. 

The Observer, (monthly,) Religious; Y. M. C. Association, publisher, F. E. Derr, 
general secretary. Clay Center. 

The Outlook, (monthly,) Religious; S. Waite Phelps, editor, Ernest Pye, business 
manager, Clay Center. 

The Clay County Sentinel, Republican; James M. Padgett, editor and publisher, 
Morganville. 

Wakefield Advertiser, Democratic; J. J. L, Jones, editor, Wakefield. 

The Idana Journal, Independent; 8. T. Marshall, publisher, Idana. 

CLOUD COUNTY. 

Concordia Empire, Republican; T. A. Sawhill, editor. Empire Steam Printing 
Company, publishers, Concordia. 

Kansas Blade, (daily and weekly,) Republican; J. M. Hagaman, publisher, Con- 
cordia. 

Kansas Kritic, Union Labor; W. H. Wright <k Son, editors and proprietors, Con- 
cordia. 

The Concordia Times, Republican; T. A. Filson, editor, T. A. & F. M. Filson, 
publishers and proprietors, Concordia. 

The Concordia Weekly Daylight, Democratic; W. N. Dunning, editor and proprie- 
tor, H. A. Moore, associate editor, Concordia. 

The Clyde Herald, Republican; J. B. &, M. L. Rupe, editors and proprietors, Clyde. 

The Clyde Mail, Republican; A. 8. Green, editor, Clyde. 



Fifth Biennial Report. it 

The Christian Visitor, (monthly,) Religious; J. S. Nasmith, editor, Clyde. 

The Kansan, Republican; James and Mary L. Burton, editors, publishers and pro- 
prietors, Jamestown. 

The Glasco Sun, Republican; Ferd Prince, printer, Glasco. 

The Miltonvale News, Republican; J. C. Cline & Sons, editors, publishers and pro- 
prietors, Miltonvale. 

Miltonvale Chieftain, Republican ; C.W. Trobridge, editor and publisher, Miltonvale. 

The Ames Bureau, Neutral; Mrs. C. L. Roadruck and Miss Etta Roadruck. editors 
and proprietors, Ames. 

OOFFEY COUNTY. 

Burlington Republican-Patriot, Republican; C. 0. Smith, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Burlington. 

The Burlington Independent, Democratic; John E, Watrous, publisher, Burling- 
ton. 

The Burlington Nonpareil, Republican; Brown Printing Co., publishers, Burling- 
ton. 

The Free West, (quarterly,) Real Estate; Lane & Kent, publishers, Burlington. 

Le Roy Reporter, Independent; Frank Fockele, publisher and proprietor, Le Roy.. 

The Lebo Light, Neutral; Philo B. Clark, editor and business manager, F. M. 
Burnham, proprietor, Lebo. 

Waverly News, Independent; L. E. Smith, publisher and proprietor, Waverly. 

The Gridley Gazette, Independent; Dan K. Swearingen, publisher, Gridley. 

OOMANCHE COUNTY. 

The Coldwater Review, Democratic; Review Publishing Co., publishers, Coldwater. 

The Western Star, Democratic; W. M. Cash, editor and proprietor, Coldwater. 

Coldwater Echo, Republican; Elbridge G. Phelps, editor and publisher, Coldwater.^ 

The Coldwater Real Estate Journal, (monthly;) G. W. Lanman and H. S. Bennett, 
publishers, Coldwater. 

Nescatunga Enterprise, Republican; N. S. Mounts, editor, N. S. Mounts and T. E. 
Beck, proprietors, Geo. W. Newman, publisher, Nescatunga. 

Comanche City News, Democratic; J. C. MoUoy, editor, MoUoy & Co., publishers,. 
Comanche City. 

Kansas Ledger, Republican; H. M. Winn, editor, publisher and proprietor. Pro- 
tection. 

COWIiEY COUNTY. 

The Winfield Courier, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Ed. P. Greer, editor, Win- 
field. 

Cowley County Telegram, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; D. C. Young & Co.^ 
publishers and proprietors, Winfield. 

Saturday Evening Tribune, Republican; E. B. Buck, proprietor, Winfield. 

The Winfield Visitor, (daily,) Republican; A. L. Shultz and M. L. Harter, editors,, 
publishers and proprietors, Winfield. 

The American Nonconformist, labor; H. & L. Vincent, publishers and proprie- 
tors, Winfield. 

Republican Traveler, (daily and weekly,) Republican; J. O. Campbell, proprietor 
and managing editor, Arkansas City. 

Arkansas Valley Democrat, Democratic; T. Mclntire, editor, C. M. Mclntire, local 
editor and publisher, Arkansas City. 

Evening Dispatch, (daily,) and Canal City Dispatch, (weekly,) Democratic; Amos 
Walton, editor and proprietor, Dispatch Company, publishers, Arkansas City. 

The Burden Enterprise, Republican; A. W. West, editor, publisher and proprietor^ 
Burden. 



78 STATE HlSTOmCAL SOCIETY. 



Burden Eagle, Republican; James H. Caskey, editor and proprietor, Burden. 

The Udall Record, Republican; Albert V. Wilkinson, editor, Samuel B. Sherman, 
Henry F. Hicks and A. V. Wilkinson, proprietors, Udall. 

Advertiser, Atlanta, Republican; P. W. Craig, editor. 

The Eye, Rapublican: Harrison D. Cooper, editor and proprietor, C. G. Elliott, 
local editor. Dexter. 

CBAWFOBD COUNTY. 

The Qirard Press, (semi- weekly,) Republican; E. A. Wasser and Dudley C. Flint, 
editors, publishers and proprietors, Girard. 

The Girard Herald, Democratic; W. F. Laughlin and T. H. Anderson, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Girard. 

The Cherokee Sentinel, Republican; Chas. M. Lucas, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Cherokee. 

The Cherokee Cyclone, Democratic; G. G. Hamilton, editor and proprietor, Cher- 
okee. 

The Pittsburg Smelter, (semi-weekly,) Republican; John P. Morris, editor, Will 
P. Leech, associate editor, Pittsburg. 

The Pittsburg Headlight, (daily and weekly,) Republican; M. F. Sears and C. W. 
Moore, editors and publishers, Pittsburg. 

The McCune Times, Republican; J. M. Thompson, editor, McCune. 

Walnut Journal, Independent; H. Quick and W. H. Holeman, editors and proprie- 
tors, Walnut. 

The Arcadia Reporter, Independent; Dr. O. J. Bissell, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor; M. Scott, local editor, Arcadia. 

The Hepler Banner, Republican; Henry F. Canutt, editor, H. F. Canutt A Son, 
publishers, Hepler. 

DAVIS COUNTY. 

The Junction City Union, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Geo. W. Martin, editor, 
publisher and proprietor, Junction City. 

The Junction City Tribune, Union Labor; John Davis, editor, Chas. S. Davis, 
associate editor and business manager, Junction City. 

The Junction City Republican, Republican; Geo. A. Clark, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Junction City. 

DEOATUB COUNTY. 

Oberlin Herald, Democratic; F. L. Henshaw and A. N. Burch, editors and propri- 
etors, Oberlin. 

Oberlin Opinion, Republican; F. W. Casterline, editor, Casterline Bros., proprie- 
tors, Oberlin. 

The Oberlin Eye, (semi-weekly,) Republican; C. Borin, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Oberlin. 

The Norcatur Register, neutral; H. H. Hoskins, editor and publisher, Nbrcatur. 

The Allison Breeze, neutral; W. E. Smith, editor and proprietor, Allison. 

DICKINSON COUNTY. 

The Abilene Gazette, (daily and weekly,) Republican; George W. C. Rohrer, editor 
and proprietor, Gazette Publishing Company, publishers, Abilene. 

The Abilene Chronicle, Republican; Mrs. Mary M. Bowman, editor and proprie- 
tor, Abilene. 

The Abilene Reflector, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; Henry Litts, editor, L. H. 
Litts <fc Co., publishers and proprietors, Abilene. 

Solomon Sentinel, Republican; E. B. Burnett, editor and publisher, Solomon City. 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 7Q 



The Anti-Monopolist, Anti-Monopoly; W. H. T. Wakefield, editor, Joe Fiedler, 
business manager. Enterprise. 

The Hope Herald, Republican; Geo. Burroughs, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Hope. 

The Hope Dispatch, Democratic; A. M. Crary, editor. Dill & Bell, proprietors, 
Hope. 

The Herington Tribune, Republican; Tom Gallagher, editor and publisher, Her- 
ington. 

The Herington Herald, (quarterly,) Neutral; Tom Gallagher, editor and publisher, 
Herington. 

Carlton Advocate, Republican; Lambert Willstaedt, editor and publisher, Carlton. 

The Chapman Courier, Republican; H. C. Boles, publisher. Chapman. 

The Banner Register, Neutral; S. P. Harrington, editor, S. P. Harrington and J. 
G. Connor, publishers. Banner City. 

DONIPHAN COUNTY. 

The Weekly Kansas Chief, Republican; Sol. Miller, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Troy. 

The Troy Times, Republican; A. W. Beale, editor, publisher and proprietor, Troy. 

DOUGLAS COUNTY. 

Lawrence Tribune, (daily and weekly,) Republican; W. F. Chalfant, editor and 
proprietor, Lawrence. 

Lawrence Journal, (daily and weekly,) Republican; 0. E. Learnard, editor and pro- 
prietor, Lawrence Journal Co., publishers, Lawrence. 

Die Germania, (German,) Gottlieb Oehrle, publisher, Lawrence. 

The Lawrence Gazette, Democratic; Osbun Shannon, editor, Gazette Publishing 
Co., publishers; Frank L.Webster, manager, Lawrence. 

The University Review, (monthly,) educational; T. F. Doran, editor-in-chief, A. L. 
Wilmoth and V. L. Kellogg, business managers; Kansas University Publishing Co., 
publishers, Lawrence. 

The Weekly University Courier, educational; Cyrus Crane, editor-in-chief. Courier 
Co., publishers, Denton Dunn, Prest., R. J. Curdy, Sec, Lawrence. 

Sigma Nu Delta, (bi-monthly,) college society magazine; Grant W. Harrington, edi- 
tor-in-chief, Lawrence. 

The College Review, (Business College monthly,) W. H. Sears, managing editor, 
Lawrence. 

Kansas Zephyr, (monthly,) amateur; Fred H. and Jus. D. Bowersock, editors, 
Lawrence. 

Baldwin Ledger, Republican; W. H. Finch, editor, C. O. Finch, local editor, Bald- 
win. 

Baldwin Index, (monthly,) educational; College Library Societies, publishers, 
Baldwin. 

The Eudora News, Independent; M. R. Cain, editor and proprietor, Eudora. 

EDWABDS COUNTY. 

Kinsley Graphic, Democratic; Lon Beard, editor and publisher, Kinsley. 

The Kinsley Mercury, (daily and weekly,) Republican; W. S. Hebron, editor and 
publisher, Brandon Bros. & Hebron, proprietors, Kinsley. 

Weekly Banner-Graphic, Democratic; Lon Beard, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Kinsley. 



80 STATE HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



ELK COUNTY. 

The Howard Courant. Republican; Asa, Tom E. and John A. Thompson, editors 
and publishers, Howard. 

Howard Democrat, Democratic; James Robert Hall, editor and publisher, Howard. 

The Longton Times, Independent; Geo. M. Flory, editor and publisher, Longton. 

Longton Leader, Neutral; Grierson &, Co., publishers and proprietors, J. Holman 
Buck, local editor, Longton. 

Moline Mercury. Neutral; Geo. C. Armstrong, editor, Armstrong &, Co., publishers^ 
Moline. 

Grenola Chief, Republican; D. W. Jones, editor and proprietor, Grenola. 

Kansas Telephone, Neutral; Grant A. Robbins, editor. Elk Falls. 

ELLIS COUNTY. 

Hays Sentinel, Republican; F. C. Montgomery, manager. Hays City. 
Ellis County Free Press, (semi-weekly,) Republican; Harry Freese, editor, pub- 
lisher and proprietor, Hays City. 

The Ellis Headlight, Republican; M, M. Fuller, editor and proprietor, Ellis. 
The Ellis Review, Neutral; Frank J. Brettle, editor and publisher, Ellis. 
Walker Journal, Neutral; C. L. Cain, publisher and proprietor, Walker. 

ELL8WOBTH COUNTY. 

Ellsworth Reporter, Republican; W. A. Gebhardt and Geo. Huycke, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Ellsworth. 

Ellsworth Democrat, Democratic; G. A. CoUett and F. S. Foster, editors, G. A. 
Collett, proprietor, Ellsworth. 

The Wilson Echo, Republican; 8. A. Coover, editor and proprietor, C. S. Hutchin- 
son, foreman, Wilson. 

The Wilson Hawkeye, Republican; J. A. Tillman and F. E. Jerome, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Wilson. 

The Kanopolis Journal, Republican; R. V. Morgan, publisher and proprietor, 
Kanopolis. 

The Holyrood Enterprise, Neutral; Will J. Shaughnessy, editor, John Corrigan 
and Shaughnessy, proprietors, Holyrood. 

FINNEY COUNTY. 

Finney County Democrat, Democratic; P. J. Talbot and L. H. Barlow, editors, 
publishers and proprietors, Garden City. 

Garden City Sentinel and Cultivator, (daily and weekly,) Republican; L. D. Bailey, 
editor, J. W. Gregory, proprietor. Garden City. 

Garden City Herald, (daily and weekly,) Republican; J. S. Painter, editor, W. W. 
Wallace, business manager. Herald Publishing Company, publishers, Garden City. 

Pierceville Courier, Democratic; Richard Talbot, editor, Lon Whorton, proprie- 
tor, Pierceville. 

The Terry Eye, Neutral; E. L. Stephenson, editor, publisher and proprietor, Terry. 

The Hatfield News, Neutral; M. B. Crawford, editor and proprietor, Hatfield. 

FOBD COUNTY. 

The Dodge City Times, Independent; N. B. Klaine, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor. Dodge City. 

The Globe Live-Stock Journal, Republican; D. M. Frost, editor and publisher. 
Dodge City. 

. Dodge City Weekly Democrat, Democratic; W. F. Petillon, proprietor, Dodge 
City. 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. • 81 



The Champion, Independent; Rev. John Begley, editor, Noel Edwards, manager, 
Begley & Edwards, publishers, Dodge City. 

Ford County Republican, Republican; R. E. Deardoff, editor, M. W. Sutton and 
Rush E. Deardoff, proprietors, Dodge City. 

Speareville Blade, Republican; John R. Huffman, editor and proprietor, Speare- 
ville. 

The Boomer, Democratic; Frank G. Prouty, editor and proprietor. Ford. 

Ford Gazette, Democratic; C. D. Baxter, editor, publisher and proprietor. Ford. 

Ford County Democrat, Democratic; Jas. C.Harrell, editor and proprietor, Fonda. 

The Wilburn Argus, Democratic; J. H. Clawson, editor and proprietor, Wilburn. 

Bucklin Standard, Independent; E. H. Wilson, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Bueklin. 

FBANKLIN COUNTY. 

Ottawa Journal and Triumph, Greenbacker; E. H. Snow, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Ottawa. 

The Ottawa Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; A. T. Sharpe, editor and 
proprietor, Ottawa. 

Ottawa Daily Local News, Neutral; W. L. Kerr, editor and proprietor, Ottawa. 

The Queen City Herald, Democratic; J. B. Kessler, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Ottawa. 

The Kansas Lever, Prohibition; W. M. Preshaw, editor, Ottawa Printing Company, 
publishers, Ottawa. 

Ottawa Campus, (monthly,) collegiate; Frank A. Wright, editor-in-chief, J. W. 
Griffith, business manager, Ottawa. 

Fireside, Factory and Farm, (monthly.) Neutral; E. W, Frick and Frank Muth, 
publishers and proprietors, Ottawa. 

The Eagle, Neutral; T. W. Fields, editor, publisher and proprietor, Williamsburg. 

The Commercial Bulletin, Republican; Frank Pyle, editor, publisher and propri- 
etor, Lane. 

The Wellsville Exchange, real estate; T. J. Gregory, editor and publisher, Wells- 
ville. 

Richmond Recorder, Neutral; T. W. Fields, editor, publisher and proprietor, Rich- 
mond. 

Princeton Progress, Neutral; T. W. Fields, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Princeton. 

GARFIELD COUNTY. 

Ravanna Chieftain, Republican; Alexander & Roby, editors, publishers and pro- 
prietors, Ravanna. 

Ravanna Record, Democratic; Enos <fc Davies, editors and publishers, Ravanna. 

The Kal Vesta Herald, Democratic; John Ewing, editor and manager, J. B. Fu- 
gate, proprietor, Kal Vesta. 

The Essex Sunbeam, Neutral; Will. F. Ellsworth, editor and proprietor, Essex. 

Garfield County Call, Democratic; Naugle & Cline, publishers, Eminence. 

Garfield County Journal, Independent; G. L. Sigman, editor and publisher. Loyal. 

GOVE COUNTY. 

Buffalo Park Pioneer, Republican; G: F. Roberts and F. J. Potter, publishers, 
Buffalo Park. 

The Golden Belt, Independent Republican; H. A. Houston, editor, Jos. Corette, 
proprietor, Grinnell. 

Grainfield Cap Sheaf, Democratic; Grainfield Publishing Company, publishers, 
William J. Evans, editor and manager, Grainfield. 



$2 ' STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Gove County Gazette, Republican; Rezin W. McAdam, editor and proprietor, 
Gove City. 

Gove County Graphic, Democratic; Ralph L. Chriswell, editor and publisher, 
Gove City. 

The Settlers' Guide, Independent Republican; 8. W. Baker, editor, J. H. Baker, 
manager, Quinter. 

The Smoky Globe, Independent; J. L. Papes, editor, Cosby A Reed, proprietors, 
Jerome. 

QBAHAM COUNTY. 

The Millbrook Times, Republican; Ben. B. F. Graves, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Millbrook. 

Millbrook Herald, Democratic; N. C. Terrell, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Millbrook. 

Graham County Democrat, Democratic; L. M., L. F., and Lillie Pritchard, editors, 
publishers and proprietors, Millbrook. 

The Hill City Reveille, Republican; J. G. Binder, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
HUl City. 

The Hill City Democrat, Democratic; J. F. Stewart, publisher and proprietor. Hill 
City. 

The Western Cyclone, Republican; Geo. A. Sanford, editor and proprietor, Nioo- 
demus. 

The Nicodemus Enterprise, Republican; H. K. Lightfoot, editor and publisher, 
J. C. Lowery, assistant editor, Nicodemus. 

The Fremont Star, Independent; W. H. Cotton, editor and proprietor, Fremont. 

GBANT COUNTY. 

Grant County Register, Democratic; Herbert L. Gill, editor and proprietor, 
Ulysses. 

Ulysses Tribune, Republican; Elmer H.Youngman, editor and proprietor, Ulysses. 

Golden Gazette, Independent; T. S. Hurd, editor and publisher, Golden. 

Zionville Sentinel, Neutral; W. C. Calhoun, editor and proprietor, Zionville. 

Cincinnati Commercial, Independent; J. W. Kendall and G. W. Perry, editors and 
publishers. Commercial Publishing Company, proprietors, Cincinnati, Tilden post 



Lawson Leader, Independent; J. V. Cover, editor, Lawson. 

Conductor Punch, Democratic; Sam Cummins, editor. Punch Publishing Com- 
pany, publishers, Conductor. 

OBAY COUNTY. 

The Jaoksonian, Democratic; G, M. Magill and Ellis Garten, publishers and pro- 
prietors, Cimarron. 

Cimarron New West, Republican; S.S.Logan, business manager, Logan & Camp- 
bell, proprietors, Cimarron. 

Gray County Echo, Republican; G. W. Benedict, editor, A. T. Riley, proprietor, 
Cimarron. 

The Montezuma Chief, Democratic; J. H. Hebard, editor and manager, Monte- 
zuma. 

Ingalls Union, Independent; R. H. Turner, editor, Ingalls. 

Ensign Razzoop, Independent; H. A. Post, editor, Ensign, (Lone Lake post oflaoe.) 

OBBBIiEY COUNTY. 

Greeley County Gazette, Democratic; Ben. O. and W. B. C. Wible, publishers, 
Horace. 



Fifth biennial Repobt, S3 



Greeley County Tribune, Democratic; Carter Hutchinson, editor and publisher, 
Tribune. 

Tribune Enterprise, Democratic; Richard J. Colver, editor, Tribune. 

Greeley County News, Democratic; A. J. Hunter, editor and proprietor, Greeley 
Center. 

GEEENWOOD COUNTY. 

The Eureka Herald, Republican; Z. Harlan, editor, publisher and proprietor. Eu- 
reka. 

The Greenwood County Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; W. E. Doud, 
editor and proprietor. Eureka. 

Democratic Messenger, Democratic; T. W. Morgan, editor, Eureka. 

The Madison News, Republican; W. O. & V. E. Lunsford, editors and proprietors, 
Madison. 

The Madison Times, Republican; E. R. Trask, editor and publisher, Madison. 

The Severy Record, Republican; J. M. Littler, editor and proprietor, Severy. 

Fall River Times, Independent; J. A. Somerby, editor, Fall River. 

Fall River Courant, Republican; Geo. H. Doud, editor and proprietor, Fall River. 

Greenwood Review, Independent; G. S. McCartney, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Virgil. 

HAMILTON COUNTY. 

The Syracuse Journal, Republican; H. N. Lester, editor, J. P. Gardner, business 
manager, Syracuse. 

Syracuse Sentinel, Republican; Will C. Higgins and Ed. V. Higgins, managing 
editors and proprietors, Syracuse. 

The Syracuse Globe-Democrat, Democratic; A. C. McQuarrie, editor and pub- 
lisher, Syracuse. 

The Kendall Boomer, Democratic; Henry Block, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
KendaU. 

The Coolidge Citizen, Independent; W.A.Merrill, editor and proprietor, Coolidge. 

HAEPEB COUNTY. 

The Anthony Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; George W. MafEet, 
editor, publisher and proprietor, Anthony. 

Harper County Enterprise, Democratic; T. H. W. McDowell, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, W. L. Hutchinson, general business manager, Anthony. 

The Free Press, (daily and weekly,) Republican; E. R. Callender and T. J. Black- 
man, editors and proprietors, Anthony. 

The Harper Sentinel, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; J. L. Isenberg, editor and 
publisher, Harper. 

Harper Graphic, Republican; C. S. Finch, editor, W. T. Walker, associate editor 
and business manager. Finch <fc Walker, publishers and proprietors, Harper. 

The Attica Advocate, Republican; L. A. Hoffman, editor, Hoffman & Son, publish- 
ers and proprietors, Attica. 

The Attica Bulletin, Democratic; F. B. Brown, editor and publisher, Attica. 

Freeport Leader, Republican; Mervin O. Cissel, publisher, Freeport. 

Bluff City Tribune, Republican; WilL.C. Barnes, editor and publisher. Bluff City. 

HAEVEY COUNTY. 

The Newton Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Noble L. Prentis, editor, 
Newton Publishing Company, publishers, Newton. 

Newton Kansan, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Chas. H. Kurtz, editor and pro- 
prietor, Newton. 



.s4 STATE HiSTOmCAL ISOCIETY. 

Newton Anzeiger, German; U. Hege, editor, Newton. 

The Halstead Independent, Republican: H. S. Gilhams, editor and proprietor, 

Halstead. 

The Halstead Herald, Independent; H. E. Swan, editor and proprietor, Halstead. 

The Burrton Graphic, Republican; M. L. Sherpy. editor and publisher, Burrton. 

The Sedgwick Pantagraph, Republican; Cash M. Taylor, editor, C. M. and 

Taylor, publishers, Sedgwick. 

Walton Independent, Independent; Ira H. Clark, editor and publisher, Walton. 

HASKELL. COUNTY. 

The Ivanhoe Times, Neutral; C. T. Hickman, editor and manager, Ivanhoe. 
Santa F^ Champion, Democratic; J. M. Gore, publisher, Santa F^. 
Haskell County Review, Republican; Lowry G. Gilmore, publisher, Santa F^. 
Santa F^ Trail, Democratic; Jay Shoemaker, editor and proprietor, W. P. Hale, 
foreman, Santa F^. 

HODGEMAN COUNTY. 

The Jetmore Reveille, Republican; Roando C. Orndorff, editor, H. Orndorff, pro- 
prietor, Jetmore. 

The Jetmore Weekly Scimitar, Democratic; Henry W. Scott, editor and proprie- 
tor. Jetmore. 

Jetmore Siftiugs, Republican; W. H. Imus, editor, Imus Bros., proprietors, W. B. 
Barksdale, local editor, Jetmore. 

Jetmore Journal, Democratic; Mrs. Delia F. Gore, editor, J. M. Gore and W. R. 
Brownlee, proprietors. Jetmore. 

Hanston Gazette, Republican; J. L. Brady, editor, W. C. Simons, business man- 
ager. Gazette Company, publishers, Hanston, (Marena post office.) 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

The Holton Weekly Recorder, Republican; M. M. Beck, editor and proprietor, 
Holton. 

The Holton Weekly Signal, Democratic; W. W. Sargent, editor and proprietor, 
Holton. 

Jackson County Federal, (semi-weekly,) Republican; G.D.Baker, editor, A. E. 
Baker, proprietor, Holton. 

The Normal Advocate, (quarterly,) Educational; J. H. Miller, editor and proprie- 
tor, Holton. 

The Whiting Weekly News, Republican; G. C. Weible, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Whiting. 

The Hoyt Times, Independent; James Wakefield, editor and proprietor, Hoyt. 

JEFFBB80N COUNTY. 

The Oskaloosa Independent, Republican; F. H. Roberts, editor and publisher, 
Oskaloosa. 

Valley Falls New Era, Republican; R. E. Van Meter, editor and proprietor. Valley 
Falls. 

The Valley Falls Register, Democratic ; T. W. Gardiner, editor and publisher, 
Valley Falls. 

Lucifer, (The Light-Bearer,) Liberal; Moses Harmon and E. C. Walker, editors, 
M. Harmon and George 8. Harmon, publishers, Valley Falls. 

The Winchester Argus, Republican; Lon W. Robinson, editor and publisher, 
Winchester. 

The Nortonville News, Republican; Robert A. Wright, editor and proprietor, Nor- 
tonville. 



Fifth biennial Report. 85 

Meriden Report, Independent; P. N. Gish «fe Son, editors, publishers and propri- 
etors, Meriden. 

The McLouth Times, Republican; A. B. Mills, editor and publisher, McLouth. 

JEWELL COUNTY. 

Jewell County Monitor, Republican; R. F. Vaughan and J. W. Van Deventer, edi- 
tors and proprietors, Mankato. 

The Jewell County Review, Republican ; S. M. Weed, editor and proprietor, 
Mankato. 

Jewell County Republican, Republican; Benjamin Musser and W. C. Palmer, pub- 
lishers, Jewell City. 

Burr Oak Herald, Republican; H. F. Faidley, editor and proprietor. Burr Oak. 

Burr Oak Republican, Republican; George Hill, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Burr Oak. 

Salem Semi-Weekly Argus, Democratic; G. W. Reed, editor and proprietor, Salem. 

The People's Friend, Neutral; M. L. Lockwood, editor and proprietor, Salem. 

Randall Tribune, Independent; O. L. Reed, editor and proprietor, Randall. 

JOHNSON COUNTY. 

The Olathe Mirror, Republican; H. A. Perkins, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Olathe. 

The Kansas Patron, Grange; Geo. Black, editor, H. C. Livermore, manager, John- 
son Cooperative Association, puljlishers, Olathe. 

The Johnson County Democrat, Democratic; W. C. Paul, editor and owner, Olathe. 

The Kansas Star, E. W. Bowles, editor, published by the pupils of the Deaf and 
Dumb Institution, Olathe. 

The Olathe Baptist Builder, (monthly,) Religious; R. P. Stephenson, editor and 
publisher, Olathe. 

The New Era, Prohibition; J. W. Sowers, editor, Spring Hill. 

KEARNEY COUNTY. 

The Kearney County Advocate, Republican; F. R. French, editor and manager, 
C. 0. Chapman, proprietor, Lakin. 

Lakin Pioneer Democrat, Democratic; Geo. J. Blakely, editor and publisher, 
• Lakin. 

Hartland Herald, Democratic; Jos. Dillon, editor and proprietor, Hartland. 

The Hartland TimSs, Republican; T. J. Hayes, editor and publisher, Hartland. 

Kearney County Coyote, Democratic; Lon Whorton, editor and proprietor, Chan- 
tilly. 

KINGMAN COUNTY. 

The Kingman County Democrat, Democratic; W. A. Eaton, editor and publisher, 
Kingman. 

The Kingman Weekly Courier, (daily and weekly,) Republican; John C. Foley, 
editor and publisher, Kingman. 

Kingman Leader, Republican; Morton Albaugh, editor, Kingman. 

Kingman Weekly News, (daily and weekly,) Independent; M. A. Hull, editor, pub- 
lisher and business manager, Kingman. 

Norwich News, Independent Democratic; Chas. C. Bishop, editor and business 
manager. News Company, publishers, Norwich. 

Ninnescah Herald, Independent Republican; J. Geo. Smith, editor and publisher, 
Ninnescah. 

6 



86 * STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

The Spivey Dispatch, Independent; Harry W. Brown, editor and proprietor, 
Spivey. 

New Mordock Herald, Neutral; Chas. M. Becker, editor and proprietor. New Mur- 
dock. 

The Penalosa News, Independent; J. H. Quinn and W. J. Krebs, editors and pub- 
lishers, Penalosa. 

KIOWA COUNTY. 

The Kiowa County Signal, Republican; Will. E. Bolton, editor, publisher anfl pro- 
prietor, Greensburg. 

Qreensbnrg Rustler, Democraitic; 8. B. Sproule, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Greensburg. 

Greensburg Republican, Republican; William H. Hollis, editor, W. H. Hollis A Co., 
publishers, Greensburg. 

The MuUinville Mallet, Democratic; L. F. Grove, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Mullinville. 

Kiowa County Democrat, Democratic; R. E. Dowell, editor, R. A. Dowell A Son, 
proprietors, Wellsford. 

The Bangor Judge, Independent; O. W. Meacham, editor, Bangor Publishing Co., 
publishers and proprietors, Bangor. 

liABBTTB COUNTY. 

The Parsons Sun, (daily and weekly,) Republican; H. H. Lusk, editor and pro- 
prietor. Parsons. 

The Parsons Eclipse, (daily and weekly,) Independent; J. B. and C. A. Lamb, 
editors and proprietors, Parsons. 

Parsons Palladium, Democratic; Will. W. Frye, editor, Frank W. and Will. W. 
Frye, publishers and proprietors, Parsons. 

The Chetopa Advance, Republican; R. M. Roberts, editor and publisher, Chetopa. 

Chetopa Statesman, Democratic; N. Abbott, editor and publisher, Chetopa. 

The Oswego Independent, Republican; Nelson Case, editor, Mrs. Mary McGill, 
publisher, Oswego. 

Labette County Democrat, Democratic; C. E. Hughey and H. A. Harley, editors 
and publishers, Oswego. 

The Oswego Bee, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Abe Steinberger & Co., editors 
and publishers, Oswego. 

The Mound Valley Herald, Republican; W. F. Thrall, editor and publisher. Mound 
VaUey. 

United Labor, Union Labor; C. Len Albm, editor, G. Campbell, business manager, 
Mound Valley. 

Altamont Sentinel, Independent; Harry Mills, editor. Mills A, Newlon, proprietors, 
Altamont. 

Edna Enterprise, Neutral; I. D. McKeehen, editor and proprietor, Edna. 

LANK COUNTY. 

Lane County Herald, Democratic; J. C. Riley jr., editor and proprietor, Dighton. 
The Dighton Journal, Republican; Ben. L. Green, editor, B. L. Green and B. A. 
Sawyer, proprietors, Dighton. 

The Dighton Republican, Republican; M.H. Curts, editor and proprietor, Dighton. 

LXAYXNWOBTH COUNTY. 

The Leavenworth Times, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Z. A. Smith, editor, 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 87 



Edward N'. Dingley, business manager, Leavenworth Times Publishing Co., pub- 
lishers, Leavenworth. 

The Standard, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; T. A. Hurd, president, Edward 
Carroll, secretary, Frank T. Lynch, treasurer and manager, Leavenworth. 

The Sun, (daily,) Independent; T. W. Houston, editor. Sun Publishing Company, 
publishers, Leavenworth. 

The Kansas Catholic, religious; John O'Flanagan, editor, Leavenworth. 

The Home Record, (monthly,) charitable; Mrs. C. H. Cushing, editor. Home for 
the Friendless, publishers, Leavenworth. 

The Orphan's Friend, (monthly,) charitable; J. B. McCleery, editor, Mrs. DeForest 
Fairchild, associate editor, Mbs. Thomas Carney, business manager, Leavenworth. 

The Tonganoxie Mirror, Republican; William Heynen, editor and publisher, 
Tonganoxie. 

LINCOLN COUNTY. 

The Lincoln Republican, Republican; Tell W. Walton, editor and publisher, Lin- 
coln. 

The Lincoln Beacon, Independent; advocates Woman Suffrage, Prohibition, and 
Anti-Monopoly; W. S. & Anna C. Wait, editors and publishers, Lincoln. 

Lincoln County Democrat, Democratic; Ira S. Troup and Ed. Harris, editors 
publishers and proprietors, Lincoln. 

The Sylvan Grove Sentinel, Neutral; W. H. Pilcher, editor and publisher. Sylvan 
Grove. 

liINN COUNTY. 

Linn County Clarion, Republican; J. C. Trigg, editor and proprietor. Mound City. 

Mound City Semi-Weekly Progress, Independent; J. G. Cash and C. L. Mentzer, 
editors, publishers and proprietors. Mound City. 

LaCygne Weekly Journal, Republican; J. P. Kenea and Ed. C. Lane, editors and 
publishers, LaCygne. 

LaCygne Leader, Democratic; J. E. Chapman, editor and proprietor, LaCygne. 

The Pleasanton Observer, Republican; S. J. Heaton, editor, D. S. Capell, proprie- 
tor, Pleasanton. 

The Pleasanton Herald, Greenback; J. E. & Ed. D. Latimer, editors and proprie- 
tors, Pleasanton. 

The Blue Mound Sun, Republican; G. W. Botkin, editor, G. W. Botkin and W. S. 
Piatt, publishers, Blue Mound. 

The Prescott Eagle, Republican; C. E. Covert, editor and proprietor, Prescott. 

liOGAN COUNTY. 

The Monument Courier, Republican; Joe H. Jordan, editor and proprietor, Monu- 
ment. 

Oakley Opinion, Democratic; Edward Kleist, editor and publisher, Oakley. 

Logan County Times, Republican; H. C. Chapman, editor, Loren H. Chapman, 
publisher, Oakley. 

Winona Messenger, Democratic; A. S. Booton, editor and publisher, Winona. 

Russell Springs Record, Neutral; E. C. Forney, editor and publisher, Russell 
Springs. 

McAUaster Weekly Herald, Independent; Pres. Israel, editor, I. P. Israel, publisher 
and proprietor, McAUaster. 

Logansport Light, Neutral; Frank Davis, editor, W. F. Davis <fc Sons, publishers 
and proprietors, C. A. Davis, general agent, Logansport. 

Augustine Herald; N. Fenstemaker, editor, Augustine. 



88 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



liYON COUNTY. 

The Emporia News, (daily and weekly,) Independent; H. A. Newcoinb, editor, 
Chas. Harris, manager, Emporia News Company, publishers, Emporia. 

The Emporia Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; C. V. Eskridge, editor 
and publisher, Emporia. 

The Emporia Democrat, Democratic; J. M. MoCown, editor and proprietor, Em- 
poria. 

The Hartford Weekly Call, Republican; W. J. Means and A. D. Chambers, editors 
and publishers, Hartford. 

The Americus Ledger, Republican; Geo. A. and Wm. Moore, editors and pub- 
lishers, Americus. 

The Admire City Free Press, Republican; James Cox, editor and proprietor, Ad- 
mire City. 

The Allen Tidings, Independent; Major A. Paul, editor and proprietor, Allen. 

m'phebson county. 

The McPherson Freeman, (daily and weekly,) Republican; H. B. Kelly, editor, 
publisher and proprietor, McPherson. 

The McPherson Republican and Weekly Press, (daily and weekly,) Republican; 
8. G. Mead, editor, publisher and proprietor, McPherson. 

Kansas State Register, Prohibition; T. W. and A. D. Woodrow, editors, Kansas State 
Register Publishing Company, publishers and proprietors, McPherson. 

The Democrat, Democratic; Warren Knaus, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
McPherson. 

McPherson Anzeiger, (German;) Western German Publishing Co., publishers, 
McPherson. 

The Lindsborg News, Republican; J. A. Uddeh, editor, Bethany Publishing Co., 
publishers, Lindsborg. 

Framat, (Swedish,) Educational; C. A. Swensson, C. G. Norman, and E. Nelander, 
editors, David A. Swanson, manager, Lindsborg. 

The Canton Carrier, Independent; Geo. C. Findley, editor and publisher. Canton. 

The Canton Republican, Republican; W. R. Davis, editor and publisher. Canton. 

The Windom Enterprise, Republican; C. A. Sensor, editor and proprietor, Win- 
dom. 

The Moundridge Leader, Independent; James M. Coutts, editor and proprietor, 
E. A. Hubbert, publisher, Moundridge. 

The Marquette Monitor, Republican; J. W. Richardson, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Marquette. 

MABION COUNTY. 

Marion Record, Republican; E. W. Hoch, editor, Hoch Bros., proprietors, W. F. 
Hoch, manager, Marion. 

The Marion Register, (daily and weekly,) Republican; C. N. Whitaker, managing 
editor, Harry E. Whitaker, city editor, Whitaker Bros., publishers, Marion. 

The Cottonwood Valley Times, Republican; W. W. Wheeland and M. O. Billings, 
editors, publishers and proprietors, Marion. 

The Marion County Anzeiger, German; J. Harms, editor, Western German Pub- 
lishing Company, publishers, Marion. 

The Peabody Gazette, (daily and weekly,) Republican; W. H. Morgan «fe Son, 
editors, publishers and proprietors, Peabody. 

The Peabody Graphic, Democratic; F. E. Simpson, editor, Peabody. 

The Florence Herald, Republican; W. H. Booth, editor and proprietor, Florence. 



FIFTH BIENNIAL REPOBT. 8^ 

Florence Weekly Bulletin, Democratic; J. B. Crouch, editor, W.V.Kent, publisher, 
Florence. 

Hillsboro Herald, (German,) Democratic; W. J. Harding, editor, Hillsboro Pub- 
lishing Company, publishers, Hillsboro. 

Canada Arcade, Neutral; J. T. Groat and E. S. Shuman, editors and publishers, 
Canada. 

Lincolnville Star; F. D. Weller, editor, Lincolnville. 

Lost Springs Journal, Republican; Bert Dunlap, proprietor, Lost Springs. 

MABSHAIiL COUNTY. 

Marshall County News, Republican; Geo. T. Smith, editor and proprietor, Marys- 
ville. 

Marshall County Democrat, Democratic; William Becker, publisher, Mary sville. 

Marysville Post, (German,) Democratic; William Becker, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Marysville. 

The True Republican, Lab.or Union; P. D. Hartman, editor, Marysville. 

The Waterville Telegraph, Republican; Henry C. Willson, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Waterville. 

Blue Rapids Times, Republican; E. M. Brice, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Blue Rapids. 

The Frankfort Bee, Republican; Lum C. McCarn, editor and proprietor, Frank- 
fort. 

The Frankfort Sentinel, Independent; S.H.Peters, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Frankfort. 

The Axtell Anchor, Independent Republican; J. M. Ross and Thos. Nye, publishers, 
Axtell. 

The Star, Republican; Dan M. Mabie, editor, Star Publishing Company, pub- 
lishers, Beattie. 

Western Breeder, (monthly,) Dan M. Mabie, editor. Star Publishing Company, 
publishers, Beattie. 

The Irving Leader, Republican; J. R. Leonard, editor and proprietor, Irving. 

MEADE COUNTY. 

Meade County Globe, Republican; Frank Fuhr, editor, publisher and proprietor 
Meade Center. 

Meade County Press-Democrat, Democratic; Wilts Brown, editor and publisher, 
Meade Center. 

The Meade Republican, Republican; T. J. Palmer, editor and proprietor, Meade 
Center. 

Fowler City Graphic, Independent; E. E. Henley, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Fowler City. 

The West Plains Democrat, Democratic; S. L. Frisbie, editor and proprietor, West 
Plains. 

Meade County Times, Republican; H. L. Bishop, editor and publisher, Mertilla. 

Spring Lake Hornet, Prohibition; C. K. Sourbeer, editor, Sourbeer Bros., pub- 
lishers. Spring Lake. 

MIAMt COUNTY. 

The Western Spirit, Democratic; B.J.Sheridan, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Paola. 

The Miami Republican, Republican; W. D. Greason, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Paola. 

The Paola Times, Republican; J. T. Trickett, editor and publisher, Paola. 



90 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



The Louisburg Herald, Democratic; B. A. Wright, editor and publisher, Louis- 
bnrg. 

Oaawatomie Gaslight, Independent; C. 8. Bixby, editor, Osawatomie Printing 
Oompany, publishers, Osawatomie. 

The Fontana News, Neutral; A. Lane, editor and publisher, Fontana. 

MITCHELIi COUNTY. 

The Beloit Gazette, Republican; 8. H. Dodge, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Beloit 

Beloit Weekly Courier, Republican; W. H. Caldwell, editor and proprietor, Beloit. 

The Western Democrat, Democratic; M. J. Moore, editor and manager, H. A. 
Yonge, publisher and proprietor, Beloit. 

Cawker City Journal, Republican; Austin L.Topliff, editor and proprietor, Oawker 
City. 

Public Record, Independent Republican; L. L. Alrich, editor and publisher, Cawker 
City. 

Glen Elder Herald, Republican; N. F. Hewett, editor, Arthur L. Hewett, local editor. 
Glen Elder. 

Scottsville Independent, Republican; John S. Parks, editor and publisher, Scotts- 
Tille. 

MONTOOMEBY COUNTY. 

The star and Kansan, Democratic; H. W. Young, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Independence. 

South Kansas Tribune, Republican; W. T. &, C. Yoe, editors, publishers and pro- 
prietors, Independence. 

The Evening Reporter, (daily,) Neutral; T. N. Sickels, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor. Independence. 

The Coflfeyville Journal, Republican; D. Stewart Elliott, editor and publisher, 
Ooflfeyville. 

The Sun, Republican; W. A. Peflfer jr. and John Truby, editors and publishers, 
Coffeyville. 

The Globe and Torch, Republican; C. P. Buffington, editor and publisher, Cherry - 
Tale. 

Cherry vale Bulletin, Democratic; E. W. Lyon & Co., publishers. Cherry vale. 

The Cherry vale Republican, Republican; A. L. Wilson, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, J. I. Wilson, associate editor, Cherryvale. 

Cherry vale Champion, Republican; F. G, Moore, publisher, Cherryvale. 

The Elk City Globe, Republican; V. E. Jennings, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Elk City. 

The Elk City Eagle, Democratic; J.R.Charlton, editor and publisher, Elk City. 

The Caney Chronicle, Republican; J. T. McKee, editor and proprietor, Caney. 

The Liberty Review, Republican; A. S. Duley, editor and publisher. Liberty. 

Havana Weekly Herald, Independent; E. J, Barron, publisher and proprietor, 
Havana. 

The Havana Vidette, R. B. Knock, editor and publisher, Havana. 

MOBBIS COUNTY. 

The Council Grove Republican, Republican; Frank Moriarty and W. F. Waller, 
proprietors, Council Grove. 

Council Grove Guard, Democratic; E. J. Dill and W. D. Jacobs, editors and pro- 
prietors. Council Grove. 



Fifth BIENNIAL Repobt. 91 

The White City News, Independent; Banna Cress, editor and publisher, White 
City. 

The Dwight Wasp, Republican; Frank S. Grasty, editor and manager, Dwight 
Printing Company, publishers, Dwight. 

Field and Range, (monthly,) Agricultural; published by the Field and Range Com- 
pany, proprietors, Dwight, and Kansas City, Mo. 

MOETON COUNTY. 

Morton County Democrat, Democratic; Ed. G. Lee, editor and publisher, Frisco. 
The Southwest Leader, Democratic; Q. A. Robertson, editor, R. G. Price, local edi- 
tor, Leader Company, proprietors, Richfield. 

The Richfield Republican, Republican; Wardrip &, Dauron, publishers, Richfield. 

NEMAHA COUNTY. 

Seneca Courier-Democrat, Democratic; A. P. & C. H. Herrold, editors, publishers 
and proprietors, Seneca. 

The Seneca Tribune, Republicai;! ; W. H. and G. F. Jordan, editors and publishers, 
Seneca. 

Nemaha County Republican, Republican; J. F. Clough, editor and proprietor, W. 
H. Whelan, associate editor, Sabetha. 

The Sabetha Herald, Republican; Flora P. Hogbin, editor, A. C. Hogbin, publisher, 
Sabetha. 

Nemaha County Spectator, Independent; T. J. Wolfley and J. M. Cober, editors 
and proprietors, Wetmore. 

Centralia Journal, Republican; W. J. Granger, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Centralia. 

The Goffs News, Neutral; Thomas A. Kerr, editor and publisher, Goffs. 

NEOSHO COUNTY. 

Neosho County Journal, Republican; R. D. Kirkpatrick, editor and publisher, 
Osage Mission. 

Chanute Times, Republican; Cyrus T. Nixon, editor and publisher, Chanute. 

Chanute Blade, Neutral; C. E. Allison, editor and publisher, Chanute. 

Republican-Record, Republican; B. J. Smith and D. C. Ambrose, publishers, Erie. 

The Neosho County Democrat, Democratic; W. E. Hardy, president and editor, 
Democratic Printing Company, publishers, Erie. 

Head Light, Republican; C. T. Ewing, publisher, Thayer. 

Galesburg Enterprise, Republican; J. R. Schoonover, publisher, Galesburg. 

NESS COUNTY. 

Ness City Times, Republican; Geo. L. Burton and Philo C. Black, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Ness City. 

Ness County News, Republican; J. K. Barnd and R. J. McFarland, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Ness City. 

Walnut Valley Sentinel, Democratic; D. E. McDowell and R. G. Weisell, editors, 
publishers and proprietors, Ness City. 

The Harold Record, Republican; Robt. Findlay, editor and proprietor, Harold. 

Nonchalanta Herald, Neutral; H. C. Notson, editor and publisher, Nonchalanta. 

The Bazine Register, Republican; Morris & Son, editors and proprietors, Bazine. 

NOBTON COUNTY. 

The Norton Courier, Republican; F. M. Duvall, manager, Norton. 

The Champion, Republican; J. W. Conway, editor and proprietor, Norton. 

Norton Democrat, (semi-weekly,) Democratic; W. H. Hiles, editor, W. H. Hiles 



92 STATE HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY, 

and A. L. Drnmmond, publishers and proprietors, A. L. Drnmmond, manager, 
Norton. 

Lenora Leader, Republican; J. H. Wright, editor and publisher, Lenora. 

The Lenora Record, Democratic; Charles T. Bogert, editor and publisher, Lenora. 

The Edmond Times, Republican; Mark J. Kelley, editor. Times Printing Com- 
pany, publishers, Edmond. 

Almena Star, Independent; Q. W. Shook, editor, publisher and proprietor, Almena. 

OSAQE COUNTY. 

The Osage County Chronicle, Republican; J. N. McDonald, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Burlingame. 

The Burlingame Independent, Prohibition; John E. Rastall, editor and proprie- 
tor, Burlingame. 

The Burlingame News, (Amateur Monthly,); Dick Taylor, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Burlingame. 

Osage City Free Press, (semi-weekly,) Republican; J. V. Admire, editor, Free 
Press Printing Company, publishers, Osage Citj. 

Kansas People, (daily and weekly,) Independent; Kansas People Printing Com- 
pany, publishers, Miles W. Blain, president and manager, Elijah Mills, secretary and 
treasurer, Osage City. 

The Lyndon Journal, Republican; W. A. Madaris, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Lyndon. 

The Carbondalian, Republican; Reuben F. Playford, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Carbondale. 

The Kansas Workman, Labor Reform; Cyrus Corning, editor and business man- 
ager, H. P. Vrooman, A. J. R. Smith, and J. A. Smith, associate editors, Kansas Work- 
man Publishing Company, publishers, Quenemo. 

The Osage County Republican, Republican; R. A. Miller, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Quenemo. 

The Melvem Record, Republican; W. S. Rilea, editor and publisher, Melvern. 

OSBOBNE COUNTY. 

Osborne County Farm'er, Republican; S. E. Ruede, C. W. Crampton and C. W. 
Landis, editors, publishers and proprietors, C. W. Crampton, business manager, Os- 
borne. 

Osborne County News, Democratic; W. D. Gerard & Co., editors and publishers, 
Osborne. 

The Western Odd Fellow (monthly), Social; D. J. Riohey, editor and publisher, 
Osborne. 

Osborne County Journal, Republican; F. H. Barnhart, editor and proprietor, Os- 
borne. 

Downs Times, Republican; Geo. E.Dougherty, editor, publisher and proprietor. 
Downs. 

The Downs Chief, Republican; W. H. Whitmore, editor and publisher, Downs. 

Western Empire, Republican; A. G. Grubb, publisher, Alton. 

Portis Patriot, Republican; Franz S. Drummond, editor and publisher, Portis. 

OTTAWA COUNTY. 

The Minneapolis Messenger, Republican; A. P. Riddle and C. M. Dunn, editors, 
publishers and proprietors, Minneapolis. 

Solomon VaUey Democrat, Democratic; Park S. Warren, managing editor, Min- 
neapolis. 



Fifth Biennial Refobt. 9a 

Kansas Workman (monthly), A. 0. U. W.; A. P. Riddle, editor and proprietor^ 
Minneapolis. 

The Sprig of Myrtle (monthly), Knights of Pythias; A. P. Riddle, editor and pro- 
prietor, Minneapolis. 

Ottawa County Commercial, Independent; W. M. & H. R. Campbell, editors and 
proprietors, Minneapolis. 

Delphos Carrier, Republican; W. B. & C. M. Davis, editors and proprietors, Del- 
phos. 

Bennington Star, Independent; D. B. Loudon, editor and proprietor, Bennington. 

The Tescott Herald, Republican; Guy A. Adams, editor, Herald Company, pub- 
lishers, Tescott. 

The Church Gleaner (monthly). Religious; Rev. O.E.Hart, editor and proprietor,^ 
Minneapolis. 

PAWNEE COUNTY. 

Larned Weekly Chronosoope (daily and weekly,) Republican; The Larned Print- 
ing Company, publishers, W. B. Robey, business manager, E. E. Stevens, managing 
editor, Larned. 

The Larned Eagle-Optic, Democratic; Optic Steam Printing Cpmpany, publishers,^ 
Thomas E. Leftwich, managing editor, A. B. Leftwich, business manager, Larned. 

The Burdett Bugle, Democratic; J. C. Browne, manager. Optic Steam Printing 
Company, publishers, Burdett. 

The Garfield News, Independent; F. N. Newhouse, editor and publisher, Garfield. 

PHILLIPS COUNTY. 

The Kirwin Chief, Republican; C. Borin, proprietor, R. I. Palmer, editor and 
manager, Kirwin. 

The Independent, Anti-Monopoly; C. J. Lamb, editor, publisher and proprietor^ 
Kirwin. 

Phillipsburg Herald, Republican; E. F. Korns and R. A. Dague, publishers and 
proprietors, Phillipsburg. 

Phillipsburg Democrat, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; W. D. Covington, William 
Taylor and Frank Boyd, proprietors, Phillipsburg. 

The Phillipsburg Dispatch, Republican; Ira A. Kelley, editor, McNay & Kelley,. 
publishers, J. M. McNay, business manager, Phillipsburg. 

Phillips County Freeman, Anti-Monopoly; H. N. Boyd, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Logan. 

The Logan Republican, Republican; Porter & Lincoln, editors, Logan Printing 
Company, publishers, Logan. 

Long Island Leader, Republican; J. N. Curl, editor, publisher and proprietor^ 
Long Island. 

Phillips County Inter-Ocean, Republican; E. M. Weed, editor and proprietor^ 
Long Island. 

Woodruff Republican, Republican; J. H. Hill, editor, publisher and proprietor,. 
W^oodruflf. 

Marvin Monitor, Republican; Marvin Publishing Company, publishers, G. E. Cronk^ 
secretary, Marvin. 

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY. 

The Louisville Indicator, Republican; E. D. Anderson, editor and publisher, Louis- 
ville. 

Kansas Agriculturist; Neutral; Ernest A. Weller, editor and proprietor, Wamego. 
Daily Wamegan, Independent; Ernest A. Weller, editor and proprietor, Wamego^ 
St. Marys Express, Republican; H. H. Hagan, editor and proprietor, St. Marys. 



94 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

St. Marys Star, Democratic; James Graham, editor and publisher, St. Marys. 

The Westmoreland Recorder, Republican; J. W. Shiner and W. S. Anderson, 
editors and publishers, Westmoreland. 

The Onaga Democrat, Democratic; A. W. Chabin, editor and publisher, Onaga. 

The Oldsburg News-Letter, Republican; J. W. McDonald and Lewis Havermale, 
«ditor8 and publishers, Oldsburg. 

PBATT COUNTY. 

The luka Traveler, Republican; W. V. McConn, editor and publisher, luka. 

Pratt County Press, Republican; A.S.Thomson, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Pratt Center. 

Pratt County Times, Republican; Jas. Kelly and J. W. Naron, editors and pub- 
lishers, Pratt Center. 

Pratt County Register, Democratic; Dilday A Van Senden, editors and publishers, 
Pratt Center. 

The Saratoga Sun, Republican; J. K. Hupp, editor and publisher, Albaugh «k 
Hupp, proprietors, Saratoga. 

Cullison Banner, Independent; Clarence V. Kinney, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Callison. 

The Preston Herald, Republican; J. K. Cochran, editor, Preston. 

BAWIilNB COUNTY. 

The Republican Citizen, Republican; James D. Greason, editor and publisher, 
Atwood. 

The Rawlins County Democrat, Democratic; L. A. Hannigan, editor, Atwood. 

The Ludell Settler, Republican; D. H. McPeek, editor, A. H. Chessmore and D. H. 
McPeek, publishers and proprietors, Ludell. 

The Ludell Gazette, Republican; R. H. Chase, editor, Ludell. 

The Celia Enterprise, Democratic; Fred H. Eno, editor and proprietor, Celia. 

BENO COUNTY. 

The Hutchinson News, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Ralph M. Easley, presi- 
dent and general manager, Hutchinson. 

Interior Herald, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Fletcher Meridith, editor and 
proprietor, Hutchinson. 

The Weekly Democrat, Democratic; B. M. Johnston, editor and proprietor, Hutch- 
inson. 

The Saturday Review, Independent; C. G. Easley, editor and proprietor. South 
Hutchinson. 

The Nickerson Argosy, Republican; W. F. Hendry, editor, R.R.Hendry and J. E. 
Humphrey, publishers, Nickerson. 

The Nickerson Register, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Richard Dallam, pub- 
lisher, Nickerson. 

The Arlington Enterprise, Republican; Ed. M. Wright, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Arlington. 

Sylvia Telephone, Republican; Chas. A. Peyton, editor and proprietor, Sylvia. 

Haven Independent, Independent; Fred W. Thorp, editor and proprietor, Haven. 

The Tnron Rustler, Republican; J. O. Graham, editor, J. O. Graham and Abram 
M. Carr, publishers, Turon. 

Lerado Weekly Ledger, Republican; Leslie Niblack, editor and manager, Frank 
A. A Leslie Niblack, publishers and proprietors, Lerado. 

The Weekly Press, Independent; WiUis J. Pegg, editor and proprietor. Partridge. 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 95 



BEPUBLIO COUNTY. 

The Belleville Telescope, Republican; E. B. Towle, editor, J. C. Humphrey, pub- 
lisher and proprietor, Belleville. 

The Belleville Democrat, Democratic; J. & C. M. McLaury, publishers, Belleville. 

The Scandia Journal, Republican; Geo. F. Page, editor and proprietor, Scandia. 

The Scandia Independent, Independent; S. G. Burnham, editor, J. P. Heaton, 
manager, O. E. Beecher, president, Geo. Nichols, treasurer, T. M. Little, secretary, 
Scandia Printing and Publishing Company, publishers, Scandia. 

Republic City News, Republican; Gomer T. Davies, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor. Republic City. 

The Cuba Pilot, Republican; J. D. Bennett and H. G. McDonald, editors and pro- 
prietors, John D. Bennett, publisher, C. L. McAfee, compositor, Cuba. 

Wayne Register, Republican; B. W. Curtis, editor, publisher and proprietor, Wayne. 

Advanced Leader, Republican; P. McHutchon, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Warwick. 

BICE COUNTY. 

Sterling Gazette, Republican; E. B. Cowgill, editor and publisher, A. L. McMillan, 
associate editor. Sterling. 

The Sterling Bulletin, (daily aud weekly,) Republican; W. M. Lamb, M. D., T. L. 
Powers and Clarence Prescott, publishers. Sterling. 

The Lyons Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Clark Conkling, pub- 
lisher, Lyons. 

Central Kansas Democrat, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; F. N. Cooper <fe Co., 
editors and proprietors, Lyons. 

The Lyons Prohibitionist, Prohibition; D. P. Hodgdon, editor, Lyons. 

The Chase Record, Independent; J. E. Junkin, editor and proprietor. Chase. 

The Little River Monitor, Neutral; T. G. Robison, editor. Little River. 

Geneseo Herald, Neutral; Frank Reeves, editor, F. J. Mealey, associate editor, 
Frank Reeves & Co., proprietors, Geneseo. 

The Raymond Independent, Independent; R. M. W^atson, editor and publisher, 
Raymond. 

Cain City Razzooper, Democratic; Will J. McHugh, editor and proprietor, B. Grant 
Jefferis, associate editor, Cain City. 

BILEY COUNTY. 

The Nationalist, Republican; Rev. R. D. Parker, Geo. F. Thompson and L. B. 
Parker, editors and proprietors, Manhattan. 

The Industrialist, Educational and Agricultural; edited by the Faculty of the State 
Agricultural College, Geo. T. Fairchild, president, Manhattan. 

The Manhattan Republic, (daily and weekly.) Republican; G. A. Atwood, editor, 
Manhattan. 

The Mercury, Democratic; J. J. Davis, editor and proprietor, Manhattan, 

The Kansas Telephone, (monthly,) Religious; Rev. R. D. Parker, editor, L. B. 
Parker, publisher, Manhattan. 

The Journal of Mycology, (monthly,) Scientific; Prof. W. A. Kellerman, Manhat- 
tan; J. B. Ellis, Newfield, N. J.; and B. M. Everhaft, West Chester, Pa., editors, Man- 
hattan. 

The Randolph Echo, Republican; P. B. Lewis, editor, Randolph. 

Leonardville Monitor, Republican; P. S. Loofbourrow, editor, Leonardville. 

BOOKS COUNTY. 

The Western News, Republican; B. Hill, publisher and proprietor, Stockton. 



96 STATE HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY. 



The Rooks County Record, Republican; W. L. Chambers, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Stockton. 

The Rooks County Democrat, Democratic; H. T. Miller, editor and publisher, 
Stockton. 

The Plainville Times, Independent; S. 8. & F. M. Case, editors, and F. M. Case, 
proprietor, Plainville. 

Webster Eagle, Republican; R. D. Graham and Mart H. Hoyt, editors, Webster. 

Woodston Register, Independent; M. L. Mclntyre, publisher, Woodston. 

BUSH COUfTTY. 

Walnut City Gazette, Republican; R. A. &, H. A. Russell, editors, publishers and 
proprietors, Rush Center. 

La Crosse Chieftain, Republican; H. S. Fish, editor, publisher and proprietor, La 
Crosse. 

The La Crosse Democrat, Democratic; J. M. Tracy, editor, La Crosse Printing and 
Publishing Company, publishers, La Crosse. 

Walnut City Democrat, Democratic; R. F. Ward, editor, Democratic Publishing 
Company, publishers. Walnut City, ( Rush Center post ofl&ce.) 

The Walnut City Daily News, Neutral; J. B. MuUay, editor, T. J. Stumbaugh. gen- 
eral manager, Stumbaugh <fe Mullay, publishers. Walnut City. 

The McCracken Enterprise, Neutral; The Enterprise Publishing Company, pub- 
lishers, McCracken. 

BUSSELL COUNTY. 

The Russell Record, Republican; Harry A. Dawson, editor and publisher, Russell. 

Russell Journal, Neutral; E. L. S. Bouton, editor, J. L. C. Wilson, business manager, 
Bouton &. Wilson, proprietors, Russell. 

The Russell Democratic Review, Democratic; A. C. Cruce, editor, Charles Smith 
db Co., proprietors, W. H. Quarterman, manager, Russell. 

The Bunker Hill News, Republican; Chas. F. Pugh, editor, Bunker Hill. 

The Dorrance Nugget, Independent; Samuel H. Haffa, editor and proprietor, Dor- 
rance. 

Luray Headlight, Independent; Jas. £. Garner, editor and manager. Garner Bros., 
publishers, Luray. 

BAIilME COUNTY. 

Saline County Journal, (daily and weekly,) Republican; M.D. Sampson, editor, 
publisher and proprietor, Salina. 

Salina Herald, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; 3. M. Davis, editor and publisher, 
Salina. 

The Salina Republican, Republican; Fred G. Andrews and Ed. B. Payne, editors, 
publishers and proprietors, Salina. 

The Rising Sun, Prohibition; D. M. Gillespie, editor and publisher, Mrs. M. J. 
Hunter, corresponding editor, Salina. 

Normal Register, (occasional,) L. O. Thoroman, editor, Salina. 

The Brookville Transcript, Republican; Frank Honeywell, editor, W. S. Bush, fore- 
man. Transcript Publishing Company, publishers, Brookville. 

Brookville Times, Independent; J. C. Gault, publisher, Brookville. 

The Gypsum Valley Echo, Republican; J. Wayne Amos, editor and publisher. Gyp- 
sum City. 

Assaria Argus, Neutral; Dursley Sargent and J. O. Middaugh, publishers, Assaria. 

SCOTT COUNTY. 

Scott County Herald, Democratic; S. W. Case, editor, Frank A. Capps, local edi- 
tor and business manager, Mrs. S. W. Case, corresponding editor, Scott City. 



Fifth biennial Repobt. 97 

Scott County News, Republican; Harvey Fleming and N. D. Adams, editors and 
publishers, Scott City. 

The Scott Sentinel, Democratic; M. J. Keys, editor, E. B. Harrington, local editor, 
Scott City. 

Pence City Times; J. W. Bast, editor. Pence City. 

SEDGWICK COUNTY. 

Wichita Eagle, (daily and weekly,) Republican; M. M. Murdock, editor, M. M. & 
R. P. Murdock, publishers and proprietors, Wichita. 

The Wichita Beacon, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; Ben A.Eaton, editor, W. B. 
Hotchkiss, business manager, Beacon Publishing Company, publishers, Wichita. 

New Republic, Republican; J. S. Jennings, editor and proprietor, Wichita. 

The Arrow, Neutral; Lon Hoding, publisher, Wichita. 

Wichita Herold, (German,) Democratic; John Hoenscheidt, editor, Wichita. 

Kansas Staats-Anzeiger, (German,) Democratic; John Hoenscheidt, editor, Wichita. 

The Union Labor Press, Anti-Monopolist; E. H. Loutrel, editor, Labor Union 
Publishing Co., publishers, Wichita. 

Sunday Growler, Neutral; R. E. Ryan, editor, Ridge Comly, business manager. 
Growler Publishing Co., publishers, Wichita. 

Evening Call, (daily,) Independent; W. M. Starr and A. M. Bryson, editors, Wichita. 

The Daily Journal, Independent; Leo L. Redding, editor, The Daily Journal Com- 
pany, publishers, Wichita. 

Wichita Globe, Republican; D. L. Roberson, editor, Globe Publishing Company, 
publishers, Wichita. 

Wichita District Advocate, (monthly,) Religious; J. D. Bodkin, editor and business 
manager, Wichita. 

Monthly Echoes, Y. M. C. A.; A. Baird, general secretary, Wichita. 

University Review, (quarterly,) Educational; Rev. Warren B. Hendrix, president 
and business manager, Wichita. 

Th-: Western Evangelist, (semi-monthly,) Religious; Joel Harper and J. H. Parker, 
editors, Wichita. 

The Wichita Democrat, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; Chas. A. Edwards, editor, 
■John Edmonds, manager, O. C. Sharp, business manager. Democratic Publishing 
Company, publishers, Wichita. 

The Valley Center News, Republican; A. H. Carpenter, editor and proprietor, E. 
E. Hodge, assistant editor. Valley Center. 

The Weekly Mt. Hope Mentor, Republican; Welch & Welch, publishers, Mt. Hope. 

The Colwich Courier, Independent; Willis B. Powell, editor and proprietor, Col- 
wich. 

Clearwater Independent, Independent; J. R. McQuown, editor and proprietor, 
Clearwater. 

SBWABD COUNTY. 

The Prairie Owl, Republican; A. B. Carr, editor and publisher, Fargo Springs. 

The Seward County Democrat, Democratic; Griff B. Newcom, local editor and 
foreman, Democrat Publishing Co., proprietors and publishers, Fargo Springs. 

The Fargo Springs News, Republican; A. K. Stoufer, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Fargo Springs. 

Seward County Courant, Republican; R. E. Hicks, editor and proprietor, Spring- 
field. 

Springfield Transcript, Neutral; L. P. Kemper, editor, M. S. Parsons, local editor, 
Springfield. 



98 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



The Springfield Soap-Box, Republican; Gibson <fc Davis, editors, publishers and 
proprietors, Springfield. 

Seward Independent, Independent; L. R. H. Durham, publisher, Seward. 

8HAWNEK COUNTY. 

The Commonwealth, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Commonwealth Publishing 
Company, publishers and proprietors, P. P. Baker, president and editor, N. R. Baker, 
secretary, treasurer arid business manager, Topeka. 

The Topeka Daily Capital, and The Weekly Capital and Farmers' Journal, Repub- 
lican; J. K. Hudson, editor, publisher and proprietor, Topeka. 

Kansas State Journal, ( daily and weekly,) Republican ; Frank P. MacLennan, 
editor and publisher, Topeka. 

The Kansas Democrat, (daily,) Democratic; W. P. Tomlinson, editor and general 
manager, Charles K. HoUiday, city editor, Topeka. 

Kansas Farmer, Agricultural ; Kansas Farmer Company, publishers, Samuel J. 
Crawford, president, J. B. McAfee, general agent, H. A. Heath, business manager, 
W. A. PeflFer, managing editor, Topeka. 

Kansas Telegraph, (German,) Democratic; H. VonLangen, editor and publisher, 
Topeka. 

The Kansas Churchman, (occasional,) Religious; Rt. Rev. Bishop Vail, editor, 
Topeka. 

Kansas Methodist-Chautauqua, Religious; S. E. Pendleton, D. D., editor, P. T. 
khodes, business manager, Topeka. 

The Western Baptist, Religious; L. H. Holt, C. S. Sheffield and A. C. Vail, editors, 
publishers and proprietors, Topeka. 

Saturday Evening Lance, literary; Harry W. Frost, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

The Lantern, literary; James L. King, managing editor, George W. Reed, business 
manager, Topeka. 

The Kansas Newspaper Union; N. R. Baker, manager, Topeka. 

Labor Chieftain, Knights of Labor; C. A. Henrie, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Western School Journal, (monthly,) educational; R. W. Turner, editor and pub- 
lisher,* Topeka. 

The Kansas Knight and Soldier, G. A. R. ; M. O. Frost, editor and publisher, 
Topeka. 

City and Farm Record, (monthly,) real estate; I. W. Pack, editor and proprietor, 
Topeka. 

The Kansas Home, (monthly,) real estate; George W. Watson, editor and pub- 
lisher, Topeka. 

Light, (monthly,) Masonic; Charles Spalding, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Our Messenger, (monthly,) W. C. T. U.; Olive P. Bray, editor, Topeka. 

The Welcome, (monthly,) musical; E. B. Guild, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Bulletin of the Washburn College Laboratory of Natural History, occasional; 
F. W. Cragin, editor, published by Washburn College, Topeka. 

The Washburn Argo, (monthly,) Literary; Howard D. Tucker, editor-in-chief, 
Samuel W. Naylor, business manager, Topeka. 

The Washburn Reporter, collegiate; E. D. McKeever, editor-in-chief, Robert Stone, 
C. P. Donnell, D. H. Piatt and Ralph IngaUs, editors, C. P. Donnell, manager, 
Topeka. 

The Western Advocate, (monthly;) C. RoUin Camp, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

The Bee, amateur, (monthly;) Charles F. Goodrich, editor, Charles Worrall, pub- 
lisher, Topeka. 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. d9 



The Weekly Mail, Republican; Frank A., Albert C. and George A. Root, editors 
and publishers, North Topeka. 

The Spirit of Kansas, Prohibition and Anti-Monopoly; G. F. Kimball, editor and 
publisher. North Topeka. 

The Benevolent Banner, colored; Barker, Garrett, De Frantz &, Charles, editors 
and proprietors. North Topeka. 

Carpenter's Kansas Lyre, Republican; J. S. Carpenter, editor, Rossville. 

8HEBIDAN COUNTY. 

The Hoxie Sentinel, Republican; W. L. Humes, editor and proprietor, Hoxie. 
The Hoxie Democrat, Democratic; S. P. Davidson, editor and proprietor, Hoxie. 
Sheridan Times, Neutral; F. C. Thompson, publisher, Sheridan. 

SHERMAN COUNTY. 

Sherman County Democrat, Democratic; Frank Parks, editor and proprietor^ 
Eustis. 

Sherman County Dark Horse, Republican; J. H. Tait, editor, proprietor and pub- 
lisher, Eustis. 

Sherman Center News, Democratic; E. F. Tennant, editor, John D. Reed, propri- 
etor, Sherman Center. 

Sherman County Republican, Republican; Bayard Taylor, editor, Hedrick & Co.^ 
publishers, Sherman Center. 

Sherman County News, Republican; O. B. Kail, publisher and proprietor, Voltaire. 

SMITH COUNTY. 

Kansas Pioneer, Republican; W. H. Nelson, editor. Nelson <fe Beacon, proprietors, 
Smith Centre. 

Smith County Bulletin, Republican; John Q. Royce, editor and publisher. Smith 
Centre. 

The Bazoo, Democratic; Jack W. Stewart, editor and proprietor. Smith Centre. 

Gaylord Herald, Republican; Lew C. Headley, editor and proprietor, Gaylord. 

Cedarville Globe, Republican; A. Barron, editor and proprietor, Cedarville. 

The Lebanon Criterion, Republican; Byron J. Thompson, editor, Thompson & 
Wright, publishers, Lebanon. 

STAFFOBD COUNTY. 

The Weekly Telegram, Republican; R. M. Blair, editor and proprietor, Stafford. 

Stafford County Republican, Republican-Prohibition; E. S. Hadlock, editor and 
proprietor, Stafford. 

Stafford County Democrat, Democratic; G. R. Cruzen, editor and publisher, Staf- 
ford. 

St. John Advance, Democratic; W. K. P. Dow, editor and proprietor, St. John. 

The Sun, Republican; J. F. Spickard, editor and publisher, St. John. 

County Capital, Republican; I. S. Lewis, publisher, St. John. 

The Macksville Times, Republican; A. H. Dever, editor, Welch & Becktell, pro- 
prietors, John S. Welch, business manager, Macksville. 

The Cassoday Mirage, Republican; W. A. Potter, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Cassoday. 

STANTON COUNTY. 

The Johnson City World, Democratic; Geo. V. Mechler, editor, Mechler Bros., pro- 
prietors, Johnson City. 

Stanton County Eclipse, Republican; Frank Weston, business manager. Eclipse 
Company, publishers, Johnson City. 



100 STATE HiSTOmCAL SOCIETY 



The Mitchellville Courier, Democratic; Frank E. Newkirk, editor, Courier Pub- 
lishing Company, proprietors, Mitchellville. 

The Gazette, Democratic; J. W. Merifield, editor and proprietor, Eli, (Wayland 
post oflSce.) 

The Border Rover, Neutral; Lon Cravens, editor and publisher, Borders. 

STEVBNS COUNTY. 

The Hugo Weekly Herald, Democratic; C. E. Cook, editor and proprietor, N. 
Campbell, local editor, Hugoton. 

Woodsdale Democrat, Democratic; Grant Turner, editor, Grant Turner and E. C. 
McLane, proprietors, Woodsdale. 

Hugoton Hermes, Republican; Chas. M. Davis, publisher, Hugoton. 

Gazelle, Democratic; James Moodey, editor, Zella. 

Dermot Enterprise, Democratic; Gooden & Chism, editors and publishereT, Dermot. 

SUMNBB COUNTY. 

The Sumner County Press, Republican; A. L. Runyan, editor. Press Printing Com- 
pany, publishers, Wellington. 

Sumner County Standard, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; Luke Herring, editor 
and publisher, Frank Gilmore, associate editor, Wellington. 

The Wellington Monitor, Republican; J. G. Campbell and Chas. Hood, editors and 
publishers, Wellington. 

Wellington Morning Quid-Nunc, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Wells Corey, 
editor, Frank Corey, superintendent, F. R. Sprague, secretary, Wellington. 

Weather Observer, (monthly,) John H. Wolfe, publisher, Wellington. 

The Oxford Register, Neutral; J. S. Converse, editor and publisher, Oxford. 

The Caldwell Journal, (daily and weekly,) Republican; W. E. Powers, editor, R. 
B. Swarthout, business manager and publisher, Caldwell. 

The Caldwell News, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Robert T. Simons, editor and 
publisher, Caldwell. 

The Industrial Age, Union Labor; Samuel Crocker, business and managing editor, 
"The Industrial Age" Printing and Publishing Company, publishers, Caldwell. 

Belle Plaine News, Republican; Geo. W. Cain, publisher and proprietor. Belle 
Plaine. 

Mulvane Record, Independent; G. L. Reed, editor, publisher and proprietor, Mul- 
rane. 

Geuda Springs Herald, Republican; C. G. Furry, editor and proprietor, Geuda 
Springs. 

The Argonia Clipper, Independent; Bowker & Duncan, editors and publishers, 
Argonia. 

Conway Springs Star, Neutral; A. M. Anderson, editor and proprietor, Conway 
Springs. 

The South Haven New Era, Neutral; Geo. W. Half erty, editor and proprietor. South 
Haven. 

THOMAS COUNTY. 

Thomas County Cat, Republican; Jos. E. Gill, editor, Thomas County Cat Pub- 
lishing Company, proprietors, Colby. 

The Democrat, Democratic; C. R. Marks, editor and proprietor, Colby. 

TBEQO COUNTY. 

Western Kansas World, Republican; W. S. Tilton, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Wa-Keeney. 



Fifth Biennial Repobt. 101 

Wa-Keeney Tribune, Democratic; A. W. Hotchkiss, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Wa-Keeney. 

Trego County Republican, Republican; Geo. J. Shepard and John N. Barrett, ed- 
itors and proprietors, Wa-Keeney. 

WABAUNSEE COUNTY. 

Wabaunsee County News, Republican; D. W. Scott, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Alma. 

The Alma Enterprise, Republican; V. C. Welch and Frank I. Sage, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors. Alma. 

The Eskridge Home Weekly, Republican; D. V. Dowd, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Eskridge. 

The Eskridge Star, Republican; E. H. Perry and I. Day Gardiner, editors and 
publishers, Eskridge. 

The Alta Vista Register, Republican; S. A. Stauflfer, editor. Register Co., publish 
ers, Alta Vista. 

WALLACE COUNTY. 

Wallace County Register, Republican; S. L. Wilson, editor, Wallace. 

The Wallace County News, Republican; I. D. Haldeman, editor. News Company, 
publishers, Wallace. 

The Western Times, Republican; Mrs. Kate B. Russell, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Sharon Springs. 

Sharon Springs Leader, Republican; Joe F. White, editor and publisher,^haron 
Springs. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Washington Republican, Republican; H. C. Robinson, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Washington. 

Washington County Register, Republican; J. T. Hole, editor and proprietor, 
Clarence Huff, local editor, Washington. 

The Washington Post, Democratic; Chas. F. Barrett, editor and proprietor, Wash- 
ington. 

The Washington Daily Times, (amateur;) Ben Davidson, editor and publisher, 
Washington; 

The Hanover Democrat, Democratic; J. M. Hood, editor, J. M. Hood and 

Hunger, publishers, Hanover. 

The Clifton Review, Republican; J. A. Branson, editor and proprietor, Clifton. 

The Local News, (semi-weekly,) Republican; Padgett Bros., editors, publishers 
and proprietors, Clifton. 

Greenleaf Journal, Republican; C. P. Knowlton, editor, C. F. Knowlton and Frank 
D. Bliss, publishers, Greenleaf. 

The Greenleaf Herald, Independent; Geo. Gird, editor and publisher, Greenleaf. 

The Greenleaf Safeguard, Democratic; Frank S. Weiler, editor, Greenleaf. 

Haddam City Weekly Clipper, Republican; J. B. Campbell, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Haddam. 

The New Era, Independent; A. P. Crosby, editor, C. F. Barrett, proprietor, Had- 
dam. 

The Barnes Enterprise, Republican; M. H. Williams and M. O. Reitzel, editors, 
Enterprise Publishing Company, publishers, Barnes. 

WICHITA COUNTY. 

Wichita Standard, Republican; C. S. Triplett, editor and publisher, Leoti City. 
The Leoti Transcript, Democratic; Jo. M. Kendall, editor, W. R. Gibbs, publisher 
and proprietor, Leoti City. 

7 



102 STATE JUHTOHICAL SOCIETY. 

The Coronado Star, Democratic; A. B. Sykes, editor and proprietor, Coronado. 
The Wichita County Herald, Republican; D. T. Armstrong, publisher and propri- 
tor, Coronado. 

WILSON COUNTY. 

Wilson County Citizen, Republican; John S. Gilmore, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor,. Fredonia. 

Fredonia Democrat, Democratic; H. L. Crittenden, editor, H. L. Crittenden & Co., 
publishers and proprietors, Fredonia. 

Fredonia Chronicle, Republican; W. R. Dunn, editor and proprietor, Fredonia. 

Neodesha Register, Republican; J. K. Morgan, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Neodesha. 

Altoona Advocate, Independent; Harry Armstrong, editor and publisher, Altooua. 

Benedict Echo, Independent; C. A. McMullen, editor and publisher, Benedict. 

Buffalo Clipper, Republican; J. H. Hale, editor and publisher, Buffalo. 

WOODSON COUNTY. 

Neosho Falls Post, Republican; J. N. Stout, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Neosho Falls. 

The News, Republican; N. B. Buck and R. H. Trueblood, publishers and proprie- 
tors, Yates Center. 

The Independent-Sun, Prohibition; D. H. Burt, editor and proprietor, Yates Cen- 
ter. 

Woodson Democrat. Democratic; Democrat Publishing Company, publishers, 
Yates Center. 

The Toronto Topic, Democratic; Frank Hall, editor and publisher, Toronto. 

WYANDOTTE COUNTY. 

The Wyandotte Herald, Democratic; V. J. Lane & Co., editors, publishers and 
proprietors, Wyandotte. 

The Wyandotte Gazette, (daily and weekly,) Republican; R. B. Armstrong, editor 
and proprietor, Wyandotte. 

Kansas Pioneer, German; Louis Weil, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 

The Kansas Weekly Cyclone, Neutral; Louis Rosenthal and Mark Cromwell, edi- 
tors and publishers, Kansas City. 

The Methodist Record, (monthly,) Religious; Rev. George Winterbourne, editor 
and publisher, Mrs. R. Freeman, associate editor, Kansas City. 

The Argentine Weekly Argus, Independent; Louis Rosenthal and Mark Cromwell, 
editors and publishers, Argentine. 

PAPERS OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES NOW RECEIVED. 
OAIil^'OBNIA. 

The Weekly Post, Post Co., publishers, San Francisco. 

Pacific Rural Press, Dewey A Co., publishers, A. T. Dewey and W. B. Ewer, ed- 
itors, San Francisco. 

Overland Monthly, Overland Monthly Co., publishers, San Francisco. 

California Patron and Agriculturist, J. Chester, managing editor, California Patron 
Co., publishers, San Francisco. 

The Signs of the Times, International Missionary Society, publishers, E. J. Wag- 
goner and Alonzo T. Jones, editors, Oakland. 

Pacific Health Journal and Temperance Advocate, (bi-monthly,) Pacific Press Co., 
publishers; J. N. Loughborough, E. J. Waggoner and A. T. Jones, editors, Oakland. 



Fifth Biennial Rep out. io3 



The American Sentinel, (monthly,) Pacific Press Co., publishers, E. J. Waggoner 
and Alonzo T. Jones, editors, J. H. Waggoner, corresponding editor, Oakland. 

OOIiOBADO. 

Weekly Rocky Mountain News, News Co., publishers, John Arkins, president and 
manager, Denver. 

Silver World, W. E. Mendenhall, editor and proprietor, Lake City. 

Gunnison Review-Press, (tri-weekly,) H. C. Olney, manager, Press Co., publishers, 
Gunnison. 

The Salida Mail, (semi-weekly,) Truesdell «fe Erdlen, proprietors, A. J. TruesdelU 
editor, Salida. 

OONNEOTIOUT. 

Quarterly Journal of Inebriety, T. D. Crothers, M. D., editor; published by the 
American Association for the Cure of Inebriates, Hartford. 

Travelers Record, (monthly,) Travelers Insurance Co., publishers, Hartford. 

DISTBICT OF COLUMBIA. 

The Alpha (monthly), Caroline B. Winslow, editor, Washington. 
The Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office (weekly), Washington. 
United States Publications, Monthly Catalogue, J. H. Hickcox, publisher, Wash- 
ington. 

United States Official Postal Guide, see Boston, Mass. 

Public Opinion, Public Opinion Publishing Co., publishers, Washington. 

FliOBIDA. 

The Florida Dispatch, .A. H. Manville, editor, Chas. W. Da Costa and A. H. Man- 
ville, proprietors, Jacksonville. 

GEOBGIA. 

Southern Industrial Railroad Record, conducted by A. L.> Harris, Atlanta. 

ILLINOIS. 

Semi-Weekly Inter-Ocean, Inter-Ocean Publishing Company, Chicago. 

Industrial World and Iron Worker, F. W, Palmer, editor, Melvin M. Cohen, assist- 
ant manager, Chicago. 

The Standard, Justin A. Smith, editor, Edward Goodman, E. R. & J. S. Dickerson, 
proprietors, Chicago. 

Weekly Drovers' Journal, H. L. Goodall &, Co., publisher, Chicago. 

The Svenska Amerikanaren, Swedish-American Company, publishers, P. A. Sunde- 
lius, President, Chicago. 

American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal, (monthly,) Rev. Stephen D. Peet, 
editor, F. H. Revell, publisher, Chicago. 

The Union Signal, Mary Allen West, editor, Julia Ames, associate editor, Chicago. 

The Open Court, (semi-monthly,) B. F. Underwood, editor and manager, Sara A. 
Underwood, associate editor, Chicago. 

Gaskell's Magazine, (monthly,) A. J. Scarborough, editor, G. A. Gaskell & Com- 
pany, publishers, Chicago. 

The Comrade, (semi-monthly,) H. E. Gerry, managing editor, Chicago. 

The Dial, (monthly,) A. C. McClurg &, Co., publishers, Chicago. 

The Watchman, (semi-monthly,) Y. M. C. A., W. W. Vanarsdale, publisher, Chicago. 

Chicago Journal of Commerce, Journal of Commerce Co., publishers, Chicago. 

Odd Fellows Herald, G. M. Adams, editor, M. T. Scott, publisher, Bloomington. 

Western Plowman, J. W. Warr, editor, L. B. Kuhn, business manager, Warr <fc Kuhn, 
proprietors, Moline. 



104 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



INDIAN TEBBITOBT. 

Cheyenne Transporter, Maffet «fc Merritt, publishers, Darlington. 
The Cherokee Advocate, E. C. Boadi^ot jr., editor, Tahlequah. 
Indian Chieftain, John L. Adair, editor, M. E. Milford, manager. Chief tain Publish- 
ing Co., publishers, Vinita. 

INDIANA. 

The Indiana State Journal, Journal Newspaper Co., publisherSi Indianapolis. 
The Millstone A, Corn Miller, ( monthly,) D. H. Ranck, editor and publisher, Indian- 
apolis. 
Indiana Student, (semi-monthly,) D. Driscoll and D. K. Goss, editors, Bloomington. 
Mennonitisohe Rundschau, Menno^ite Publishing Co., publishers, Elkhart. 



The Iowa Historical Record, (quarterly;) published by the State Historical Society, 
Iowa City. 

liOniBIANA. 

Southwestern Christian Advocate, Marshall W. Taylor, editor; published by the 
Methodist Book Concern, New Orleans. 

MABYIiAND. 

• 

Johns Hopkins University Circulars, (monthly;) printed by John Murphy <k Co., 
Baltimore. 
Jottings, ( monthly,) Insurance; Jottings Co., proprietors, Baltimore. 

MASSAOHUSBTTS. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Register, ( quarterly,) John Ward Dean, 
editor, Boston. 

The Woman's Journal, Lucy Stone, H. B. Blaokwell, and Alice Stone Blackwell, 
editors, Boston. 

The Unitarian Review and Religious Magazine, (monthly,) Jos. Henry Allen, edi- 
tor, Boston. , 

The Youth's Companion, Perry Mason & Co., publishers, Boston. 

Popular Science News, James R. Nichols, and Austin P. Nichols, editors, W. J. 
Rolfe, associate editor, Boston. 

Harvard University Bulletin, Justin Winsor, editor, Cambridge. 

Library Notes, (quarterly,) Melvil Dewey, editor. Library Bureau, publishers, 
Boston. 

Lend a Hand, (monthly magazine of organized philanthropy,) Edward E. Hale, 
D. D., editor, Boston. 

United States Official Postal Guide, (monthly,) Houghton, Mifflin & Co., pub- 
lishers, Boston. 

The Citizen, (monthly,) Citizen Publishing Co., publishers, Boston. 

Estes A Lauriat's Monthly Book Bulletin, Boston. 

The True Educator, (monthly,) Chas. C. Ramsey, editor. South Lancaster. 

MICHIGAN. 

The Fireside Teacher, (monthly), G. H. Bell, publisher. Battle Creek. 
Advent Review, and Sabbath Herald, Seventh-Day Adventist Publishing Associa- 
tion, publishers. Battle Creek. 
The Unitarian, (monthly), Brooke Hereford A J. T. Sunderland, editors, Ann Arbor. 



Fifth biennial Repobt, io5 



Kansas City Times, (daily,) Morrison Munford, President, Times Publishing Co., 
publishers, Kansas City. 

Kansas City Daily Journal, Journal Co., publishers, Kansas City. 

The Kansas City Star, (daily,) Star Publishing Co., publishers, Kansas City. 

Kansas City Live-Stock Indicator, F. D. Coburn, editor, A. D. Simons, commercial 
editor, P. D. Etue, business manager, Kansas City. 

The Kansas City Live-Stock Record, Cuthbert Powell, editor, Ramsey, Millet <fe 
Hudson, proprietors, Kansas City. 

The Kansas City Medical Index, (monthly,) S. Emory Lanphear, editor and pub- 
lisher, Kansas City. 

The Kansas City Record, A. N. Kellogg Newspaper Co., publishers, J. F. Guiwits, 
manager, Kansas City. 

Western Newspaper Union, W. A. Bunker, manager, Kansas City. 

The Mid-Continent, Samuel B. Bell, editor, Mid-Continent Publishing Co., pub- 
lishers, Kansas City. 

The Centropolis, Rev. C. C. Woods, and Rev. D. M. McClellan, editors, James A. 
Hayes, agricultural editor, F. W. Butterlield & Sons, publishers, Kansas City. 

The Witness, J. H. Smart, editor, F. D. Pettit, S. S. editor, J. H. Smart <fe Co., 
publishers, Kansas City. 

The Herald, Herald Publishing Co., publishers, Kansas City. 

The Kansas Magazine, (monthly,) Kansas Magazine Publishing Co., Kansas City. 

Missouri and Kansas Farmer, (monthly,) Cliflfe C. Brooke, editor and publisher, 
Kansas City. 

The Sun, (bi-monthly,) Kansas City. 

St. Joseph Herald, (daily and weekly,) John P. Strong, general manager. Herald 
Publishing Co., publishers, St. Joseph. 

St. Joseph Weekly Gazette, Gazette Publishing Co., publishers, St. Joseph. 

American Journal of Education, (monthly,) J. B. Merwin, managing editor, H. D. 
Shamron, J. Baldwin, G. I. Osborne, and R. C. Norton, associate editors, St. Louis. 

The Central Christian Advocate, Benjamin St. James Fry, editor, Cranston «fe 
Stowe, publishers, St. Louis. 

St. Louis Evangelist, Rev. E. Cooper, D. D., editor, Presbyterian Newspaper Co., 
publishers, Carlos S. Greeley, President, St. Louis. 

Western Newspaper Union, Newspaper Union Co., publishers, St. Louis. 

Western Newsdealer, (quarterly,) Lang & Co., publishers, St. Louis. 

The Altruist, (monthly,) devoted to Common Property and Community Homes; A. 
Longley, editor, St. Louis. 

NEBBASKA. 

Western Resources, H. S. Reed, managing editor, Lincoln. 

The Woman's Tribune, Clara Bewick Colby, editor and publisher, Beatrice. 

Western Newspaper Union, Newspaper Union Publishing Co., publishers, Omaha. 

NEW JEB8EY. 

The Journal of Orthoepy, (monthly,) C. W. Larison, editor, Ringos. 
Orchard and Garden, published by J. T. Lovett, Little Silver. 

NEW MEXICO. 

The Daily Citizen, Thos. Hughes, editor and proprietor, Albuquerque. 



106 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



NEW YOBK. 

New York Tribune, (daily), New York. 

The Daily Register, New York. 

The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, Century Co., publishers, New York. 

Harper's Weekly, New York. 

Magazine of American History, (monthly), Mrs. Martha J. Lamb, editor. New York. 
Scientific American, Munn <k Co., editors and proprietors. New York. 

Science, Science Co., publishers. New York. 

The Swiss Cross, Harlan H. Ballard, editor. New York. 

Electrical Review, Geo. Worthington, editor. Chas. W. Price, associate editor, New 
York. 

The Library Journal, (monthly,) Official Organ of the American Library Associa- 
tion, C. A. Cutter and R. R. Bowker, editors. New York. 

The Cooperative Index to Periodicals, (quarterly,) W. J. Fletcher, editor. New 
York. 

The American Missionary, (monthly.) published by the American Missionary As- 
sociation, W. B. Washburn, LL. D., President, New York. 

The Home Missionary, (monthly,) published by the Home Missionary Society, 
New York. 

Nation, New York. 

Political Science Quarterly, edited by the Faculty of Political Science of Co- 
lumbia College; Ginn &, Co., publishers, New York. 

Appleton Literary Bulletin, D. Appleton & Co., publishers, New York. 

Irish World, Patrick Ford, editor and proprietor, New York. 

New York Weekly Witness, John Dougall & Co., publishers. New York. 

The Voice, Funk & Wagnalls, publishers. New York. 

The Public Service Review, T. F. Rodenbough, general manager. New York. 

The Decorator and Furnisher, (monthly,) Edward Dewson, manager. New York. 

Student's Journal, Andrew J. Graham, editor and proprietor, New York. 

Sabbath Reading, John Dougall A Co., publishers, New York. 

Home Knowledge, (monthly,) Robert A. Ginn, editor; Home Knowledge Associa- 
tion, proprietors. New York. 

The Phonographic World, (monthly,) E. N. Miner, publisher. New York City. 

The Library Magazine, John B. Alden, publisher. New York. 

The National Temperance Advocate, J. N. Stearns, publishing agent. New York. 

The Publishers' Weekly, (a book trade journal,) R. R. Bowker, manager. New York. 

Sheltering Arms, (monthly,) New York. 

The Husbandman, Elmira. 

OHIO. 

Magazine of Western History, illustrated, (monthly,) Cleveland. 

Ohio Archteological and Historical Quarterly, Prof. George W. Knight, Dr. I. W. 
Andrews, Prof. W. H. Venabld, Prof. B. A. Hinsdale, and Prof. G. F. Wright, editorial 
committee; A. H. Smythe, publisher, Columbus. 

Deutsch-Amerikanisches Magazin, (quarterly,) H. A. Rattermann, editor. 

The Cincinnati W^eekly Times, Cincinnati. 

The Christian PresP, published by the Western Tract Society. 

Christian Standard, Isaac Errett, editor, Cincinnati. 

American Grange Bulletin, F. P. Wolcott, editor, Cincinnati. 

Farm and Fireside, (semi-monthly,) Mast, Crowell & Kirkpatrick, editors and pro- 
prietors, Springfield. 



Fifth biennial Report. io7 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Public Ledger, (daily,) G. W. Childs, editor and publisher, Philadelphia. 

Faith and Works, published by the Woman's Christian Association; Mrs. A. H. 
Franciscus, Philadelphia. 

The Naturalist's Leisure Hour, A. E. Foote, editor and publisher, Philadelphia. 

Farmers' Friend and Grange Advocate, R. H. Thomas, editor, Mechanicsburg. 

Zion's Watch Tower, (monthly,) C. T. Russell, editor, Alleghany. 

The Morning Star, (monthly,) published in the interest of Indian education; R. H. 
Pratt, A. J. Standing, and Marianna Burgess, editors; Indian Industrial School, 
Carlisle. 

Building Association and Home Journal, (monthly,) Michael J. Brown, editor, 
Philadelphia. 

TEXAS. 

' Texas Live-Stock Journal, Philip H. Hale, editor, Fort Worth. 

VEBMONT. 

The Woman's Magazine, (monthly,) Esther T. Housh, editor; Frank E. Housh «fe 
Co., publishers, Brattleboro. 

WISCONSIN. 

Wisconsin State Journal, David Atwood, proprietor, Madison. 

FBANOE. 

Sooi^te de Geographie, compte rendu des Stances de la Commission Centrale, 
(semi-monthly,) Paris. 

Bulletin de la Societe de Geographie, (quarterly,) Paris. 

Chronique de la Societe des Gens de Lettres, (monthly,) Paris. 

Bulletin des Stances de la Societe Nationale d' Agriculture de France, (monthly,) 
Paris. 

Bulletin de la Ministere de I'Agriculture, (monthly,) Paris. 



FINANCES. 
The finances of the Society for the year ending January 18th, 1887, in- 
cluding the Treasurer's account of receipts and expenditures, and the ex- 
penditures from the appropriations made by the Legislature, of which detailed 
statements are given in accompanying papers, will be found on the next 
page.* 

♦The following is the financial statement made by the Board at the Annual Meeting, January 19, 
1886, for the year ending at that date: 

1885. RECEIPTS. 

Jan. 20, Balance of appropriation to June 30, 1885 $1,087 02 

Jan. 20, Balance in hauds of the Treasurer of the Society 14 20 

July 1, Appropriations to June 30, 1886 3,250 00 

Receipts from membership fees 90 00 

Total :.. 84,441 22 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries and clerk hire $2,093 00 

Postage, freight, and contingent 449 05 

Purchase of bool£S 653 67 3,195 72 

Balance $1,245 50 



108 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



BE0EIPT8. 

1886. 

Jan. 19, Appropriations to June 30, 1886 $1,249 26 

Jan. 19, Balance in hands of Treasurer of Society, fees 11 20 

Feb. 23, Miscellaneous appropriation, extra clerk hire 1,000 00 

July 1, Appropriations to June 30, 1887 3,250 00 

Receipts from membership fees 62 00 

Total $6,562 46 

EXPENDITUBE8. 

Salaries and clerk hire from general appropriations, $2,062 65 

Clerk hire from miscellaneous appropriation 677 38^ 

Clerk hire from membership receipts 60 00 

Purchase of books 677 67 

Postage, freight, and contingent 631 21 4,098 71 

Balance unexpended $1,463 76 

The estimates for appropriations which the Board submits, for each of the 
two ensuing fiscal years, are as follows : 

Salary of Secretary $1,600 

Clerk hire 5^,000 

Purchase of books 1,000 

Postage, freight, and contingent 1,000 

And for deficiencies for the present fiscal year 1,000 

On motion of Hon. James F. Legate, the item of clerk hire for each of 
the two fiscal years was by unanimous vote of the Society increased to 
$3,000. 

The reading and consideration of the report of the Board of Directors 
having been concluded, on motion it was then adopted. 

General Wilder, from the Committee on Nominations, made the following 
report : 

Your Committee on Nominations recommend the following persons for members 
of the Board of Directors for the term ending January, 1890: John G. Pratt, May- 
wood; J. B. Abbott, DeSoto; N.A.Adams, Manhattan; J. B. Clogston, Eureka; Geo. 
W. Knapp, Clyde; G. W. Veale, Topeka; A. S. Johnson, Topeka; L. B. Kellogg, Em- 
poria; H. H. Williams, Osawatomie; E. B. Crew, Delphos; T. A. McNeal, Medicine 
Lodge; Thomas A. Osborn, Topeka; E. B. Purcell, Manhattan; John W. Scott, lola; 
A. L. Coleman, Centralia; W. S. Tilton, Wa-Keeney; Geo. W. Doty, Burlingame; J. 
Wayne Amos, Gypsum City; T. S. Haun, Jetmore; J. R. Burton, Abilene; J. H. Down- 
ing, Hays City; C E. Faulkner, Salina; J. K. Hudson, Topeka; Cyrus Leland, Troy; 
J. B. McAfee, Topeka; C. H. Kimball, Parsons; Chas. Williamson, Washington; A. W. 
Smith, McPherson; T. B. Murdock, El Dorado; Noble L. Prentis, Atchison; John H. 
Rice, Fort Scott; H. B. Kelly, McPherson; T. T. Taylor, Hutchinson. 

And to fill the following vacancies in the term ending January, 1888: Thos. P. 
Fenlon, Leavenworth, vice Wirt W. Walton, deceased; T. A. Hurd, Leavenworth, vice 
W. B. Clarke, removed from the State. 

The report was then adopted, and the persons so nominated for Directors 
were elected. 



Fifth biennial repobt. . io9 

The business proceedings of the annual meeting having been concluded, 
President Anthony delivered a brief address relating to the subject of the 
history of the Society, and the importance of the work it was carrying for- 
ward. 

Brief addresses were also made by Hon. Edward Russell of Lawrence, 
ex-Chief Justice Kingman of Topeka, Hon. Jas. F. Legate of Leavenworth, 
Hon. T. Dwight Thacber of Topeka, Hon. Chas. Williamson of Washing- 
ton, Hon. P. G. Lowe of Leavenworth, Mr. L. R. Elliott of Manhattan, 
Major Henry Inman of Ellsworth, Hon. John E. Rastall of Burlingame, 
and Gov. C. V. Eskridge of Emporia. 

On motion of Hon. John Speer, a resolution was adopted expressive of 
the sympathy of the Society with Hon. Kersey Coates, of Kansas City, Mo., 
an honorary member of the Society, on account of his severe illness, of which 
the members of the Society had just been apprised. 

The annual meeting of the Society then adjourned. 



MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



At the conclusion of the proceedings of the annual meeting of the Society, 
a meeting of the Board of Directors was convened, on the call of the Presi- 
dent, Colonel D. R. Anthony, who occupied the chair. 

On motion, the Board proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing 
two years. The election resulted as follows : 

President, Daniel W. Wilder, Hiawatha; Vice Presidents, Henry H. 
Williams, Osawatomie, and Thomas A. McNeal, Medicine Lodge ; Secretary, 
Franklin G. Adams, Topeka; Treasurer, John Francis, Topeka. 

President Wilder, being then called to the chair, thanked the Society for 
the honor conferred upon him. 

The President then announced the following committees : 

Executive Committee: Governor John A. Martin, Hon. T. Dwight 
Thacher, Hon. P. I. Bonebrake, Major N. A. Adams, and Hon. F. P. Baker, 

Legislative Committee: Hon. Benjamin F. Simpson, Hon. E. B. Purcell, 
and Hon. Edward Russell. 

The persons nominated at the afternoon meeting for honorary and cor- 
responding members were then unanimously chosen. 

On motion, the meeting of the Board then adjourned. 



SIXTH BIENNIAL REPOET. 



The Board of Directors met in the rooms of the Society, Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 20, 1888, at 3:30 p. m., the following members being present: Hon. John 
Francis, Hon. V. J. Lane, Hon. F. P. Baker, Judge S. A. Kingman, Hon. 
D. W. Wilder, Hon. James Smith, Maj. Benjamin F. Simpson, Hon. James 
F. Legate, Hon. W. C. Edwards, Hon. E. J. Dallas, Hon. Martin Mohler, 
Hon. T. D. Thacher, and the Secretary, F. G. Adams. 

Letters were read from Hon. Edward Russell, President of the Society, 
and from Prof I. T. Goodnow and Hon. L. R. Elliott, expressing regrets 
at their inability to be present at the meeting. 

The President and Vice-Presidents being absent. Judge Kingman was 
called to the chair, on motion of Hon. F. P. Baker. 

The Secretary then read the report, which was approved on motion of 
Mr. Legate, and ordered for publication. 

On motion of Mr. Legate, it was voted that a committee be appointed, 
composed of three citizens of Topeka, to act in connection w^ith the Presi- 
dent and Secretary of the Society, to confer Avith the Executive Council and 
the Legislature, and to take charge of the matter of procuring suitable rooms 
in the State House, when completed, for the library and collections of the 
Society. The President appointed F. P. Baker, T. D. Thacher and John 
Francis members of the committee. 

The Secretary called the attention of the Board to a letter from Senator 
Plumb, transmitting a letter of Col. R. J. Hinton, in which the latter pro- 
poses to dispose of some historical manuscripts and papers which he has 
collected. On motion, the Secretary was directed to confer with Colonel 
Hinton upon the subject. 

On motion of Mr. Edwards, the following resolution was adopted, and 
ordered to be submitted to the annual meeting for its consideration : 

Whereas, The Kansas State Historical Society has always considered that its 
library and collections were being gathered and made up wholly as the property of 
the State; and, whereas, the Legislature, by act of March 10, 1879, declared the Society 
to be a trustee of the State, and its library and collections of every kind to be the 
inalienable property of the State: therefore, 

Resolved, That this Society hereby fornaally declares it to be the intention of the 
Society, that its library and collections hitherto gathered, and all that shall hereafter 
be gathered, are, and are to become the exclusive property of the State of Kansas, 
for the use of the people of the State; and the Society fully accepts the terms and 
conditions expressed and contained in said act of March 10, 1879. 

On motion, the meeting adjourned. 

(Ill) 



112 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS, NOV. 20, 1888. 



By vote of the Board of Directors at the meeting of January 17th, 1888, 
the time for concluding the yearly work of the Society and making up the 
annual report was changed from the third Tuesday of January to the third 
Tuesday in November. This change was made for the object of giving 
time for the printing of the Society's biennial reports previous to their pre- 
sentation to the annual meeting, and before the meeting of the Legislature. 
The report here presented, then, exhibits the work of the Society during 
the period commencing with January 18th, 1887, and ending with Novem- 
ber 19th, 1888, or about one year and ten months, instead of for the full 
period of two years, as has been the case with former biennial reports. 

SUMMARY. 

During the period covered by this report there have been added to the 
library of the Society, of bound volumes, 1,619; unbound volumes and 
pamphlets, 9,250 ; volumes of newspapers and periodicals, 1,995 ; single news- 
papers, 1,734; maps, atlases and charts, 116; manuscripts, 662; pictures 
and >yorks of art, 275 ; scrip, currency, coins and medals, 32 ; war relics, 
12; miscellaneous contributions, 229. 

The library additions of books, pamphlets, and newspaper files, not in- 
cluding duplicates, number 12,864 volumes. Of these, 12,001 have been 
procured by gift, and 863 by purchase. 

The whole number of volumes in the library at the present time is as 
follows, namely: 9,971 bound volumes; 30,353 unbound volumes; 7,981 
bound newspaper files and volumes of periodicals ; in all, 48,305 volumes. 

YEARLY GROWTH OF THE LIBRARY. 

The following is a statement of the yearly growth of the library in thir- 
teen years, 1876 to 1888, inclusive: \ 



Date. 


Volumes 
hookt. 


Volumes 
newspapers 

periodieaU. 


Pamphlets. 


Total yearly 
accessions. 


Ye<irly 
total 
qfthe 

library. 


1876 


280 
115 

1,237 
290 
448 
414 

1,669 
307 
782 

1,088 

1,772 
768 
866 


64 
160 
710 
276 
448 
876 
613 
403 
807 
678 
1,578 
1,007 
988 


74 
601 
1,184 
491 
1,146 
1,127 
2,721 
1,088 
2,763 
2,033 
7,975 
1,643 
7,707 


408 
766 
3,131 
1,056 
2,042 
1,916 
4,903 
1,798 
4,302 
3,799 
11,320 
3,303 
9,561 


408 


1877 


1,174 


i879!.!!!!!.""r."!!!!!"!"!!!!""!!!!!!!.'.'."!!.'....'..'..*... 


4,305 
5,361 
7,403 


1880 


1881 


9,319 
14,222 
16,020 
20,322 
24,121 


1882 


1883 


1884, 

1885 


1886 

1887 


35,441 
38,744 


1888 


48,305 






Totals 


9,971 


7,981 


80,363 


48,305 









Sixth Biennial Re poet. 113 

The tables which the report contains show perhaps as well as tables and 
exhibits can, the character and extent of the work done by the Society dur- 
ing the period which the report covers. 

Included in the pamphlet accessions are 5,393 newspaper cuttings, which 
have been mounted and placed in the library classification. These are the 
accumulations of many years. They relate chiefly to Kansas history, local 
and general, to biography, proceedings of local pioneer gatherings, and of 
various State societies and associations. Mounted in scrap-books and placed 
in the library, they are thus made convenient for reference. 

MENTION OF SOME DONATIONS. 

Among the most liberal of the donors of books and pamphlets may be 
mentioned Rev. S. L. Adair, of Osawatomie; Hon. F. P. Baker, Hon. T. D. 
Thacher, Mr. A. S. Huling and lion. D. M. Valentine, of Topeka; Prof. 
I. T. Goodnow and Mrs. B. F. Mudge, of Manhattan ; Hon. Geo. W. Mar- 
tin, Kansas City; Hon. Eli Thayer, of Worcester, Massachusetts; Dr. Sam- 
uel A. Green, Secretary of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston ; and 
the Essex Institute, Salem, Massachusetts. Prof. Goodnow has given from 
his thirty-three years' savings in Kansas a mass of historical material of in- 
estimable value, consisting of books, pamphlets, magazines, manuscripts, 
maps, newspaper files and other papers. Hon. D. M. Valentine has given 
the Society ninety-four pamphlets, chiefly consisting of Kansas political and 
other publications thoughtfully saved by him during his thirty years' resi- 
dence in Kansas. One of the most valuable gifts of books to the Society has 
been that made by Hon. George W. Martin, now of Kansas City, Kansas, 
consisting of 100 copies of " Wilder's Annals," 1875 edition. This book has 
been much sought for by libraries and institutions with which our Society 
makes exchanges, and the gift enables us to effect exchanges securing the 
augmentation of our library by many valuable volumes otherwise beyond 
our reach. 

Of the 662 manuscript papers contributed, there are many which are of 
historical interest. Among such may be mentioned the record books of 
early Topeka social organizations, given by Mrs. Ashbaugh ; the muster- 
rolls, given by Judge L. D. Bailey, containing a record of the first military 
organization in what is now Lyon county; Dr. George W. Brown's contri- 
butions to anti-slavery and early Kansas history ; the contributions made to 
John Brown history by John Brown, jr., Theodore Botkin, Hon. Horace L. 
Jones, Hon. O. E. Morse, Col. William A. Phillips, and Capt. J. A. Pike; 
the autobiographical sketches by lady editors of Kansas newspapers; the 
mass of petitions of the women of Kansas for municipal suffrage, presented 
to the Legislature of 1887 ; and the voluminous original records of Kansas 
history contained in the contributions made by Mrs. Lawrence, the widow 
of Amos A. Lawrence, a most liberal benefactor of Kansas in the earliest 
days of trial. These manuscripts contain a large portion of the records of 



114 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



the work of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, of which Mr. Law- 
rence was the treasurer. 

Of maps and atlases donated to the library, the atlas to accompany the 
Ohio Geological Survey, given by Mr. Robert Clarke, of Cincinnati, ac- 
companied as the gift was by that of the volumes of the Survey, is worthy 
of special mention ; as is also the gift by Mr. F. E. Jerome, of Russell, of 
the atlas to accompany the Michigan Geological Survey. Mr. John P. Ed- 
wards, of Quincy, Illinois, has added to the gifts before made by him of 
Kansas maps and atlases, by contributing large wall maps of three Kansas 
and one Missouri county. Professor Goodnow's very large gift to the So- 
ciety was acccompanied by eighteen valuable maps. The gift made by J. 
H. Meacham of his voluminous illustrated atlas of Brown and Nemaha 
counties is an important contribution to the materials of Kansas history. 
The Iowa atlas given by Mr. A. W. Stubbs' is a valuable record of the history 
of a neighboring State. Messrs. Wasser and Flint, of Girard, have added 
again to their contributions of Kansas maps. Mr. Henry Kuhn's gift of 
Boudinot's map of the Indian Territory is an important contribution. 
Rand, McNally & Co. have added largely to the gifts which they had be- 
fore made of maps of the States and Territories. The archaeological map 
made and given to the Society by Mr. William Griffing is an interesting 
record of original investigation of the antiquities of Kansas. 

Noteworthy among the pictures added to the gallery is a crayon portrait 
of Senator Ingalls, a gift of the artist, 'Mr. A. Montgomery; a crayon por- 
trait of Col. Alexander S. Johnson, given by himself by special request; 
and a portrait of Chester Thomas, sr., given by members of his family. 
Mr. Robert Tracy, of St. Joseph, Mo., has given photo portraits of Maj. 
William P. Richardson and Dr. John H. Stringfellow, both prominent 
figures in the earliest period of Kansas Territorial history; the family and 
friends of Prof B. F. Mudge have given a portrait of that most prominent 
early worker in Kansas science; Thomas W. Heatley has given an original 
photo portrait of Richard Realf, and a fine crayon copy of this portrait has 
been given the Society by Mrs. Peacock, who executed it; H. T. Martin, 
the photographer, has contributed cabinet photos of members of the Legis- 
lature and the^executive officers of 1887-8, 136 in number. Numerous other 
portraits and pictures have also been contributed to the Society's very large 
collection of this class of historical material. Ex-Gov. Frederick P. Stanton, 
now a resident of Farmwell, Virginia, has given the Society a fine marble 
bust of himself, executed many years ago by Horatio Stone. This gift will 
ever be regarded by the Society and by the people of Kansas as an inter- 
esting memorial of one whose official career was marked by invaluable 
services in times of great need. 

Conspicuous among the contributions is the gold medal which was pre- 
sented by Victor Hugo and his associates in France, in 1874, to the widow 
of Capt. John Brown, in testimony of the recognition by the donors of the 



Sixth biennial Be poet. 115 

supreme sacrifice made by the Kansas martyr in behalf of human rights. 
The medal has been deposited with the Historical Society by Capt. John 
Brown, jr., and his brothers and sisters, regarding as they do our Society 
as the appropriate custodian of the memorials of their illustrious father. 

Of war memorials may be mentioned the gift by Maj. James B. Abbott of 
his sword, a relic of the early troubles in Kansas, as well as of the war of the 
Rebellion, also the gift by the same of an English musket, a relic of Confed- 
erate arms employed on our border in Price's raid, and a Pro-Slavery flag, a 
relic of the Kansas Territorial troubles; the gift by Mrs. Hannah Ritchie 
of the sword and gun of Gen. John Ritchie, memorials of the services ren- 
dered by a distinguished and honored pioneer citizen of Kansas in the war 
for the preservation of the Union. Hon. A. Washburn gives an interesting 
relic of the war of the Revolution, and Dr. S. B. Prentiss the same of the 
Pro-Slavery troubles of 1856. Interesting relics of the war of the Rebellion 
have been given by Mrs. Lititia Watkins, Mr. W. A. Warren, J. W. Rich- 
ardson, W. E. Richey, and Mrs. Sophia Ashbaugh. 

Of files of newspapers. Rev. S. L. Adair has given thirty-six volumes, 
Hon. F. P. Baker sixteen, and Prof. I. T. Goodnow sixty-two. These with 
the others contributed swell the number of files given the Society in addi- 
tion to those contributed in regular issues, to one hundred and twenty-eight 
in number. These added to the volumes of newspapers and periodicals which 
have accumulated through regular newspaper issues received, chiefly from 
gifts, make up 1,995 volumes of this most valuable class of historical ma- 
terials received during the period covered by the report. 

CHARACTER OF THE LIBRARY. 

The lists and tables which this report contains show that there is being 
made up by this Society for the use of the people of Kansas a library of 
history and reference, remarkable in its growth, and still more remarkable 
in the character and value of the materials which it contains. They show 
that notwithstanding much embarrassment the growth of the library and 
collections has steadily continued from year to year during the thirteen 
years of the Society's existence, and that in that time there have been placed 
on the library shelves more than forty-eight thousand volumes of books, 
newspaper files and pamphlets; and in addition to these, this and former re- 
ports show a collection of manuscripts, pictures, statuary, relics and objects 
of historical illustration of every kind and description almost countless in 
number. 

The character of these materials is such as was contemplated in the or- 
ganization of the Society and such as the law directs the Society to bring 
into its library and collections. They are chiefly the printed and written 
records of the people of Kansas; records which go to show the sacrifices 
and achievements of our first settlers in establishing freedom on our soil ; 
records of the daily, weekly, monthly and yearly transactions of the people 



116 State Historical Society. 

in social, moral, educational and material progress; in the building-up of 
our towns, with their depots of trade, their manufactories, and varied in- 
dustrial establishments; records which show the unexampled progress in the 
construction of lines of railroad transportation ; in the opening and plant- 
ing of farms, orchards and vineyards; records of the march, year by year, 
of our frontier people toward the border, still experimenting with the powers 
of nature, and still subduing obstacles which for all the ages before had 
been deemed insurmountable. The history of the struggles and triumphs 
of the people of Kansas, from the earliest day to the present, have been 
and are being more fully recorded by pen and printing-press than ever be- 
fore was that of any people ; and our Historical Society is very fully gather- 
ing in and placing accessibly on its shelves the record as thus being made 
up. The published statistics of the libraries of the country show that the 
library of the Kansas Historical Society is the largest historical library 
west of the Mississippi river, and the largest but one west of the Alleghany 
Mountains. When it is considered that this library is not composed of 
evanescent books of the literature of the day, written and printed for the 
amusement of the hour, and then no longer sought for reference or for any 
other use, but that it chiefly contains the original records of the facts in 
the history of our own pioneer people, of the first generation of the founders 
and builders of the State, it may be well said that when we speak of its 
remarkable growth in the number of its volumes, we present a feature of 
but slight consideration compared with that of the character of the volumes 
which it contains as original materials of history. 

And not only is the history of our own people being gathered into this 
library, but as the law directs, the library is being made one of very widely 
extended reference, in general history, in science, and in all subjects of 
social, educational, and literary research. 

RELATION OF THE SOCIETY TO THE STATE. 
The kind of work being done by the Society, and the relation which it sus- 
tains to the State, are peculiar; hence the duties imposed, and the privileges 
conferred upon it by law, are not so well understood as they should be. There 
is but one other institution in the country so nearly like this in object and 
scope, and in its connection with the State, as to admit of comparison. The 
Wisconsin Historical Society is much like ours, and afforded the model 
uix)n which our work in its incipiency was planned and in the main has 
since been carried forward. Both are voluntary associations. Their mem- 
bers and officers are private citizens elected by the societies. Their mode of 
work has been devised, and is being carried forward upon plans, rules and 
regulations made by themselves. But what they do is for the people of the 
State. Their library and all their collections are the property of the State, 
placed in rooms provided by the State, and are inalienable and irremovable. 
The expenses of the work of the Society are chiefly defrayed by the State. 



Sixth Biennial Repbt. 117 

'I'his relation of the State Historical Society to the State is essential to the 
existence of a historical society in a new State where there are no opulent 
citizens to found and maintain such a society. So far as there has been any 
experience in such work, it is the relation best calculated to secure the 
making up of a public historical collection in any State ; a work which it is 
everywhere conceded every State should have by some means done for it, 
and the neglect of which is greatly deplored where it has been left undone. 
Such a society is greatly stimulated to exertion to fulfill the public require- 
ments. Where by law the society is made the trustee and servant of the 
State its work is not perfunctory like that of the State official, whose 
term of service is determined upon political considerations. The existence 
of the Society and its continued support are dependent upon its fulfillment 
of the public demand and expectation year by year and continually. This 
has been and must ever be the experience of such a relation to the State of 
a voluntary association of this character. 

LEGAL REQUIREMENTS. 

The act of the Legislature of 1879, by which the Society was made the trus- 
tee of the State and its collections the property of the State, makes it the 
duty of the Society to make up a library of " books, maps and other materials 
illustrative of the history of Kansas in particular and the West generally ; 
. . . to purchase books to supply deficiencies in the various departments 
of its collections, and to procure by gift and exchange such scientific and 
historical reports of the Legislatures of other States, of railroads, reports of 
geological and other scientific surveys, and such other books, maps, charts 
and materials as will facilitate the investigation of historical, scientific, so- 
cial, educational and literary subjects, and to cause the same to be properly 
bound; to catalog the collections of the said Society for the more convenient 
reference of all persons who may have occasion to consult the same; to bi- 
ennially prepare for publication a report of its collections and such other 
matter relating to its transactions as may be useful to the public; and to 
keep its collections arranged in convenient and suitable rooms, to be pro- 
vided and furnished by the Secretary of State, as the Board of Directors 
shall determine." 

Considering the novelty of such a relation of a State to an association of 
its private citizens, it is not surprising that the duties thus imposed by the 
State and the compensation given for performing them should not for a 
time be properly adjusted. The Society has not been in the habit of com- 
plaining of lack of appreciation and compensation ; for the public appre- 
ciation has always and everywhere been made most manifest, and the Society 
has always been confident that the lack of adequate means for carrying on 
its work would prove to be but temporary. The membership of the Society 
now extends to every county in the State. The most valuable part of the 
current accessions to its librarv, namely the newspaper issues, and locally 



118 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



printed matter, are being freely contributed by members of the Society, 
from every county in the State. The faithful performance of the most im- 
portant part of its work, that of caring for these local contributions, employs 
more than half the time of the clerical force of the Society. It is not to be 
supposed that a society whose work is being done wholly for the people of 
the State, whose working membership embraces every part of the State, and 
the results of whose work have come to be appreciated by all classes of in- 
telligent people in the State, will remain for a much longer period in a state 
of embarrassment for want of means to carry forward the work assigned to it. 

BROAD FIELD OF WORK. 

The duty imposed by the Legislature upon the Society to place in its 
library with the publications of our own State, those of other States and 
those of learned, social and scientific institutions generally, so as to make 
up a library which shall give every citizen of the State facilities for the in- 
vestigation of "historical, social, educational and literary subjects," are so 
comprehensive that its library undertaking may be said to be unlimited in 
its object and scope. 

The broad field from which the materials of this library are being gathered 
has proven to be a very fruitful one. While our best garnerings are from 
within our own State, the limits of the work of the Society are boundless. 
So interwoven has been the history of Kansas with that of the principal 
events of the whole country, and so much has the work of the Society 
enlisted a general interest, its library has come to be the recipient, largely 
by gift, of not only the materials of the history of the whole country, but 
of everything of a literary and scientific character relating to all parts of 
the country. The library is becoming, at a cost involving little more than 
that of freight and postage, care and keeping, a library of reference very 
broad in its scope. Its growth would be far more rapid, and its accessi- 
bility and consequent usefulness to the public would be far greater, were 
adequate means given the Society to employ a sufficient clerical force, and 
if the State had been able to fulfill its undertaking to furnish "suitable and 
convenient rooms for the collections." 

The State of Kansas in legalizing the work of the State Historical Soci- 
ety and giving such a breadth and scope to the objects aimed to be accom- 
plished by it, intended no half-way work. The action of the Legislature 
was prompted by the conviction which has always rested in the minds of 
our people, that Kansas has made and is making a history unique in its 
character and unparalleled in the magnitude of the principles which had 
been and are being vindicated and exemplified on our soil. The materials 
of our own history, and of our world-wide related history, are such as no 
State ever before had spread out for the gathering. 

And the willing helpers in the work are as widespread as are the mate- 
rials. The interest in the work of the Kansas Historical Society is as broad 



Sixth biennial Mefobt. 119 

as the country itself. Said the Secretary of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society: "Massachusetts helped to redeem and make Kansas, — it will help 
its Historical Society." Said Henry Ward Beecher in accepting a mem- 
bership in our Society : " I need not say how deep an interest I have taken 
in her noble progress and renowned prosperity. She well deserves the title 
'New England of the West.'" Said William Lloyd Garrison: "The for- 
mation of such a society is cause for special congratulation, and an event of 
historical importance far beyond the limits of the State; — for there is noth- 
ing more thrilling in American history than the struggle to secure freedom 
and free institutions to Kansas — a struggle which, if it had terminated 
otherwise than it did, would have been fraught with appalling consequences 
not only to the State itself, but to the whole country. How different would 
have been the fate of Kansas, if slavery had been successfully established 
upon her soil ! Under the plastic hand of freedom, how astonishing has been 
her growth in intelligence, industry, enterprise, population, and material 
prosperity ; and at the present time what strides she is making in develop- 
ing her ample resources, and how irresistible is the magnetism by which she 
is drawing to herself from all quarters a mighty immigration that can 
scarcely fail to place her, ere long, in the front rank of States. This is her 
fitting recompense for having gone through a baptism of blood and an 
ordeal of fire with such firmness and devotion to the sacred cause of free- 
dom. May her 'peace be as a river,' and her 'prosperity as the waves of 
the sea.' " 

It is in the preservation of the materials of the history of the growth and 
development of Kansas during the past thirteen years that the work of the 
Society is most complete and comprehensive. Before our Society had begun 
its work, the printed materials of the history of the earlier days had in 
large part been dissipated and destroyed. The materials of the present 
day, as they are daily and weekly being issued from more than a thousand 
busy printing-presses, are all being saved in the library of our Society. In 
its growth and development Kansas has gone forward until it has reached, 
with all the appliances of the best civilization the world has ever known, 
the remotest boundaries of oui* State; and now are to be found newspaper 
presses in every county. These papers make a record, week by week, of all 
the events occurring in the growth of these new counties, and complete files 
of all are being preserved in the library of the State Historical Society, the 
gift of their generous and thoughtful publishers. 

PROVINCE OF A HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

That the Kansas State Historical Society is well fulfilling the mission 
assigned it by the Legislature, and according to the highest standards es- 
tablished for an institution charged by a State with the duty of forming a 
library of historical and other materials for the use of the people, may be 
quoted here a single testimonial as to what ought to be done for the accom- 



120 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

plishraent of such object. It is the testimony of Dr. Henry A. Homes, who 
for forty years, and till his 'death a few months since, was the eminent libra- 
rian of the general library of the State of New York. It is found in an 
article prepared by him contained in the United States Government publi- 
cation entitled, " Public Libraries in the United States of America; their 
History, Condition, and Management," published by the Department of the 
Interior, in 1876. In a paragraph in which he makes a statement of the 
special province of a general State library, as distinct and separate from 
that of a library of law reports, statutes, journals of the Legislature, and 
State documents, he says: 

. "A State library will, of course, make it one of its special aims to collect works of 
American history in general just so far as the means at its disposal will admit. But 
of all the purposes for which it exists, none respond so directly to the wants of the 
largest number of the citizens of a State as to aim to collect all the materials access- 
ible to illustrate the history of the State, its counties, its towns, and its citizens. 
The authorities of the library will therefore be attentive to secure all local histories 
and biographies, manuscript collections of the papers of its eminent citizens, the 
official proceedings of all counties and towns, reports of all societies, charitable, 
commercial, manufacturing, military and secret, and as many of the newspapers 
printed in the State as can be obtained, with its almanacs, and business and town 
directories. To these will naturally be added works in science and the arts which 
relate more particularly to the productions of the State. An honorable historic 
consciousness will be promoted by securing works of merit of all kinds written by 
citizens of the State." 

NEWSPAPERS AS MATERIALS OF HISTORY. 

The following \S quoted from the same high authority : 

"Much might be said regarding the value of the different classes of books just 
mentioned, a value which grows with successive years. We will, however, single out 
from among them for particular notice the class of newspapers. For many towns 
and counties they are the only printed record of the earliest facts of local history. 
Their value in libraries is already recognized in our Western States. The Indiana 
State Library receives twenty-eight newspapers as an annual gift; Minnesota was 
receiving forty in 1862; and Ohio received twenty-eight. The New Jersey Library 
invites donations of the same kind. There can be little doubt that the publishers 
of a large proportion of the newspapers of any State would preserve and give to the 
State the file of each year, on the single condition that it should be promptly bound 
and be made accessible to the public. It would be equitable and useful to provide 
by statute that each publisher sending a newspaper should receive a copy of the laws 
of the session." 

This eminent librarian singles out from among the most important of all 
the subjects of collection the local newspaper. And yet what a meager 
showing he makes as to what the State libraries of the country were twelve 
years ago doing in this department of work : Indiana, twenty-eight news- 
papers; Minnesota, forty; Ohio, twenty -eight. And they are doing no 
better to-day. State libraries never have effectively done the most appro- 
priate work for a library of local history and general reference for the 



Sixth biennial Report. I'll 

people. They have a paramount object besides, and to that their chief 
work is naturally and necessarily confined. 

It was left to the voluntary associations of private citizens forming the 
Wisconsin Historical Society and the Kansas Historical Society, to prop- 
erly inaugurate and carryforward this kind of work. The board of direct- 
ors of the Wisconsin Historical Society at their annual meeting in January 
last, reported as contained in their library, 5,^40 volumes of newspaper 
iiles; and to this class of library materials they particularly refer as being 
^'the fountain-head of modern history." 

SPIRIT OF THE KANSAS PRESS. 

The New York State Librarian suggested that publishers should be com- 
pensated for their newspapers. That might do for New York, Indiana, and 
Ohio. But Kansas newspaper publishers see the matter in a different light ; it 
was they who organized the Society, and no sooner was it organized than they 
began freely to give their regular issues. Not only that, but the veteran 
editor who had published his paper from aw-ay back in the early history of 
Kansas Territory got together his scattered duplicates until he had made up 
for the Society a complete file, not a number missing. At least one file thus 
given w^e have, covering a period now of more than thirty years. So the 
publisher of the newspaper starting in a frontier county, hearing of the work 
our Society is doing, of which he is pretty sure to hear even before his first 
issue is out, with alacrity puts the State Historical Society on his mail 
book. Thus the work of the newspaper man's enterprise, zeal and ambi- 
tion goes to posterity. And who shall say that he will not do better work ; 
more for the good of the people a history of whose doings he records, than 
if he felt that the issues from his press were but for a day, speedily to pass 
from the face of the earth as has been the common experience where no his- 
torical society has existed to save the issues of the press and place them 
between fire-proof walls built by the State for the preservation of its sacred 
archives. The newspaper men and women of Kansas are putting it in the 
power of the Historical Society which they founded to do better work in 
making up a library of the best materials of local history than is being 
done by any other society or institution in the world. 

That the publishers of Kansas newspapers appreciate the work being 
done by the Historical Society w^hich they established, a single quotation 
may be given from among hundreds. Says the editor of a leading daily : 

"This Society, as its name implies, is the custodian and conservator of the his- 
tory of Kansas. A copy of almost every newspaper published in this State, from 
its organization, and prior to that period, through its earliest Territorial days, may 
be found on iile in its rooms. I]rom that established in 1854 down to the journals 
of to-day, a copy of each is there carefully preserved, thus making a continuous 
and unbroken history of the State to-day. A copy of every book written, by Kan- 
sans, may be found on its shelves; so of thousands of foreign newspapers and 
pamphlets; and all the addresses and speeches embodying matters relating to Kan- 



122 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 

sas affairs are there compiled and stowed away. A copy of each annual Agricultural 
Report, which, by the way, are the fullest, completest, and most accurate reports of the 
kind prepared by any State in the Union, is there preserved. Copies of the pro- 
ceedings of every Legislature and every State convention, a record of the minutes 
of every important public gathering ever held in Kansas, are kept there. The walls 
and cases of this office are adorned with portraits of Governors of Kansas, of many 
other historial characters, and of the various Territorial and State Legislatures. 
Glass cases arranged about the rooms contain Kansas relics of all sorts, conveniently 
placed. In short, everything of an historical character is being gathered up and 
consigned to its proper place in the archives of this Society. 

"The value of our State Historical Society, aside from its general purposes, as 
the custodian of Kansas history, as an aid in litigation, can hardly be overestimated. 
A prominent attorney of this city a few years ago, in an important patent case, 
found himself compelled to establish a certain date and fact vital to his client. He 
searched high and low, far and near, without avail. At last it occurred to him that 
he might at least get a clue from the State Historical Society. He went to Topeka 
and was handed by the Secretary of the Society the public directory containing the 
very date and fact he needed. 

"The men who organized this Society builded better than they knew. Their 
efforts to maintain it through all these years have already been amply rewarded in 
the practical as well as sentimental benefit it has conferred upon the citizens of 
Kansas, and the appropriations made by the Legislature for its support have been 
among the best investments the State has ever made. Its utility will be more appre- 
ciated from year to year, and long after its projectors and present patrons have 
passed from the stage of action, its work and accumulations will abide among the 
most cherished possessions of the Kansans who are to be." 

THE WORK EXCEEDS THE MEANS. 

The law makes it the duty of the Society to catalog this library. This 
calls for consideration the subject of the long-continued embarrassment of 
the Society for want of adequate appropriations by the Legislature to carry 
on its work, a subject which has been repeatedly presented before in these 
reix)rts. The present very poorly paid clerical force is insufficient to prop- 
erly perform the current work of the Society, which has hitherto been 
necessarily confined to that of gathering in the accumulations, making a rec- 
ord of them, having them bound, classifying, and arranging them on the 
shelves, acknowledging gifts, and conducting the very extensive correspond- 
ence involved in reaching out for material, widely scattered as are the 
people who have for manifest causes had connection with the events of 
Kansas history from the earliest days. It has thus far been impossible to 
comply with the requirement to catalog the library. The meager appro- 
priations have compelled the payment to the clerks employed of less than 
one-half the amount" paid to employes in other departments of the State. 
Double the amount should be paid to present employes, and an additional 
force should be employed. The scanty provision made by the State to ena- 
ble the Society to perform its work has no precedent in the legislation of 
any State. While Kansas gives $4,250 to its Historical Society, Wisconsin 
has for many years given annually more than $9,000. 



Sixth biennial Report. 123 



LACK OF ROOM. 

The present embarrassment of the Society for lack of room for its collec- 
tions, and the urgent demand at this time that provision shall be made in 
the State Capitol when completed for the future needs of this library, must 
again be mentioned. 

The law, as has been quoted, has made it the duty of the Secretary of 
State to furnish convenient and suitable rooms for the library and collec- 
tions, such as the Board of Directors of the Society shall determine. Of 
course it has been thus far out of the power of the Secretary of State or 
any other authority to comply with this requirement in the uncompleted 
state of the Capitol building. But in view of the progress being made 
toward the completion of the Capitol, at the annual meeting two years ago, 
the Board presented the subject in its report to the Society, and, during the 
session of the Legislature following, a conference was held between the legis- 
lative committee of the Society and the joint committee of the Legislature 
on the State Library, to whom the Governor's recommendation, that proper 
legislation should be had for the maintenance of the work of the Society, 
had been referred. The committee of the Legislature responded to the 
wishes of our committee, and the following concurrent resolution was intro- 
duced by the committee in the House of Representatives, and was adopted: 

House Concubkent Resolution No. 22, 1887. — "jBe it resolved by the House of 
Representatives, the Senate concurring therein, That the State House Commissioners 
be, and they are hereby instructed, that in the preparation of the plan of the main 
building of the State House, and in the assignment of rooms, ample provision be 
made for the valuable collections of historical material of the State Historical 
Society, and for its future growth." 

When the resolution came before the Senate it failed to pass. A com- 
mittee has been appointed by the Board of Directors to confer with the 
Executive Council and the Legislature in relation to rooms for the library 
and collections of the Society in the Capitol when completed. 

SOCIETY'S SEAL. 

During last year, at the suggestion of President Wilder, an engraved seal 
for the Society's use, with a design deemed appropriate, was procured to be 
made in Washington, through the kind offices of Senator Plumb. The 
design combines the seal of the State of Kansas, with the coats of arms of 
France and Spain at the periods of the sovereignty of those powers over 
Louisiana Territory, of which the territory within the bounds of Kansas 
formed a part. 

ADDRESSES BEFORE THE SOCIETY. 

At the annual meeting, January 17, 1888, addresses were delivered by 
the following persons : 

Hon. D. W. Wilder delivered the annual address, briefly sketching the 



124 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



history of the Society. Other addresses were delivered upon subjects per- 
taining to Kansas history, as follows: 

Prof I. T. Goodnow, Manhattan, Personal Reminiscences, being an 
account of the founding of Manhattan by a New England Emigrant Aid 
party in 1855, of which party Prof Goodnow was the leader. 

Hon. S. A. Kingiuan, Topeka, on the Growth and Development of 
Kansas. 

Prof W. H. Carruth, Lawrence, on the subject of the Origin of Kansas 
Geographical Names. 

C. A. Hiller, Esq., Salina, on the Padouacas, and other Aboriginal Tribes 
of Kansas. 

C. F. Scott, lola, on the subject of the Pioneer Press of Kansas. 

Hon. H. N. Lester, Syracuse, on the Colonization of the Upper Arkansas 
Valley in Kansas. 

Hon. J. Ware Butterfield, Florence, on the subject of the Kansas Histor- 
ical Society, the character of its work, and the importance of maintaining it. 

Columbus Borin, of Oberlin, on Kansas, her History, her History-mak- 
ei-s, and her Historical Society. 

Hon. James F. Legate, Leavenworth, on the Pioneers of Kansas, refer- 
ring particularly to the services of Joel K. Goodin, Samuel C. Pomeroy, 
John Brown, and some others. 

Noble L. Prentis, Newton, on the subject of the Swedish, Bohemian, Irish, 
and other colonies of foreigners in Kansas. 

Historical papers were prepared and presented to the meeting by persons 
who were not present, as follows: 

John P. Jones, of Coldwater, on the subject of the alleged Exploration of 
Lieut. Du Tisne, in 1719, of the country of the Osages, Pawnees and Pa- 
douacas. 

J. S. Painter, of Garden City, on Southwestern Kansas, its settlement, 
development, and transformation. 

Prof C. A. Swensson, of Lindsborg, on the History of the Swedish Amer- 
ican settlements in Kansas. 

Printed or manuscript copies of most of these addresses and papers are in 
the files of the Society, and should form a part of a volume of collections 
which should be published at an early day. 

TERM OF OFFICE OF PRESIDENT. 

At the annual meeting in January, 1888, Hon. D. W. Wilder, having held 
the office of President for one year, resigned the position, and Hon. Edward 
Russell of Lawrence was elected in his stead for the unexpired term of one 
year. This was done in pursuance of the suggestion made by Gen. Wilder 
and approved by a vote of the Board of Directors, that it would be better 
for the interests of the Society that the term of the office of President should 
be but for one year, instead of two years as provided in the constitution. 



Sixth Biennial Re poet. 125 

An amendment of the constitution for this object has been proposed and 
placed in the minutes of the Society for consideration at the annual meeting 
in 1889. It is in the following words: 

"The elective officers of the Society shall consist of a President and two Vice- 
Presidents, who shall hold their offices for the term of one year, and until their suc- 
cessors shall be chosen; a Secretary and a Treasurer, who shall hold their offices for 
the term of two years, and until their successors shall be chosen; said officers to be 
chosen by the Board of Directors from their members, their election to be made at 
the first meeting of the Board subsequent to the annual meeting of the Society, and 
their terms of office shall begin at the date of their election and qualification in 
office." 

At this meeting, also, Hon. William A. Phillips, of Salina, was elected 
one of the Vice-Presidents, in the place of Hon. Henry H. Williams, who has 
removed from the State. 

FINANCES, 1887. 

The finances of the Society for the year ending January 17, 1888, includ- 
ing the Treasurer's account of receipts and expenditures and the expendi- 
tures from the appropriations made by the Legislature, as shown at the 
annual meeting, 1888, were as follows: 

EECEIPTS. 

1887. 

Jan. 18, Appropriations to June 30, 1887 $1,135 39 

" 18, 'Balance in hands of Treasurer of Society, fees 3 20 

" 18, Balance of miscellaneous appropriation 322 62 

July 1, Appropriation to June 30, 1888 4,250 GO 

Receipts from membership fees 54 00 

Total |5,765 21 

EXPENDITUBE8. 

Salaries and clerk hire from general appropriations $2,447 55 

Clerk hire from miscellaneous appropriations 322 62 

Clerk hire from membership receipts 14 40 

Purchase of books 653 78 

►Postage, freight and contingent 485 73 3,924 08 

Balance $1,841 13 

FINANCES, 1888. 

The finances for the period commencing January 18, and ending Novem- 
ber 20th, 1888, are as follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

1888. 
Jan. 17, Balance of appropriation to June 30, 1888 $1,79 ^ 33 

" 17, Balance in hands of Treasurer of Society, fees 42 80 

July 1, Appropriation to June 30, 1889 4,250 00 

Receipts from membership fees 54 00 

Total $6,145 13 



126 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



Forward, total receipts $6,145 13 

EXPENDITUBES. 

Salaries and clerk hire $2,500 00 

Purchase of books ^^'^ ^^ 

Postage, freight and contingent 206 47 

Expenditures from membership fees 64 80 3,516 38 

Balance $2,628 75 

PRINCIPAL LIBRARY ACCESSIONS. 

The following classified lists show the principal accessions of books and 
pamphlets to the library during the period covered by the report: 

Bibliography and Journalism. — Indexes to 16vols. New York Daily 
Tribune; Clarke's Globe Dictionary of the English Language; Publishers' 
Trade-List Annual, 1888; Bulletins of the Library Company of Philadel- 
phia; Hammett's Bibliography of Newport, Rhode Island; Proceedings of 
the Mississippi Press Association, 1885-6; Norton's History of the Texas 
Press; Perrin's Pioneer Press of Kentucky; English Catalogue of Books 
for 1887; Annual American Catalogue, 1887; Poole's Index to Periodical 
Literature; Continuous Index to Periodicals; Prof. M. M. Campbell's Pub- 
lications on the Improvement of the English Alphabet, 5 pamphlets ; 
Knudsen's Si)elling Reform Publications, 3; Gibson's Bibliography of 
Short-hand ; Sampson's History of Advertising; Bates's Advertiser's Handy 
Guide; Bates's Advertiser's Guide Book, 1888; Alden's American Newspa- 
per Catalogue, 1886; Ro well's American Newspaper Directories, 7 vols.; 
Ayer's Newspaper Annual, 1886, 1887. 

Religion, Temperance, Mormonism. — Walsh's Echoes of Bible His- 
tory; Reports of American Sunday School Union; The Policy of the M. E. 
Church, 1842; Kerr's People's History of Presbyterianism; Pingree and 
Rice's Debate on the Doctrine of Univereal Salvation; Bradlee's Sermons 
for All Sects; Mayo's Graces and Powers of the Christian Life; History 
of the American Missionary Association; Adams's Bohemian Work in 
Chicago; The West Church, Boston, Commemorative Services, 1887; 
Cooke's History of the Clapboard Trees Parish, Dedham, Mass.; Kidder's 
Mormons, 1852; Gunnison's Mormons or Latter Day Saints; Hyde's Mor- 
monism, Its Leaders and Designs; Annual Report Kansas Y. M. C. A., 
1888; Historical Sketch of the First Presbyterian Church of Lawrence, 
Kansas, 1888; Kansas Baptist Annual, 1886; Clubb's Maine Liquor Law 
and Life of Neal Dow; Proceedings of the United Grand Commandery 
Knights Templar, 1886; Armstrong's Temperance Reformation. 

United States Public Documents. — Congressional Documents, 172 
vols.; Presidents' Messages and Documents, 1873-1882, 13 vols.; Reports 
of the Secretary of U. S. Treasury; Annual Report U. S. Commissioner of 
Pensions, 1888; Report of the U. S. Commissioner of Patents, 1884; Statis- 
tics of the United States Domestic Commerce of 1863; Nimmo's Internal 



Sixth biennial Be fob t. 127 



Commerce of the United States; Nimmo's Commerce and Navigation; Re- 
ports, Commerce and Navigation of the United States, 6 vols. ; Commercial 
Relations of the United States, 1862; Index to U. S. Consular Reports; 
Statistics and Preliminary Reports of the U. S. Census, 1860; Reports of 
the Director of U. S. Mint, 7 vols. ; Proceedings of National Prison Reform 
Congress ; Proceedings of the U. S. Conference of Charities and Corrections ; 
Report of the U. S. Commissioner of Labor, 1887; Proceedings of the 
National Convention of Bureaus of Statistics and Labor, 4 vols.; Bul- 
letins of U. S. Fish Commissioner, 1881-4; Bulletins of U. S. Commis- 
sioner of Fisheries, vols. 2, 3 and 4; Annual Report of the U. S. Com- 
missioner of Fish and Fisheries; Goode's Fisheries and Fish Industries of 
the United States ; Bulletins and Proceedings of the U. S. National Museum, 
11 vols.; Report of U. S. Chief Signal Officer, 1887; Report of the U. S. 
Chief Signal Office ; Reports of the Chief Signal Officer of the United States, 
4 vols.; Annual Reports of the U. S. Light House Board, 1886 and 1887, 
2 vols. ; U. S. Life-Saving Service Report; Annual Reports and Maps of 
the U. S. Coast Survey, 5 vols. ; U. S. Official Postal Guide ; Annual Report 
of the U. S. Superintendent of Public Documents. 

State Documents. — Reports of Illinois Railroad and Warehouse Com- 
missioners; Reports of Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and New York 
Railroad Commissioners ; Reports of Iowa State Veterinary Surgeon ; Reports 
Iowa State Library, 9 vols.; Census of the State of New York, 1875; Year 
Book of Charleston, South Carolina, 1887; Report of the Massachusetts 
Board of Lunacy and Charity, 1887; Reports of Ohio Meteorological Bu- 
reau; Bulletins Nebraska and Missouri Weather Service; Annual Reports 
of the Governors of Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Washington, and Wyo- 
ming Territories; Publications of Montana Territory, 16 vols.; Reports of 
the Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan and Wisconsin State Boards of Health ; 
Reports of the New Jersey and New York Bureaus of Statistics of Labor ; 
Michigan Registration of Vital Statistics, 1872; Ohio State Statistical Re- 
port ; Reports of Indiana Department of Statistics. 

Politics, Political Economy. — Journal of Debates in the Massachu- 
setts Convention, 1820-21 ; Discussions on the Massachusetts Constitution 
of 1853; Pamphlets on the Constitution of the United States; Stan wood's 
History of Presidential Elections; Bartlett's Presidential Candidates, 1860; 
Henry's Messages of President Buchanan; Benton's Thirty Years' View; 
Works of William H. Seward, 5 vols.; Mill's Essay on Liberty ; McPher- 
son's Hand-Book of Politics, 1868, 1872, 1880, 1888 r Proceedings in the 
Cases of the Impeachment of Kansas State Officers, 1862 ; Trumbull's 
American Lesson of the Free Trade Struggle in England ; Lieb's Protec- 
tive Tariff; Peffer's Tariff Manual; Oglesby's Usury; Prohibition Party 
Campaign Documents, 1886, 1888; The Knight's Book, the Principles and 
Aims of the Knights of Labor; Gunton's Wealth and Progress ; Kellogg's 
Labor and Capital; Smith's Hard Times, Suggestions to Workers and Hints 



128 STATE Historical Society, 



to the Rich ; Jacobson's Hints Toward Settling the Labor Troubles ; Fore- 
man's Big Wages and How to Earn Them ; Gilmore's Republican Cam- 
paign Songs, 1888 ; Colton's Labor Songs ; Ingalls' Social Wealth ; Norcross' 
History of Democracy ; Lumry's National Suicide and Its Prevention ; 
Parsons' Rights of a Citizen of the United States ; Quarantine Laws of 
the United States ; Eudicott's Immigration Laws of the United States, 
State and National ; CuUin's China in America; Dillon's Oddities of Colo- 
nial Legislation; Chapman's Right and Wrong in Massachusetts; Hale's 
How They Lived in Hampton ; Woman Suffrage in Kansas ; Reynolds's His- 
tory of the Grand Lodge of Illinois; Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of 
Kansas, 1870-1875; Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Kansas, 
1886-8; Proceedings of the Grand Commandery of Kansas, 1868-1885; 
Proceedings of the Grand Chapter of Kansas, 1866-1874. 

Slavery. — Elliot's Bible and Slavery; Clarkson's Essay on Slavery; 
Alcot's African Colonization ; Channing's West India Emancipation ; The 
Boston Slave Riot and Trial of Anthony Burns ; The Abolitionist, 1833 ; 
Stearns's Notes on Uncle Tom's Cabin; Jones's Negro Myths from the 
Georgia Coast; Cable's The Negro Question. 

Finance. — Financial History of the United States from 1774 to 1885, 
3 vols.; Knox's History of the Issues of United States Paper Money ; 
Baker's, The Subject of Money ; Report of the Silver Commission of the 
United States, 1876 ; Dye's Coin Encyclopedia. 

Military and Naval. — Scott's General Regulations for the U. S. Army, 
1821; U. S. Army Regulations, 1881; Hamersly's Army and Navy Regis- 
ter, 1776-1887; Hamersly's Army Register, U. S., for one hundred years, 
1779-1879; Official Army Registers of the United States, 1887, 1888; 
Scribner's Navy in the Civil War, 3 vols.; Reports Chief of Engineers, 
U. S. Army; Report of the Chief of Ordnance, U. S. A., 1886; Report of 
the Secretary of U. S. Navy, 2 vols., 1885 and 1886; Congressional Report 
on Ordnance and War Ships; War Series, Information from Abroad ; Naval 
Resources, Information from Abroad; Chadwick's Training of Seamen in 
England and France; Soley's Foreign Systems of Naval Education; Iowa 
Adjutant General's Report, 8 vols.; Report of the Adjutant General of 
Pennsylvania, 1866. 

Education. — Kiddle & Schem's Cyclopaedia of Education; Painter's 
History of Education; Low & Pulling's History of English Education 
Rosenkranz's Philosophy of Education ; Preyer's The Mind of the Child 
Froebel's Education of Man ; Lancaster Improvements in Education, 1807 
Baldwin's Elementary Psychology and Education; White's European 
Schools of History and Politics ; Laurie's Rise and Early Constitution of 
Universities; Adams's Study of History in American Colleges and Univer- 
sities; Record of the Commemoration of the 250th Anniversary of Harvard 
University; Bowditch's History of Yale University; Hough's Historical 
and Statistical Sketch of the University of the State of New York ; Alex- 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 129 



ander's Biographical Sketches of the Founders and Alumni of Log College, 
Pa. ; Smith's History of Jefferson College, Penn. ; Historical Sketch of the 
Boston Latin School; Foster's Alumni Oxonienses: The Members of the 
University of Oxford, England, from 1715 to 1886; Schoenhof's Technical 
Education in Europe; Catalogs of the Chicago Manual Training School; 
Publications of the American Industrial Education Association ; Love's 
Industrial Education; Workman's Element's of Geography, 1814; Geike's 
Teaching of Geography; Hinman's Eclectic Physical Geography; Morri- 
son's Ventilation and Warming of School Buildings; Fish's Guide to the 
Conduct of Meetings; Jenkins's Short-hand Instructor and Dictator; Re- 
ports of the U. S. Commissioner of Education, 1870, 1883-4, 1885-6; Pro- 
ceedings of the Trustees of the Peabody Education Funds, vol. 3, 1881- 
1887; Report, Chicago Schools, 1887; Thirteen Reports Illinois Industrial 
University; Reports of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of Michi- 
gan, 10 vols. 

Science. — Silliman's American Journal of Science and Arts, 36 numbers ; 
The American Journal of Science, 1818; Woodward's Modern Philosophical 
Conceptions of Life; Good's Book of Nature; Annual Report Smithsonian 
Institution, 1849, 1884, 1885; Miscellaneous Publications of same, 9 vols.; 
Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, vols. 28 to 33 ; Smithsonian Contribu- 
tions to Knowledge, 6 vols.; Reports of the American Philosophical Society ; 
Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 1887; Proceedings of the 
American Philosophical Society, vol. 25,1888; Proceedings of the Philadel- 
phia Academy of Natural Sciences, 1888 ; Bulletins of the Washington Philo- 
sophical Society ; Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science ; Journal of 
the Cincinnati Society of Natural History ; Proceedings of the Cincinnati So- 
ciety of Natural History, 1887; Essex Institute Bulletins, 18 vols., 1869- 
1886; Annales de Society des Sciences Naturelles, La Rochelle, France, 1886 ; 
Bulletin de Societe des Sciences, Lettres et Arts, De Pau, France, 1885 to 
1887, 2 vols.; Memoires de 1' Academic de Sciences et Belles Lettres, de 
Dijon, France, vol. 9, 1887; American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac, 
1888; Proctor's Half- Hours With the Stars; Atkinson's Elements of Elec- 
tric Lighting ; Blodget's Climatology of the United States ; Dawson's Geo- 
logical History of Plants; Kellerman's Analytical Flora of Kansas, 1888; 
Hall's Catalogue of the Unionidse of the Mississippi Valley; Keep's West 
Coast Shells; Allen's History of the American Bison; Patton's Natural 
Resources of the United States ; Mineral Resources of the United States, 
1867; Raymond's Mineral Resources West of the Rocky Mountains, 1877; 
Report of the Director of the U. S. Mint on Precious Metals, 1884; Annual 
Reports of the California State Mineralogist, 1885, '86, and '87; Reports of 
the Colorado State School of Mines, 1885-1887; De la Beche's Geological 
Manual; Hull's Geological History; Reports of U. S. Geological Survey; 
Emmons's Geology and Mining Industry of Leadville, Colo.; Emmons's 
Atlas of the Geology of Leadville; Worthen's Illinois Geological Report,, 



130 State Histobical society. 



1875; Lyon, Cox and Lesquereux's Kentucky Geological Report, 1851; 
Owen's Kentucky Geological Report, 1858-9 ; Jackson's Maine Geological 
Report, 1837, 5 vols.; Jackson's Maine Geological Report, 1839; Broad- 
head, Meek & Shumard's Geological Report of Missouri, 1855-1871 ; Pum- 
pelly's Missouri Geological Report, 1872; Shumard & Swallow's New 
Fossils from Missouri and Kansas ; Swallow's Geology of the Southwest 
Branch of the Missouri Pacific Railroad; Leidy's Ancient Fauna of Ne- 
braska, 1853; Geological History of Lake Lahontan, Nevada; Ohio Geo- 
logical Reports, 6 vols., and maps; Rogers's Pennsylvania Geological 
Report, vols. 1 and 2, 1858; White's Pennsylvania Geological Report, 1878; 
Lesquereux's Atlas to the Coal Flora of Pennsylvania, 1879; Lesquereux's 
Text to accompany the same, 1880; Buckley's Reports of the Geological 
and Agricultural Survey of Texas, 1874, 1876; Dutton's Tertiary History 
of the Grand Caiion District, with atlas; Hager's Vermont Geological 
Reports, 1861; Whitfield's Paleontology of the Black Hills; Jenney's 
Mineral Wealth, etc., of the Black Hills, 1876; Billing's Canada Geolog- 
ical Report, 1861-5; Browne's Boston and New England Medical Register, 
4 vols.; Stimson's History of Express Companies and Railroads; Wood's 
I*ractical Treatise on Railroads, 1832; Poor's Directory of Railroads, 1886. 

ARCU.KOLO(iY AND ETHNOLOGY. — Rcports of the Pcabody Museum of 
American Archieology and Ethnology ; Baldwin's Ancient America ; Read's 
Archeology of Ohio; Griffing's Archaeological Chart of Manhattan and 
Vicinity; Biichner's Man in the Past, Present and Future; Thurston's 
Mound Builders; Report of the U. S. Bureau of Ethnology, 1881-1882; 
Cushing's Zuni Bread StuflT. 

Agriculture, Horticulture and Forestry. — Reports of Statistician 
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 14 vols.; Botanical Division U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, Bulletin Nos. 2, 3, 5 and 6 ; IT. S. Department 
of Agriculture, 2d Report Bureau of Animal Industry, 1885; Annual Re- 
port U. S. Commissioner of Agriculture, 1887; Division of Entomology, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bulletin No. 19 ; Division of Entomology, 
IT. S. Department of Agriculture, Periodical Bulletins, vol. 1, Nos. 1, 2 and 
3; Chemical Division, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bulletins Nos. 2, 
3, 6, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18; Ohio State Forestry Review, 1886; Con- 
sular Reports on the Forestry of Europe; U. S. Agricultural Department's 
Report of Forestry Conditions of the Rocky Mountains; Proceedings of the 
Annual Conventions of American Florists, 1886-7; Alkali Lands, Irrigation 
and Drainage in California; Report of the Alabama Commissioner of Agri- 
culture, 1888; Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 
1887; Report of the Michigan State Pomological Society, 1878; Transac- 
tions of the Michigan State Agricultural Society, 14 years; Bulletins 
34-38, Michigan Agricultural Farm Department; Reports of the Michigan 
^tate Board of Agriculture for 11 years; Proceedings of the Mississippi 
Horticultural Society, 1883; Twelve Bulletins of the Missouri State Agri- 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 131 



cultural College; Ohio Agricultural Reports, 12 vols.; Report of the Com- 
missioner of Agriculture of South Carolina, 1886; Tennessee Agricultural 
and Geological Map, 1888; Meraoires Publier Par La Soci^te Nationale 
d' Agriculture de France, 1888; Real's Grasses of North America; Brisbin's 
Beef Bonanza, or How to Get Rich on the Plains; Brisbin's Trees and Tree 
Planting ; Food and Food Adulterants, Wiley, Richardson and Crarapton ; 
U. S. Bulletin of Sugar-Producing Plants; Bulletins of the Connecticut 
Cornell University, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, 
Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Stations. 

Literature and Miscellany. — Gov. John A. Martin's Addresses 
Delivered' in Kansas; PefTer's Geroldine; or, What May Happen; Mrs. 
Hudson's Esther, The Gentile; Picard's Old Boniface; Peacock's Poems of 
the Plains, and Songs of the Solitudes; John P. Campbell's Poetical Works, 
Queen Sylvia and Other Poems, The Summerless Sea and Other Poems, 
and Merle of Medevon and other Prose Writings, 4 vols, in all; Jos. 
E. Badger's Stories and Tales of the West ; Poems of Celeste May ; Bart- 
lett's Familiar Quotations; Hitchcock's Poetical Dictionary; Frey's Sobri- 
quets and Nicknames; R.W.Emerson's Miscellanies; Hale's Books That 
Have Helped Me; Higginson's Hints on Writing and Speechmaking; 
Fiske's Mirror Annual and Directory of Theaters for 1888; William Wirt's 
Letters of the British Spy; Keim's Society in Washington; The Columbian 
Orator; Thompson's Seasons; Coates Kinney's Lyrics; W. M. Paxton's 
Poems; Poems of Phillis Wheatley; Humphrey's Miscellaneous Works. 

History, Geography, Descriptive, Travels. — Memoires Societe His- 
torique, Litteraire, Artistique et Scientifique du Cher., vol. 3, 1887; Bul- 
letin de la Society Nationale des Antiquaries de France, 1885 and 1886, 2 
vols.; Archives do Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro, vol. 7, 1887; Pro- 
ceedings Canadian Institute, 1888; Proceedings New Hampshire Historical 
Society, 1884-8; Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
1884-6 ; Massachusetts Historical Society Collections, vol. 2, sixth series : 
"Sewall's Letter-book"; Essex Institute Historical Collections, 28 vols., 
1859-1886; Proceedings Bunker Hill Monument Association, 1888; Pro- 
ceedings of the Rhode Island Historical Society, 1887-8; New York 
Historical Society Collections, 9 vols. ; Publications of the Buffalo, New 
York, Historical Society, vols. 1 and 2 ; Proceedings of the New Jersey 
Historical Society; Southern Historical Society, vol. 15, 1887; Collections 
of the Virginia Historical Society, vol. 7, 1888; Georgia Historical Col- 
lections, 2 vols., 1840-2; Publications of the Western Reserve and 
Northern Ohio Historical Society, 7 vols. ; Catalogue of the Minnesota His- 
torical Society; Transactions of the Nebraska State Historical Society; 
Contibutions to the Historical Society of Montana, 1876; Papers of the Cal- 
iforia Historical Society; Rawlinson's Ancient History; Stoke's Mediaeval 
History; Patton's Modern History; Prescott's Encyclopedia of History, 



132 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Biography and Travel; Murray's Encyclopedia of Geography; Morlitz's 
Travels in England in 1782; Atkinson's Oriental and Western Siberia; 
Margry, Meraoires et Documents, Origines Francaises des Pays d'Outre- 
Mer, 1679-1754, 6 vols.; Historical Writings of Francis Parkman,7 vols.; 
Kingsford's History of Canada, 1679-1725; Bryce's Short History of 
the Canadian People; Bryce's Old Settlers of the Red River, Canada; 
Bryce's Holiday Rambles Between Winnipeg and Victoria; Bryce's 
Manitoba, Its Infancy, Growth and Present Condition; Sullivan and 
Blake's Mexico, Picturesque, Political and Progressive, 1888; Hamil 
ton's Mexican Handbook; Solis's History of the Conquest of Mexico 
by the Spaniards; Prescott's Conquest of Mexico, 3 vols.; Chevalier's 
Mexico, Ancient and Modern ; Ruxton's Adventures in Mexico and the Rocky 
Mountains, 1846-7; Barrister's Trip to Mexico, 1849-50; Cubas' Republic 
of Mexico in 1876; Wilson's Mexico and Its Religion; Curtis's Capitals of 
Spanish America; Squier's Nicaragua, Its People, Scenery and the Pro- 
posed Oceanic Canal, 1852, 2 vols.; Stout's Nicaragua; Account of Mi- 
randa's Expedition ; Pumpelly's Across America and Asia and Around the 
World; Jenkins's Exploring Expeditions of Wilkes d'Urville, Ross and 
Lynch; Nourse's American Explorations in the Ice Zone; International 
Polar Expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska, during the years 1881-1883, by 
Lieut. P. H. Ray; Schley's Greely Relief Expedition, 1884; Joel Barlow's 
Vision of Columbus; Bancroft's History of the United States, vols. 4-6; 
Winsor's Narrative and Critical History of the United States, 2 vols.; 
Henry's Normal History of the United States; Chevalier's Society in 
United States; Carnegie's Triumphant Democracy, or Fifty Years' March 
of the Republic; Pearse's History of Iron Manufacture in the American 
Colonies; Mellen's Book of the United States, 1836; Colerick's Adventures 
of Pioneer Children ; Abbott's Blue Jackets of '76, Naval Battles of the 
Revolution; Conover's Journals of Sullivan's Expedition; Mrs. Grant's 
Memoirs of an American Lady; Baxter's British Invasion from the North, 
Campaigns of Carleton and Burgoyne, with Digby's Journal; Brown's 
Views of the Campaigns of the Northwestern Army, 1815; Cutts's Conquest 
of California and New Mexico; Tour to Northern Mexico with Doniphan's 
Expedition, 1846 and 1847, Wislizenus ; Melish's Travels in the United 
States in 1806-11 ; Mitchell's Traveler's Guide Through the United States, 
1833; Hodgson's Journey Through North America; Pope's Tour of the 
United States; Loskiel's Journey from Bethlehem, Penn., to Goshen, 
Ohio, in 1803; Dixon's Tour Through the United States and Canada; 
Barneby's Life and Labors in the Far West; Steele's Overland Guide, 
1888; Gleed's Overland Guide; Clemens' Life on the Mississippi; For- 
man's Narrative of a Journey Down the Ohio and Mississippi, 1789-90; 
Whymper's Travel and Adventure in the Territory of Alaska; Emory's 
Mexican Boundary Survey, 2 vols., 1857-8; Reports of the Mexican Bor- 
der Commission, 1875; McClure's Three Thousand Miles Through the 



Sixth Biennial Re poet. i33 



Kocky MountaiDs; Cox's Adventures on the Columbia River; Sitgreaves' 
Expedition Down the Zuni and Colorado Rivers, 1854; Stansbury's Ex- 
ploration of Utah; W. Hepworth Dixon's White Conquest; Palmer's 
Rocky Mountain Travels ; Perkins' Check List for American Local His- 
tory; Barber's History and Antiquities of New England, 1841; Stearns's 
History of Rindge, N, H. ; Goodwin's Pilgrim Republic, Colony of New 
Plymouth; Stearns's History of Ashburnham, Mass.; Bates' Records of the 
Town of Braintree, Mass.; Celebration of the 250th Anniversary of Ded- 
ham, Mass.; Lewis's History of Linn, Mass.; Green's History of Spring- 
field, Mass. ; Mason's History of the Town and City of Springfield, Mass., 
1636-1886; Winchester, Massachusetts, Historical Record; Providence 
Plantations for 250 Years, 1636 to 1886 ; Atwater's History of New Haven ; 
Brooks's Story of New York; Clute's Annals of Staten Island, N. Y. ; 
Broadhead's Towns along the Mohawk River from 1630-1634; Hough's 
History of Jefferson County, New^ York ; Hotchkins's History of the Settle- 
ment of Western New York; Hawes's Buffalo Fifty Years Ago; Evert's 
History of Monroe County, New York; Parker's Rochester, New York, a 
Historical Story; Cornell's History of Pennsylvania; Howe's Historical 
•Collections of New Jersey; Shaw's History of Essex and Hudson Coun- 
ties, N. J.; Clay's Annals of the Swedes on the Delaware; Minutes of the 
Council of the State of Delaware, 1776-1792; McSherry's History of 
Maryland, 1634-1848; Polk's Hand-Book of North Carolina, 1879; Car- 
roll's South Carolina, 1836; Year Book of Charleston, South Carolina, 
1886; White's Historical Collections of Georgia; Meek's Romantic Pas- 
sages in Southwestern History; Duane's Account of Louisiana, 1803; 
Stiff's Texas Emigrant; Smith's Reminiscences of the Texas Republic; 
McCalla's Adventures in Texas, 1840; Parker's Expedition of Captain 
Marcy Through Texas in 1854; Parker's Notes of Marcy's Expedition 
Through Texas in 1854; Phelan's History of Tennessee; Andrews' Admis- 
sion of Kentucky, Tennessee and Ohio Into the Union ; Historical Writings 
•of Orasmus H. Marshall, in Relation to the West; Hale's Trans-AUeghany 
Pioneers; Gilmore's Advance Guard of Western Civilization; Hall's 
Legends of the West ; The Old Northwest, Hinsdale ; Drake's Making of 
the Great West; Mitchener's Ohio Annals, Historic Events in the Tuscara- 
was and Muskingum Valleys; Graham's History of Coshocton County^ 
Ohio; Venable's Foot-Prints of the Pioneers in the Ohio Valley; Rickoff's 
Ohio, a Centennial Poem; History of Wayne County, Ohio; Norton's His- 
tory of Knox County, Ohio; Alderman's Centennial Souvenir of Marietta, 
Ohio ; Perrin's History of Stark County, Ohio ; Black's Story of Ohio ; 
Walker's History of Athens County, Ohio ; Graham's History of Richland 
Oounty, Ohio ; Beers's History of Clark County, Ohio ; Goodrich & Tuttle's 
Illustrated History of Indiana ; Sheahan & Upton's Great Conflagration in 
Chicago; Reynolds' Pioneer History of Illinois; Blois' Gazetteer of Michi- 



134 State Histobical Society, 



gan, 1839 ; History of Dane County, Wisconsin ; Seymour's Sketches of 
Minnesota, with a map, 1850; Belton's Annals of St. Louis, Under the 
French and Spanish Domination; History of Vernon County, Missouri; 
History of Clay and Platte Counties, Missouri; McNamara's Three Year& 
on the Kansas Border; W. W. Sargent's Holton, the County Seat of Jack- 
son County, Kansas, 1888; Savage's Visit to Nebraska, 1842; Scidmore'a 
Alaska; Priest's American Antiquities and Discoveries in the West; Buf- 
falo Bill, His Wild West Show; McChvng's Sketches of Western Adven- 
ture; Mrs. Custer's Tenting on the Plains, or General Custer in Kansa* 
and Texas ; Exploration for a Railroad Route from the Mississippi River 
to the Pacific Ocean, 1860; Dixon's New America; Bancroft's Pacific 
States Histories, 27 vols.; Marryat's Mountains and Mole Hills, California; 
Widney's California of the South; Nicolay's Oregon Territory, 1846; 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co.'s American Commonwealths, 9 vols.; Koster'» 
Travels in Brazil, 1817; Kidder's Sketches of Residence and Travels in 
Brazil, 1845; Herndon's Exploration of the Valley of the Amazon, with 
atlas, 1854; King's Twenty-four Years in the Argentine Republic; Antonio 
dc Ulloa's Noticias Americanos (Central and North), Madrid, 1792. 

Gazetteers, Directories, Almanacs. — lire's Dictionary of Arts,. 
Manufactures of Mines, 2 vols.; Morse's American Gazetteer, 1797; Cen- 
tennial Gazetteer of the United States, 1876 ; Zell's Business Directory, 1886 ; 
Ames's Almanac for 1765; Whig 'Almanac, N. Y., 1847-54, and Tribune 
Almanac, 1856-87, 14 years; American Almanac, 15 years, completing set 
from 1830; Brown's Western Gazetteer, 1817; Boston Municipal Register, 
1861 ; Dickman's Kansas Medical Directory, 1881 ; Elk County Directory,. 
1888; Radges's Topeka City Directory, 1888-9. 

Maps, Atlases, Charts. — Mitchell's New General Atlas; Labberton's 
Historical Atlas and General History ; Historical Map of the United States ,- 
Monthly Pilot Charts of the North Atlantic Ocean ; Map of the Great Central 
Route betw^n the Atlantic and Mississippi, 1854 ; Maps of the Yellowstone 
Country ; Andreas' Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa; Rand, 
McNally & Co.'s Maps, (see list of map donations) ; Map of the Platte 
Country, Missouri, 1854 ; Meacham's Illustrated Atlas of Brown and Nemaha 
Counties, Kansas; Eleven Maps of Kansas and parts of Kansas. (See list 
of donors of maps, atlases, and charts.) 

Biography. — Morley's English Writers; Groser's Men Worth Imitating; 
Simmons's Men of Mark ; Victor's Life and Events; Angell's Autobiograph- 
ical Sketches; Appleton's Cyclopsedia of American Biography, 5 vols.; 
American Men of Letters, 10 vols.; Houghton, Mifflin & Co.'s American 
Statesmen, 18 vols.; Miller's Bench and Bar of Georgia; Lynch's Bench 
and Bar of Mississippi ; Everett's Address on Charles Francis Adams; Life 
of P. T. Barnum; Biography of Rev. Henry Ward Beecher; Knox's Life 



Sixth Biennial Report. 136 

and Work of Henry Ward Beecher; Rosevelt's Life of Thomas Hart 
Benton; Hayden's Biographical Sketch of Oliver Brown; Curtis's Life 
of James Buchanan, 2 vols.; Hensel and Parker's Lives of Cleveland 
and Thurman; Life, Journals and Correspondence of Rev. Manasseh 
Cutler, 2 vols.; DeLesseps' Recollections of Forty Years; Life and Times 
of Frederick Douglass; Mansfield's Memoirs of Daniel Drake, and of 
the Early Settlement of Cincinnati; Biographical Sketch of Lyman C. 
Draper and M. M. Jackson ; Hayden's Gen. Roger Enos, of Arnold's 
Expedition to Canada, 1775; Life of John B. Finch; McMaster's Benjamin 
Franklin as a Man of Letters; Memoirs of John C. Fremont; Hale's 
Franklin in France, parts 1 and 2; Austin's Life of Elbridge Gerrv ; 
Greeley's Recollections of a Busy Life; Reminiscences of General W. S. 
Hancock ; Taylor's Memoirs of Joseph Henry ; Jackson's Life of William 
Henry Harrison; Grigg and Elliot's Life of General William H. Harrison; 
Wallace and Townsend's Lives of Harrison and Morton ; Danvers's Thomas 
Jefferson; Life of Amos A. Lawrence; Arnold's Life of Abraham Lincoln; 
Rice's Reminiscences of Abraham Lincoln ; Wells's Lincoln and Seward ; 
Dawson's Life and Services of Gen. John A. Logan; Rudd and Carleton's 
Life and Writings of Gen. Nathaniel Lyon; Woodward's Life of Gen. 
Nathaniel Lyon; Adams's Lives of Madison and Monroe; Magruder's 
Biography of John Marshall; Weems's Life of William Penn; Jenkins's 
President Polk and His Administration ; Reminiscences of Ben: Perley Poore ; 
Memoirs, Correspondence and Reminiscences of William Renick ; Diary of 
Thomas Robbins; Life of Emery A. Stdrrs; Harsha's Life of Charles 
Sumner; Byrce's Biographical Sketch of John Tanner; Life and Writings 
of Grant Thorburn ; Autobiography of Lorenzo Waugh, 4th edition ; Hall's 
Life of George Washington ; Lossing's Home of Washington ; Autobiography 
of Thurlow Weed; Memoirs of Thurlow Weed; Hayden's Weitzel Me- 
morial. 

Genealogy. — Burke's General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland 
and Wales, 1883; Savage's Genealogical Dictionary, 4 vols.; New England 
Historic Genealogical Society Proceedings ; Hughes' American Ancestry ; 
Munsell's American Ancestry; Rupp's thirty thousand names of German, 
Swiss, Dutch, French and other Immigrants in Pennsylvania; Austin's 
Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island; Dedham, Massachusetts, Record 
of Marriages, Births and Deaths, 1635-1845; Genealogy of the Family of 
Ralph Earle; Genealogy of the Family of George Marsh, of Hingham, 
Mass., by E. J. Marsh ; The Genealogy of John Marsh, of Salem, Mass. ; 
Genealogy of the Perrin Family; Hayden's Pollock's Descendents. 

Indians. — Cleveland's Lost Tribes; Lake Mohonk Conference of the 
friends of 'the Indians, 1887; Helen Jackson's Century of Dishonor; Bar- 
row's The Indians' Side of the Indian Question ; Harrison's Studies on Indian 
Reservations; Life of John Eliot, The Apostle to the Indians; Jacobs's No- 



L 



136 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 

nantum and Natick.Mass.; Ojibway New Testament, 1844; Powell's Intro- 
duction to the Study of Indian Languages; Hayden's Silver and Copper 
Indian Medals; Compiled Laws of the Cherokee Nation, from 1839-1875; 
Blackbird's History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians; Lang and Tay- 
lor's Visit to Indians West of the Mississippi, 1843 ; Newsom's Scenes Among 
the Indians, and Custer's Last Fight; Johnston's Capture by the Indians in 
1790; Col. James Smith's Captivity with the Indians, 1755-9; Jewett's Cap- 
tivity among the Savages of Nootka Sound, 1815 ; Pattie's Narrative, Timothy 
Flint; Seaver's Life of Mary Jemison ; Foster's Sequoyah ; Mrs. Eastman's 
Dahcotah, or Life and Legends of the Sioux; Brisbin's Belden, The White 
Chief. 

Rebellion. — Greeley's American Conflict; Nicolay's Outbreak of the 
Rebellion; Moore's Rebellion Record, 12 vols.; Raymond's History of the 
Administration of President Lincoln; Compte De Paris, History of the 
Civil War in America, 4 vols.; Campaigns of the Civil War, 13 vols.; 
Official Army Register of the volunteer force of the United States Army, 
1861-5, parts 3 and 6; Reports on the Conduct of the War, 1865, 3 vols.; 
Official Records, War of the Rebellion, 7 vols. ; Medical and Surgical His- 
tory of the War of the Rebellion, vol. 1, part 3; Reports of the Woman's 
Relief Corps ; Bigelow's France and the Confederate Navy, 1862-8 ; Wil- 
liams's Negro Troops in the War of the Rebellion ; Wilson's, The Black 
Phalanx; A History of the Negro Soldiers of the U. S. ; Higginson's Army 
Life in a Black Regiment; Pinkerton's Spy of the Rebellion; Pitman's 
Trials for Treason ; Glisan's Journal of Army Life ; Steele's Frontier Army 
Sketches; Swinton's Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac; Van Home's 
History of the Army of the Cumberland; Gen. Logan's Volunteer Soldier 
of America; Gen. McClellan's Own Story, The War for the Union; Auto- 
biography of Private Dalzell ; Lee's Army Ballads and Other Poems; 
Brown's Bugle Echoes, Poetry of the Civil War, Northern, and Southern; 
True's Maine in the War of the Union ; Schouler's Massachusetts in the 
Civil War; Laciar's Patriotism of Carbon County, Penn., During the War 
of the Rebellion; Sprenger's Camp and Field Life of the 122d Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteers ; Jacob's Rebel Invasion of Maryland and Penn- 
sylvania; Capt. D. J. Wright's History of the 8th Regiment Kentucky 
Volunteer Infantry; Ohio Official Roster of Soldiers; Roster of the Ohio 
Soldiers in the War of the Rebellion, 3 vols.; Merrill's Soldier of Indiana 
in the War of the Union; Admire's Memoranda of Company E, 65th Reg- 
iment Indiana Infantry; List of ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines living in 
Iowa; Kelso's Reign of Terror in Missouri; Dunnet's Roster of Michigan 
Soldiers in Kansas; Moser's Roster of Iowa Soldiers in Kansas; Ellen Wil- 
liams's History of the 2d Colorado Regiment ; Stephens's Constitutional View 
of the War Between the States. 



I 



SIXTH BIENNIAL REPOBT. 



137 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS. 

The following is a list of gifts made to the Society of books and pamphlets 
by individuals and institutions, including exchanges and gifts of State pub- 
lications for exchanges with other societies and institutions: 



Donors. 



Abbott, J. B., DeSoto 

Abbott, Willis J., Kansas City, Mo 

Acadeinie de La Rochelle, Societe de Sciences Naturelles, La Rochelle, I'rance 

Academic des Belles-lettres, Sciences et Arts, La Rochelle, France 

Academie des Sciences et Belles-lettres, Dijon, France 

Adair, Rev. S. L., Osawatomie 

Adams, F. G., Topeka 

Adams, Frank Scott, Waterville 

Adams, John W., Topeka 

Adams, Rev. Edwin E., Chicago, 111 

Admire, J. V.. Osage City 

Admire, W. W., Topeka ■. 

Alabama Commissioner of Agriculture, Montgomery 

Alden, Edwin, Cincinnati, O 

Alexander, W. L., Des Moines, la 

Allen, A. T., Topeka 

Allen, Hon. E. B., Topeka ] 63 

Allison, W. M., editor Visitor, Wichita 

Alrich, L. L., Cawker City ! 

American Bell Telephone Co., Boston, Mass j 

American Congregational Association, Boston, Mass 

American Historical Association, Washington, D. C 

American Home Missionary Society, New York 3 

American Humane Association, Chicago, 111 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers, New York city 4 

American Museum of Natural History, New York city 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa 2 

American Protective Tariff League, New York city 

American Sunday-School Union, Philadelphia, Pa 

American Tract Society, New York city 1 

Ames, John G., Washington, D. C 

Anderson, Hon. John A., Washington, D. C j 

Andrews, Dr. Israel Ward, Marietta, O • 

Angell, George T., Boston, Mass ! 2 

Anthony, D. R., Leavenworth i 

Anthony, Gov. George T., Leavenworth 

Appleton, F. H., Boston, Mass i 4 

Arkansas Deaf-Mute Institute, Little Rock 

Armstrong and Nioyer, editors Gazette, Wyandotte 

Astor Library, New York I 

Atchison, Topeka &, Santa Fe Railroad Co., Boston, Mass 

Atwood, G. A., editor Republican, Manhattan 

Austin Industiial School, Knoxville, Tenn 

Ayer, N. W. & Son, Philadelphia, Pa ; -3 

Badger, Joseph E., Frankfort i 

Baker, G. C, Topeka I 

Baker, F. P., Topeka [ 68 

Baldwin, W. H., Boston, Mass. ! 1 

Ball, Mrs. Bell, Topeka 

Ban, R. W., Harper 

Bancroft Bros., San Francisco, Cal 1 

Barnes, J. S., Sec, Phillipsburg 

Barnes, Mrs. Charles, Manhattan 

Barnes, W. H., Sec, Independence 

Barton, C. M., Worcester, Mass 

Bass, A. & Co., McPherson ! •■ 

Bates, J. H., New York city 

Battell, Bobbins and Miss Anna, Norfolk, Conn 

Beadle & Adams, New York city 

Beezley, J. F., Sec, Girard 

Belfield, Henry H., Chicago, 111 

Belrose, Louis, Washington, D. C 

Bennett and Benham, editors Prohibitionist, Columbus 

Betton, Hon. Frank H., Topeka 

Bigelow, John, New York city 

Biggers, Mrs. Kate H., Longton .... 

Black, George, Olathe 

Blake, C. C, Richland 

Bonham and Palmer, editors Dispatch, Clay Center 

Boston Public Library, Boston, Mass 

Boston Public Schools, Boston, Mass 



Pamp 



138 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLEI'S-Continubd. 



Donors. 



Book*. 



Pamp 



BoudiDOt, W. P., Tablequah. I. T 

Boutwell, D. W., Topeka 

Bowes, G. W., Topeka 

Bracken, (ieorge C, l^wrence 

Bradford, Hon. S. B., Topeka 

Bradford, Mrs. M. K., Atchison 

Bradlee, Rev. C. D.. Boston, Mass 

Branuer, A. J., CliOon 

Brighani, Sarah M., Junction City ;.. •• •.• 

British and American Archselogical Society, Rome, Italy 

Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, N. Y..... 

Brown, Capt. John, jr.. Put-in- Hay Island, Ohio 

Brown, Dr. Francis H., Boston, Mass 

Brown, George W., Rockford, 111 

Brown, John M., Kansas City, Kas 

Brown, Joseph .M., .Atlanta, Ga 

Brown, Orville C, Adams, N. Y 

Brown, Rev. Duncan, Highland 

Browne, J. C, editor Hugle, Hurdett 

ButTalo Historical Society, lUiflalo, N. Y 

Bureau of Press Cuttings, New York city, N. Y 

Burnett, H. C, Santa Fe, N. M 

Burton & Black, editors Times, Ness City 

Bushell, W., Camden, N. J 

Caldwell, E. F., I>awrence 

California Historical Society, Berkeley, Cal 

California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco 

California University. Berkeley 

Campbell, J. B., Haddam 

Campbell, John Preston, Abilene 

Campbell, J. P., and D. A. Valentine, editors of the Times, Clay Center.. 

Campbell, M. M., North Topeka 

Canadian Institute, Toronto 

Carulhers, E. P., editor Index, Medicine Lodge 

Case, Nelson, Oswego 

Caspar, C. N., Milwaukee, Wis 

Cassell 4 Co., New York City 

Cavanaugh, Thomas H., Olympia, W. T 

Century Company, New York City 

ChaflTee, Rev. H. W. Ottawa 



Chamberlain, A. F., Toronto, Canada. 
Chambers, W. L., Stockton 



Chapman, E. L., editor Register, Great Bend 

Chapman, J. B., editor Tribune, Fort Scott 

Chicago Board of Public Works, Chicago, 111 

Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, ill 

Children's Aid Society, New York city 

Children's Hospital, iioston. Mass 

Childs, (ieorge W., Philadelphia, Pa 

Church Home for Orphan and Destitute Children, Boston, Mass 

Church Temperance Society, New York City 

Cincinnati Society of Natural History, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Clapp, Rev. A. H., D. D., New York City 

Clark, A. P., editor Republic, Washington, D. C 

Clark, Arthur, Leavenworth , 

Clark, (ieo. A., editor Republican, Junction City 

Clark, S. H. H., St. Louis 

Clarke, Robert, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Clarke, S. H.. Clyde, N. Y 

Clarkson, Harrison, Topeka 

Clement, G. W., Wichita 

Clough, J. P., secretary, Sabetha 

Cochrane, John ('., Chicago, HI 

Collet, C. D,, London, England 

Collins, J. S. A Co., Topeka 

Colorado Stale Agricultural College, Fort Collins 

Colorado State School of Mines, Denver 

Cone, William W., Topeka 

Congregational Sunday-School Publication Society, Boston, Mass... 

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven 

Cooke, Gen. P. St. George, Detroit, Mich 

Corbin, Caroline F., Chicago, III 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y 

Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Courtenay, William A., Charleston. S.C 

Cragln, F. W., Topeka 

Crane, Geo. W., Topeka 

(>awford. Gov. Samuel J., Topeka 

Crlswell, Ralph L, Gove City 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 



139 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS — Continued. 



Donors. 



Crosby, D. R., Minneapolis i 

Cruce, W. P., El Dorado I 

CuUin, Stewart, Philadelphia, Pa 

Cummins, C. S., Canema 

Currier, Charles, Leavenworth ! 

Cuthbertson, M. D., Voltaire 

Cutter, C. A., Boston, Mass 

Darling, C. W., Utica, N. Y : 1 

Davenport Academy of Science, Davenport, Iowa ! 

Davie, W. , Cincinnati, Ohio ! 8 

Davis, Charles S., editor Tribune, Junction City j 

Dedham Historical Society, Dedham, Mass 1 

DeGeer, Mrs. M. E., Topeka 

Delaware Historical Society, Wilmington ! l 

DeMotte, McK., editor Independent, Enterprise. 

Dennis, H. J., Topeka ; 3 

DesMoines Academy of Science, DesMoines, Iowa 

Dewey, A. T., San Francisco, Cal 

Dewey, Melvil, New York City 

Doane College, Crete, Neb 

Doniphan, Col. John, St. Joseph, Mo 1 

Dowling, Thomas, Washington, D. C 

Drummond, Frank, Topeka i 1 

Dunnett, D. W., Howard 1 

Earle, Pliny, Northampton, Mass i 1 

Easley, Ralph, editor News, Hutchinson 

Eastman, Dr. B. D., Topeka 6 

Eaton, Ben. A., editor Beacon, Wichita I 

Egle, Dr. W. H., Harrisburg, Pa i 2 

Eldridge, J. L., Topeka 

Elliott, L. R., Manhattan 

Essex Institute, Salem, Mass 41 

Fairchild, George T., Manhattan ^ 

Farmers Loan Company, Wintield 

Field, Millard L., Osawatomie 

Filson, T. A., and F. M., editors Times, Concordia 

Findlay, George W., Topeka : 

Fish, H. S., editor Chieftain, LaCrosse : 

Fisk, Clinton B., New York city ; 

Fiske, Daniel, Minneapolis, Minn i , 

Foley, J. M., Chicago. Ill 

Foote, A. E., Philadelphia, Pa 

Forde, E. M., Emporia 

Foster, Joseph, London, Eng 1 

Frenow, B. E., Washington, D. C 

Frost, Harry W., editor Lance, Topeka 

Fuller, Mrs. Mary, Washington, D. C 

Funk, John J., Sec, Peabody 

Funston, Hon. E. H., Washington, D. C 

Gallagher, F. W., Sec, St. Marys 

Galloway, John M., Topeka 

Gast, Hallie A., Fremont, Ohio 1 

Gazette Company, St. Joseph, Mo ■-■■ 

Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Ga t 

Gerard, Charles B., Anderson, Ind ' 1 

(iile,W.S., Venango 1 

Gillman, H. A., Supt. State Hospital for the Insane, Mount Pleasant, Iowa ! 

Gilmore, John S., Fredonia 

Girls' Higher School, Chicago, Hi i 

Globe-Democrat Co., St. Louis, Mo 

Goepel, Frank, Sec, Cawker City i 

Goodnow, Rev. I. T., Manhattan 2 

Graham, I. D,, Manhattan j 1 

Grand Chapter, Kansas I 1 

Grand Commandery, Kansas ' 2 

Green, Dr. Samuel A., Boston, Mass y. I 21 

Green, Samuel S., Worcester, Mass 

Greer, Ed. P., editor Courier, Winfield 

Griffin, Albert, New York city 

Griswold, W. M., Washington, D. C .- 

Guild, E. B., Topeka 

Hadley, T.J., Olathe 

Haifa, S. A., editor Nugget, Dorrance 

Hamilton, Hon. James W., Topeka 

Hampton, E. S., Detroit, Mich 

Hard, N. J., Topeka 

Harding, W. J., Hillsboro 

Harper, Rev, Joel, Wichita 

Harrington, Grant W., Lawrence 



140 



STATE HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY. 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS — Continued. 



Donors. 



Books. 



Pomp 



H»rt, Rev. O. E. MinDeapoIis 

Harvard University. Taiubridge, Mass 

Haskell, W. H.. Atchison 

Hayden, Rev. Horace Edwin, Wilkesbarre, Pa 

Healley. T. W. Wyandotte 

Heely, P. J., San Francisco 

Hein, O. L., Leavenworth 

Hendy, Rev. J. F., Eni|)oria 

Herald Company, St. .Joseph, Mo 

Higgins, L. L, To|>eka 

Higglnson, Thomas W., Cambridge, Mass.. 

Hile, J. W., Valley Falls 

Hill, Dr. G. H., Independence, la 

Hill, William L., St. Ix)uis, Mo 

Hinckley, Howard V., Topeka 

Hinton, R. J., New York city 

Hlrons, C. C. Topeka 

Historical and PhiloHophlcal Society of Ohio, Cincinnati. 
Historical Society of Southern California, Los Angeles.. 

Hodgdon, D. P., editor Prohibitionist, Lyons 

Hoffman, Rev. R. A., Downs 

HoUiday. C. K., Topeka 

Holman. Rev. C, North Topeka 

Holt, L. H. & Co., Topeka 

Hortou. Hon. A. H.. Topeka 

Howe, E. W., editor Globe, Atchison 

Fowland, Joseph A., Worcester, Mass 

Hudson, J. K., Topeka 

Hudson, Mrs. M. W., Topeka 

Hulbert, E. W., Sec, Fort Scott 

Hullng, Alden S., Topeka 

Humpnrey, Mrs. Mary A., function City 

Hutchins, B. S., editor Leader, Kingman 

Hiflr, J. M., Mound City 

Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station 

Illinois Industrial University, Champaign, 111 

Indian Rights .\s8ociation, Philadelphia, Pa 

Indiana Department of Statistics, Indianapolis 

Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis 

Indiana State Hoard of Health, Indianapolis 

Indianapolis Public Library, Indianapolis, Ind 

Industrial Mucalion Association, New York City 

Industrial I^eague, Philadelphia, Pa 

Ingalls, Hon, .John J., Washington, D. C 

Iowa, Adjutant General of 

Iowa Stale Agricultural College, Ames, Iowa 

Iowa State Ik)ard of Health, DesMoines 

Iowa State Historical .Society, Iowa City 

Iowa Stat« Library, DesMoines, Iowa 

Iowa Slate Veterinary Department 

Jackson, H. M., Atchison 

Jenkins, W. L,, lioston, Mass 

Jerome. F. E., Russell 

Johns Hopkins Universitv, Baltimore, Md 

Johns, Mrs. I^ura M., Salin 

Johnston, John ('., Secretary, Newton 

Journal Company, Kansas City, Mo 

Kansas Academy of Science, Topeka 

Kansas Board of Railroad Commissioners, Topeka 

Kansas State Teachers' Association 

Kaufman, A C., Charleston, S. C 

Kellam, T. J., Topeka 

Kellermao, W. A., Manhattan. 

Kelly, H. B, editor Freeman, McPberson 

Kenea A Lane, editors Journal, LaCygne 

Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station 

Kessler, D., Willis 

Kilmer, Fred. B , New Brunswick, N. J 

Knanp, F. A., Topeka 

Knapp, George W., Kendall 

Knight Brothers, New York City..,. 

Knox, Rev. J. D.. Topeka 

Knox, Rev, M. V. B., Littleton, N. H 

Knox, W. C. A Co.. Topeka 

Knudsen. C. W.. Norwalk. Conn 

KoBt, Dr. J., Tallahasse, Fla 

Ladd, Rev. H. O., Santa F6, N. M 

*l*mb,C. J,, editor Independent, Kirwin 

Lane, Ed. C, LaCygne 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 



141 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS — Continued. 



Donors. 



Langford & Stoke, editors Graphic, Great Bend 

Lathy, W. E., Newton 

Latimer, J. W., secretary, Pleasanton 

Lawhead, Hon. J. H., Topeka 

Lawrence, C. H., secretary, Hiawatha 

Lawrence, Mrs. Sarah E., Brookline, Mass 

Layton, William E., Newark, N. J 

Leahy, D. D., Kiowa 

Leavenworth, Mrs. J. C, Havertord College, Pa 

Lee, £d. G., editor Democrat, Frisco 

Lee, John I., editor Clipper, Ashland 

Leicester, Massachusetts, Public Library 

Leslie, Gov. Preston H., Helena, Montana 

Library Bureau, Boston, Massachusetts 

Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa 

Linn, John Blair, Bellefonte, Pa 

Lippincott, Dr. J. A., Lawrence 

Livingston County, New York, Historical Society, Danville, N. Y 

Lockley, Fred., editor Traveler, Arkansas City 

Logan, ilev. N. Rogers, Oskaloosa 

Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, N. Y 

Loue, Adolph, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Louisiana State Board of Health, New Orleans 

Lovett, J. T., Little Silver, N. J 

Loy, William E., San Francisco, Cal 

Lykins, W. H. R., Kansas City, Mo 

Lyons, J. A., DesMoines, Iowa 

MacLennau, Frank P., editor Journal, Topeka 

McAllaster, O. W., Lawrence 

McBride, Rev. R. E., Washington, Kas 

McCarthy, Hon. Timothy, Topeka 

McChesney, John W., Red Wing, Minn 

McConnell, W. K., Sec, Greenleaf 

McCrary, George W., Kansas City, Mo 

McDowell, S. O., Topeka 

McGill, G. M., editor Jacksonian, Cimarron 

McGregor, R. P., Baxter Springs 

McHarg, Rev. , Blue Rapids 

Mcllravy, E. L , Lawrence 

Mclntire, T., editor Democrat, Arkansas City 

McVicar, Dr. P., Topeka 

Maimonides Library, New York city 

Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, Orono, Me 

Manchester, Rev. Alfred, Providence, R. I 

Marsh, E. J., Leominster, Mass 

Marshall, Mary, Beloit 

Marston, C. W., Cedar Junction 

Martin, George W., editor of the Union, Junction City 

Martin, Gov. John A., Topeka 

May, Mrs. Celeste, Nelson, Neb 

Massachusetts Board of Lunacy and Charity, Boston 

Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics of Labor 

Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston 

Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Boston 

Massachusetts School for Feeble-Minded, Boston 

Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture, Boston 

Massachusetts State Agricultural Experiment Station, Amherst 

Mead, J. R., Wichita 

Meade and Dunham, editors Republican, McPherson 

Merrill, Miss Catherine, Indianapolis, Ind 

Michigan Agricultural College, Agricultural College P. O 

Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, Agricultural College P. O. 

Michigan Agricultural Farm Department, Constantine 

Michigan State Agricultural Society, Lansing 

Michigan State Board of Health, Lansing 

Mickey Bros. & Co., Stockton 

Midland College, Atchison 

Milford, M. E., Vinita, L T 

Miller, J. H., Helton 

Miller, Sol., Troy 

Milliken, Robert, Emporia 

Mills, T. B., Las Vegas, N. M 

Miner, E. N and L. A., New York city 

Minnesota Agricultural College, St. Paul 

Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Anthony Park 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul 

Mississippi Press Association, Vicksburg 

Mississippi State Agricultural College, Jackson 



. 100 

•I 1 

I 1 

. 2 

.1 1 



142 



STATE HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY. 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS— Continued. 



Donors. 



[ulvane.. 



Missouri Agricultural ExperimeDt Station, Ck>lumbia.. 

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy, Rolla 

Missouri State Agricultural College, Columbia 

Missouri Weather Service, Director of, St. Louis 

Mitchell, Joshua, Sec. Seneca 

Mobler, Martin, Topeka 

Montana Historical Society, Helena 

Montana Territorial Library, Helena. 

Moon, K. U., Topeka 

Moonlight, (iov. Thomas, Cheyenne. Wyoming 

Moore, Robert R., Topeka 

Moriarty, K. A., Sec, Council Grove 

Moser, O. A., Emporia 

Motter, John L., St. Joseph, Mo 

Mudge, Mrs. B. F., Manhattan 

Mulvane, Kansas Building and Loan Association, 

Munn A Co., New York city 

Murdock, T. B., editor Republican, El Dorado 

Murdock, M. M., editor Eagle, Wichita 

National Museum of Brazil, Rio Janeiro... 

National Young Woman's Christian Association, Chicago, III 

Nebraska .State Historical Society, Lincoln 

Nebraska Weather Service, Director of, Crete, Neb 

New England Historic Cenealogical Society, Boston, Mass 

New England Methodist Historical Society, Boston, Mass 

New England Society, New York city 

New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, Hanover 

New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord 

New Jersey Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Trenton 

New Jersey Historical Society, Newark 

New York Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Albany 

New York Institution for Deaf Mutes, New York city 

New York Life Insurance Co., New York city 

New York State Library, Albany 

Newlierry, Horace J., Topeka 

Newberry Library, Chicago 

Newlon, Dr. W.S., Oswego 

Nichols, C. D., Sec, Columbus 

North. F. W., Wichita 

North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, Raleigh 

North Carolina Board of Agriculture, Raleigh 

Norton, A. B., Dallas, Tex 

Norton, C. A., lieloit 

Ohio, Adjutant General of, Columbus 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, Columbus „ 

Ohio Meteorological Bureau, Columbus 

Ohio, Secretary of State, Columbus 

Ohio State School of Agriculture, Columbus 

OInev, Mrs. Emeline A., Madison, Wis 

Omaha Public Library, Omaha, Neb 

Oregon State Agricultural College, Corvallis '. 

Osgoodby, W. W.. Rochester, N. Y 

Owen, Col. Richard, New Harmony. Ind 

Ozlaa, J. W., Ottawa 

Parmalee, G. F., Topeka 

Paxton, W. .M., Platte City, Mo '..!!!."!"!!."!!!!!'..'.".".*.' 

Peabody Museum of American Archseology and Ethnology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Peacock. T. B., Topeka .„. 

Peck, Miss Ada H., Topeka 

Pecker, J. E., Concord, N. H 

Peffer, W. A., Topeka.. 



16 



Pennsylvania Agricultural Experiment Station, srateiyoilegci^^^^^ 
Pennsylvania iJoard of Agriculture, Harrisbiirg 



Pennsylvania .Museum and School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia. 

Pennsylvania State Penitentiary, Philadelphia 

Pennsylvania University, Philadelphia . . 

Perine, A. B.. Topeka 

Perine, Mary E., Topeka ....".'.'.'.'..'...".'.' 

Perine, .Mis.s Emma G., Topeka 

Peters, Hon. S. R.. Washington, D.C .'.'.".'.".'.'.".".!"" 

Peltilon, W. T., editor Democrat, Dodge City 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadeiphia. Pa.!.!!"'.!!! 

Phillips, Henry, jr., Philadelphia. Pa 

Phillips, William A., Salina. 

Philosophical Society of Wa-shington. D. C 

Pilling. J. C, Wa.shington, D.C 

Plumb, P. B., Washington, D. C 

Pomeroy, S. C, Washington, D. C 

Porter, W.G., Colby.,...! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 



143 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS — Continued. 



Donors. 



Books. Pamp 



Powell, F. M., Glenwood, la 

Powell, Mrs. Ella, Washington 

Pratt, W. D., Jetmore 

Prentis, Noble L., editor Republican, Newton 

Price, Viola V., Emporia 

Pritchett, C. W., Glasco, Mo 

Prohibition National Committee, New York city 

Providence Athenseum, Providence, R. I 

Railway Age Co., Chicago, 111 

Rastall, Mrs. Fanny H., Burlingame 

Rathbone, Charles, Sec, Peabody 

Redden, A. L., El Dorado 

Redden, Dr. J. W., Topeka 

Redington, .1. C. O., Topeka 

Reid, John M., Morrill 

Republican Editors of Washington 

Reynolds, R. E., Kingman 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence 

Rhodes, Rev, M., Atchison 

Rice, Allen Thorndike, New York city 

Rice, Franklin B., Worcester, Mass 

Rice, Hon. James, Denver, Col 

Rice, John H. and sons, editors Monitor, Fort Scott 

Ricksecker, J. H., and W. H. Page, Sterling 

Riser, H. C, Topeka 

Roberts, F, H., editor Independent, Oskaloosa 

Roe, A. S., Worcester, Mass 

Rohrer, G. W. C, editor Gazette, Abilene 

Rolling, H., Topeka 

Romero, M., Washington, D. C 

Root, F. A., North Topeka 

Ross, Gov. E. G., Santa Fe, N. M 

Roudebush, J. W., Topeka 

Rudisill, Rev. L. A., Topeka 

Russell, Ed., Lawrence 

Rust University, Holly Springs, Miss 

Ryan, Hon. Thomas, Washington, D. C 

Sampson, F. A., Sedalia, Mo 

San Francisco Public Library, Cal 

Sanborn, F. B., Concord, Mass 

Sargent, W. W., Holton 

Savage, James W., Omaha, Neb 

Sawyer, Mrs. A. H., Topeka 

Seabrook, S. L., Topeka 

Searl, A. D., Leadville, Col 

Semple, Gov. Eugene, Olympia, W. T 

Schulein, S., Ft. Scott 

Shelden, Alvah, editor Times, El Dorado 

Sheltering Arms, New York city 

Shelton, Prof. E. M., Manhattan 

Shepard, R. B., Anthony 

Shiner & Codding, editors Recorder, Westmoreland 

Shinn, A. C, Ottawa 

Sikes, J. R., Loudonville, Ohio 

Simmons, Dr. N., Lawrence 

Sims, Hon. William, Topeka 

Slonecker, J. G., Topeka 

Smith, B. F., Lawrence 

Smith, George W., Topeka 

Smith, G. Y., & Co., Kansas City, Mo 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C 

Snyder, Edwin, Sec, Oskaloosa 

Snyder, J. H., San Diego, Cal 

Spengler, John, Kansas City, Mo 

SociSte des Sciences, Lettres et Arts, De Pau, France 

Societe Historique, Litteraire, Artistique, et Scientifique, du Cher, Bourges.. 

Societe Nationale d' Agriculture de France, Paris 

Societe Nationale des Antiquaries de France, Paris 

Sone, F. D., Philadelphia, Pa 

South Carolina Department of Agriculture, Columbia 

South End Industrial School, Roxbury, Mass 

Southwick, Henry L., Boston, Mass 

Spangler, William W., Indianapolis, Ind 

Spelman's Seminary and Normal School, Atlanta, Ga 

Stacy, A. G., Topeka 

Stamp, Miss M. J., Topeka 

Stearns, J. N., New York city 

Stearns, Mrs. Mary E., Medford, Mass 

Stebbins, L. A., Lawrence 



77 



—10 



144 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS— Continued. 



Donors. 



Books. 



Stevens, Thomas, Hiawatha 

Stevens, Gov. E. A., Boise City, Idaho 

Stewart, William J., Boston^ Mass 

Swarr, D. M., Lancaster, Pa 

Swarthout, R. B., editor Journal, Caldwell 

Swezey, G. D., Crete, Neb 

Taylor, A. R., Emiioria 

Tavlor, Hawkins, Washington, D. C 

Tennessee State lioard of Health, Nashville 

Thacher, T. D., Toi>eka 

Thayer, Albert F., Maple Hill 

Thayer. Eli, Worcester, Mass 

Thohiann, G., New York city 

Thomas, Chester, jr.. Sec, Topeka 

Thomas, Don Lloyd, New York city 

Thompson, Dr. A. H., Topeka 

Thompson, Tom E., Howard 

Thurston, G. P., Nashville, Tenn 

Tilley, R. H., Newport, R. I 

Times Company, Kansas City, Mo 

Trimble, John,' Lansing, Mich 

Underwood, B. F., Chicago, 111 

U. S. Army Adjutant General, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Army Surgeon General. Washington, D. C 

U. S. Attorney General, Washington, D. C 

TT. S. Bureau of Navigation, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Bureau of Statistics, Treasury Department, Washington, D. C, 

U. S. Chief of Engineers, U. S. A., Washington, D. C 

U. S. Chief of Ordnance, U. S. A., Washington, D, C 

U. S. Commissioner of Agriculture, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Commissioner of Education, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Commissioner of Labor, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, D. C 

U. S, Fish Commissioner, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Geological Survey, Director of, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Hydrographic Office, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Inter-State Commerce Commission, Washington, D. C 

U.S. Life-Saving Service, Washington, D. C 

U.S. Lighthouse Board, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Mint, Director of, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Nautical Almanac, Supt. of, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md 

U. S. Naval Observatory, Washington, D. C , 

U. S. Secretary of State, Washiiieton, D. C 

U. S. Secretary of the Interior, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Secretary of the Treasury, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Secretary of War, Washington, D. C , 

U. 8. Signal Office, Washington, D. C 

U. 8. Signal Service, Washington, D. C 

U. S. Signal Station, Observer of, Leavenworth 

Unknown 

Utley, H. M., Detroit, Mich 

Vail, Bishop T. H., Topeka 

Valentine, Hon. D. M., Topeka 

Van Hoesen, I. N., Sec, Lawrence 

Vermont Agricultural Experiment Station, Burlington 

Virginia Department of Agriculture, Richmond 

Virginia (Jranger, editor of, Portsmouth, Va 

Virginia Historical Society, Richmond 

Votaw, Daniel, Independence 

Wait, Mrs. Anna C, editor Beacon, Lincoln 

Wakefield, W. H. T., editor Anti-Monopolist, Enterprise 

Walker, I. H., Adams, Ind 

Wallace, H. B., Sec, Sallna 

Waller, W. F., editor Republican, Council Grove... 

Ward, Henry A., Rochester, N. Y :.... 

Ward, Mrs. .Jennie M., Ottawa 

Ward, Rev. M. L., Ottawa 

Washington. B. T., Tuskegee, Ala 

Wasser % Flint, editors Press, Girard 

Waueb, Rev. Ix>renzo, Petal u ma, Cal 

Webb. W. D.. Atchison 



88 



10 



Weber, G. A., St, Louis 

Weeks, Stephen B., Chapel Hill, N. C 

Welsh, Herbert, Philadelphia, Pa 

Welsh, L. A., I>eavenworth 

Western Reserve and Northern Ohio Historical Society, Cleveland, O., 



Sixth Biennial Re poet. 



145 



DONORS OF BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS — Concluded. 



Donors. 



Books. 



Pamp 



Western Unitarian Association, Chicago, 111 

Wharton, Francis, Washington, D. C 

Whitman, Albery A., Topeka 

Whittemore, L. D., Topeka 

Whittlesey, Frederick A., Eochester, N. Y 

Wilcox, P. P., Denver, Col 

Wilder, D. W., Topeka 

Wilder, E., Topeka 

Wilder, Mrs. C. F., Manhattan 

Wiley, H. W., Washington, D. C 

Wilson, W. J., Sec, Winfield 

Winchester Historical Genealogical Society, Winchester, Mass. 

Wisconsin Agricnltural Experiment Station, Madison 

Wisconsin Board of Health, Madison 

Wisconsin State Grange, Neenah 

Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison 

Wollstein, M., Kansas City, Mo 

Woman's Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa 

Woman's National Republican Committee, New York city 

Wood, S. N., Woodsdale 

Woodford, J. E., Sec, Burlington 

Woodward, C. L., New York city 

Wooster, L. C, Eureka 

Worcester Free Public Library, Worcester, Mass 

Worcester Society of Antiquity, Worcester, Mass 

Worrall, Harvey, Topeka 

Wright, T. J., Atchison 

Wright, W. S., Stockton 

Wyoming Historical and Geological Society, Wilkesbarre 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn 

Yoe, W. T., and C, editors Tribune, Independence 

Yonge, H. A., editor Democrat, Beloit 

Young, H. W , Independence 

Young Men's Christian Association, Topeka 

Yuran, Jason, Blue Rapids 

Zirkle, H. W.. Burrton 



. 12 



2 
1 
2 
1 
474 
1 
6 
1 

10 
5 



DONORS OF MANUSCRIPTS. 

Abbott, James B., DeSoto: Pen-and-ink sketch of an early citizen of Kan- 
sas, written by Gen. James G. Blunt; Manuscript muster-roll of the 
Sewannoe (Shawnee) Company, Co. G., mustered for the protection of 
Kansas Territory. 

Adams, H. J., Topeka: Poll-book of the election in school district number 
22, Shawnee county, Kansas, August 28, 1886. 

Alexander, Mrs. Loise L., Lawrence: Biographical sketch of Louis S. 
Leary, of Oberlin, Ohio, who was killed at Harper's Ferry, Va., October 
17, 1859, in John Brown expedition. 

Alrich, Mrs. E. B., Cawker City : Autobiographical sketch, with editorial 
experiences of donor, dated December 22, 1887. 

Ashbaugh, Mrs. Sophia, Topeka: By-laws and minutes of M. E. Sewing 
Society of Topeka, from November 7, 1861, to March 24, 1864, (four- 
quire blank book); Constitution, by-laws and minutes of the Topeka 
Woman Suffrage Association, from November, 1867, to November, 1875, 
(three-quire blank book) ; Constitution and proceedings of the Topeka 
Busy-Bee Society, from February 19, 1877, to May 25, 1881, (three-quire 
blank book); the same from May 12, 1881, to July 12, 1883, (three-quire 
blank book.) 



146 State Historical Society. 

Bailey, L. D., Garden City : Five muster-rolls and one exemption-roll of 
Kansas Militia, 1858, for the precincts of Columbia, Russell, Eagle 
Creek, Florence and Shellrock Falls, in Madison (now Lyon) county, 
Kansas, in the 7th Brigade, commanded by Gen. John W. Whistler, the 
enrollment having been made by donor as enrolling officer under his oath 
of office, February 26, 1858, which is indorsed on the roll for Russell 
precinct. 

Baker, C. C, Topeka: Petitions presented to the Kansas Legislature, 1887, 
on the subject of Woman Suffrage; petition of 85 boys and girls of 
Galena, Kansas, for passage of laws for their protection from the manu- 
facture and sale of alcoholic beverages. 

Botkin, Theo., Attica: Statement of donor relative to a conference between 
John Brown, Augustus Wattles and James Montgomery, concerning John 
Brown's Harper's Ferry expedition. 

Bowman, Mrs. Mary M., Abilene: Autobiographical sketch with editorial 
experiences of donor, dated December 1, 1887. 

Bray, Miss Olive P., Topeka: Autobiographical sketch with editorial expe- 
riences of donor, dated November 30, 1887. 

Britton, R., Oakland, Iowa: Copy of donor's poem entitled "Kansas." 

Brown, Dr. George W., Rockford, 111.: Letter of donor containing histori- 
cal reminiscences of Kansas; Account of the founding of Emporia, Kan- 
sas, dated October 8, 1887 ; Letter of James Christian, dated Arkansas 
City, Kansas, September 29, 1887, containing an account of the recovery 
of writer's eyesight; Letter of donor relative to pamphlet entitled "The 
Man With The Branded Hand," dated April 25th, 1887, and addressed 
to Rev. Photius Fisk; Letter of George N. Hill, relating to foregoing, 
dated Boston, Mass., May 22, 1887. 

Brown, John, jr., Put-in-Bay Island, Lake Erie, Ohio; Copy of letter of 
Marshall Johnson to donor, dated Jefferson, Ashtabula county, Ohio, 
January 24, 1860, and letter of donor in reply, dated Dorset," Ashtabula 
county, January 25, 1860; having reference to the effort of the marshal 
to arrest Captain Brown for complicity in the Harper's Ferry invasion ; 
Original manuscript entitled "Phrenological Description of John Brown, 
as given by O. S. Fowler," dated New York, February 27, 1847. 

Burton, Mrs. Mary L., Jamestown : Autobiographical sketch and editorial 
experiences of donor, dated December 6, 1887. 

Casselle, Charles, Horton : Letter of donor, dated Oct. 1, 1888, giving his 
recollections of steamboating on the Kansas river, in 1855. 

Clark, Arthur, Leavenworth: Letter of Col. Philip St. George Cooke, 
dated May 19, 1855, in reply to inquiries made by Dr. Samuel F. Few 
and George Rnssell of Leavenworth, relative to the custody of certain 
persons accused of crimes or political offenses. 

Clarke, S. H., Clyde, N. Y.: Letter written by Hon. S. C. Pomeroy to 
George S. Park, dated April 24, 1855, relative to the destruction of the 



Sixth biennial Bepobt. 147 

Parkville Luminary, Parkville, Mo., by Pro-slavery men ; letters written 
by S. C. Pomeroy to donor, Oct. 19, 1855, and July 30, and Dec. 7, 1859 
relative to Kansas affairs; certificate of membership in New York State 
Kansas Emigration Company, share No. 848, S5, dated March, 1857. 

Cuthbertson, M. D., Voltaire: Letter written by Gen. John A. Logan, 
dated June 15, 1885, to donor, acknowledging letter of congratulation on 
the reelection of Gen. Logan to the United States Senate. 

Darling, C. W., Utica, N. Y. : Proceedings of the Oneida Historical Society, 
November 28, 1887; "Ancestry of Darling." 

Emerson, Joseph W., Zeandale : Keminiscences of donor's early Kansas ex- 
periences. 

Fisk, Rev. Photius, Boston, Mass.: Autograph of Captain John Brown, 
given donor in 1859, as the giver was about to leave Massachusetts for 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia. 

Flenniken, B. F., Clay Center: Hand-made newspaper published February 
4th, 1878, by Elias Cunningham, of Middletown, Conn., vol. 3, No. 136, 
entitled "The Young American." 

Goodnow, Prof. I. T., Manhattan : Personal reminiscences of emigration to 
Kansas in 1855, paper read at the meeting of the Kansas State His- 
torical Society, January 17, 1888; letter written to donor by George Wal- 
ter, dated New York, November 22, 1854, relative to the Kansas American 
Settlement Company, proposing the settlement at Council City, now 
Burlingame, Osage county, Kansas; letter of Hon. Eli Thayer to donor, 
dated Worcester, Mass., February 25, 1888, relative to the settlement of 
the Manhattan, Kansas, colonies in 1855, under the auspices of the New 
England Emigrant Aid Company. 

Harding, Benjamin, Wathena: Minutes of the Union League of America, 
No. 68 of Wathena, from August 14, 1863, to June 23, 1864. 

Hogbin, Mrs. Flora P., Sabetha: Autobiographical sketch with editorial 
experiences of donor, dated April 13, 1888. 

Holcombe, B. I., Monticello, Mo. : Letter of donor dated Kirksville, Mo., 
July 19, 1887, on Missouri bibliography. 

Hughes, Thomas, Mound City: Autograph letter of Gen. William H. Har- 
rison addressed to his wife, Mrs. Anna Harrison, Cincinnati, Ohio, dated 
Headquarters, Franklinton, June 12, 1813. 

Hunter, Mrs. M. J., Salina: Autobiographical sketch with editorial experi- 
ences of donor, dated November 30, 1887. 

Jeffers, D. B., McPherson, Kansas: Portion of letter envelope addressed to 
donor from Edinburgh, Scotland, lost in the mail by the sinking of the 
steamer Oregon off Fire Island, N. Y., March 14, 1886; recovered July 
1-4, 1886, and forwarded to donor by the postmaster of New York City, 
with explanatory note attached. 

Jones, Horace L., Salina: Letter written by T. AV. Scudder, Topeka, to 
John H. Kagi, dated May 22, 1857; discharge of John H. Kagi from 



148 State Historical Society. 

service in Co. B, 2d Reg. Kas. Vols., invasion of 1856, signed by Capt. 
W. F. Creitz and Col. C. Whipple ( Aaron Dwight Stevens ), dated Octo- 
ber 1, 1856; letter of L. Clephane to John H. Kagi, written for G. 
Bailey, jr., editor of the National Era, Washington, D. C, dated January 
26, 1857, relating to Kansas correspondence. 

Kansas House of Representatives, 1887, by resolution: One hundred and 
sixty-five petitions for municipal suffrage for women, presented to the 
Kansas Legislature of 1887, by Mrs. Fanny H. Rastall, President of the 
Kansas Woman's Temperance Union, and Mrs. Laura M. Johns, Presi- 
dent of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. 

Knapp, George W., Clyde : Paper written by D. L. Chandler, giving an 
account of the naming of Cloud county, Kansas, dated March 13, 1885. 

Lane, V. J., Wyandotte: Copy of a manuscript letter of credit, confidence 
and good-will, written by Gov. Sam Houston, of Texas, in behalf of 
James St. Louis, a Delaware Indian chief, dated April 15, 1843. 

Lawrence, Mrs. Sarah E., Longwood, Brookline, Mass. : Ten manuscript 
books of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, 1854-1862, con- 
sisting of accounts of original shares of stock, with names of sharehold- 
ers, namely, one cash book, one journal, three ledgers, two books of 
quitclaims, and one book containing 256 type-writer copies of letters 
written by Amos A. Lawrence, while treasurer of the Emigrant Aid 
Company from 1854 to 1861 inclusive, all relating to Kansas; 12 papers 
relating to the affairs of the Kansas land trust fund, of dates from 1856 
to 1870. 

Maloy, John, Council Grove: Letter of donor, August 4, 1888, relative to 
the naming of Dorn county, now Cherokee county, Kansas. 

Marple, Ezekiel, North Topeka: "Pass" given by a pro-slavery committee 
at Chillicothe, Mo., September 10, 1856, addressed to Lieut. Col. Jeff. 
Thompson, St. Joseph, giving donor passport with wagons through Mis- 
souri to Kansas, signed, H. D. Renney, Ed. S. Darlington, N. J. Bliss. 

Martin, Gov. John A., Atchison: Letter written by Mrs. Mary Martin, 
Claflin, Barton county, July 22, 1888, to Gov. Martin, transmitting photo 
portrait, group of triplets, children of John W. and Mary Martin, 15 
months old, Loy C, Roy B. and Floy G. Martin. 

Moore, Milton R., Topeka: Day-book of the Kansas Magazine Company, 
Topeka, entries from January 1, 1872, to October 15, 1873, 143 pages; 
ledger of same, 215 pages; subscription book of same with alphabetic 
lists of subscribers to the magazine; scrap book containing editorial no- 
tices of the Kansas Magazine. (See miscellaneous list.) 

Morse, O. E., Mound City: Letter of donor, dated July 27, 1887, relating 
to the attempted rescue of Capt. John Brown from the Charlestown, Va., 
prison, by Col. James Montgomery and others. 

Northrop, H. M., Wyandotte: Certificate of donation of $1,000, made by 

^ Mrs. Margaret Northrop, April 15, 1867, to secure to the citizens of Kan- 



SIXTH BIENNIAL REPOBT. 149 



sas a pew in the Metropolitan Memorial M. E. Church at Washington, 
D. C, with autographs of Geo. U. S. Grant, Chief Justice S. P. Chase, 
and others ; letter of donor transmitting the foregoing, dated Wyandotte, 
July 6, 1887. 

Phillips, William A., Salina : Autograph letter of John H. Kagi, addressed 
to donor, dated Tabor, Iowa, Feb. 7, 1859, relating to the last party of 
fugitive slaves escorted by John Brown from Missouri through Kansas ; 
letter of donor, dated Jan. 12, 1888, transmitting foregoing. 

Pike, J. A., Florence: Letter of donor, June 23, 1887, relative to the at- 
tempted rescue of Captain John Brown from Charlestown, Va., prison, 
by Col. James Montgomery and others. 

Pritchard, Miss L. D., Millbrook: Autobiographical sketch, with editorial 
experiences of donor, dated Dec. 11, 1887. 

Prouty, S. S., Topeka: Volume containing 117 letters written by contribu- 
tors, in 1885-6, to Hon. J. V. Admire, concerning the one-thousaud-dollar 
Prouty Fund. 

Reed, Miss Adele, Westphalia: Autobiographical sketch with editorial ex- 
periences of donor, dated Dec. 6, 1887. 

Remington, J. B., Osawatomie: Copies of original manuscripts now in the 
possession of Maj. Remington, being official and semi-official papers of 
the Confederate Government in the War of the Rebellion, and which came 
into the possession of Maj. Remington at the residence of Jefferson Davis 
at the capture of Richmond in April, 1865, 7 papers. Given to the 
Society at the solicitation of Capt. John Brown, jr. 

Salter, Mrs. S. M., Argonia: Autograph card and portrait of donor, Mayor 
of Argonia, 1887. 

Sherman, A. C, Rossville: Letter of Dr. W. R. Sherman, written to his 
daughter, Alice M. Sherman, and dated Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, Nov. 6, 1856 ; 

r speaks of the proposed extension of slavery and of the outrages in Kan- 
sas. 

Simpson, Mrs. W. H., Topeka: Order, dated Hartford, Conn., Dec. 2, 1776, 
directed to Chauncey Whittlesey, great-grandfather of donor, by Gov. 
Jonathan Trumbull. 

Smith, Charles W., Lawrence: The six original poll-books of the city elec- 
tion at Lawrence, April 5, 1887 — the first city election at which women 
voted in Kansas. 

Smith, George W., Topeka: Manuscript receipt book of Docket Clerk, Kan- 
sas House of Representatives, 1887, containing autographs of members ; 
book containing petitions of settlers of Finney, Hodgeman and Ford 
counties, Kansas, praying the Legislature of 1887 to establish a new 
county to be called Banner county; subscription book containing auto- 
graphs of members of Kansas House of Representatives, 1887, contrib- 
utors to the purchase of a gold watch for Chaplain J. A. Bright ; petition 
of residents of Butler county, Kansas, praying the Legislature of 1887 



150 State Historical Society, 

to prohibit county commissioners from building a bridge across White- 
water river in Augusta township ; petition of residents of Osage county 
to Senate of 1887 for an appropriation for an Industrial School for girls; 
pledge of members of House of Representatives of 1883 to the support 
of certain railroad legislation. 

Thayer, Eli, Worcester, Mass.: Letter of donor, dated October 13, 1887, re- 
lating to a meeeting held at Cambridge, Mass., November 17, 1856, for 
the purpose of discussing the "Kansas Question." 

Wait, Mrs. Anna C, Lincoln : Autobiographical sketch with editorial ex- 
periences of donor, dated December 6, 1887. 

Washburn, A., Topeka: Manuscript account of Revolutionary powder-horn 
given by him to the Historical Society. 

Wilcox, P. P., Denver, Colo. : Manuscript letters, March and April, 1887 ; 
Original letter of Rev. Pardee Butler to Hon. P. P. Wilcox of Denver, 
dated Framingham, Kansas, January 25, 1887, relating to early Kansas 
affairs. 

Wilder, D. W., Topeka: Copy of Col. John A. Martin's official report of ac- 
tions of the Third Brigade, First Division 20th Army Corps, dated Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn., September 28, 1863. 

Yates, E. N., Leavenworth : Original confederate muster-roll, captured by 
donor, while marching with Sherman's army through Georgia, in 1864. 

DONORS OF MAPS, CHARTS, AND ATLASES. 

Andrews and Payne, Salina: Copy of Phil. Q. Bond's plat of Salina, Kan- 

sas, January 16, 1887. 
Baker, F. P., Topeka: Pilot charts of the North Atlantic ocean, May, June 

and July, 1887. 
Bartholomew & Co., Topeka : Map of the city of Topeka, 1887. 
Bartlett, J. R., Washington, D. C: Monthly pilot charts of the Northerrf 

Atlantic ocean for the years 1887, 1888, 24 maps. 
Bass, A. & Co., McPherson: Map of College Place addition to the city of 

McPherson. 
Bennett, J. H., Holton: Pocket map of Shawnee and Wyandotte lands in 

Kansas Territory, compiled from U. S. surveys by Robert L. Lawrence, 

March, 1857. 
Black, John C, Washington, D. C: Holman & Cowdons's statistical map 

of the United States, 1888. 
Bradlee, Rev. Dr. C. D., Boston, Mass.: Copy of Edward E. Clark's map 

of the city of Boston, 1885. 

Clark, Arthur, Leavenworth: Map of Kansas and the Pike's Peak region, 
1859. ^ 

Clark, Robert, Cincinnati, Ohio: Atlas to accompany reports of geoloffical 

survey of Ohio, 1873. 
Griswell, Ralph L., Gove City: Map of Gove City, Kansas, 1888. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 151 

Edwards, John P., Quincy, 111.: Wall maps of Douglas county, Kansas, 
1887, of Johnson county, Kansas, 1886, Wyandotte county, Kansas, 1886, 
and Jackson county, Missouri, 1887. 

Goodnow, Prof. I. T., Manhattan: Map of Greenwood County, Kansas, 
showing lands of M. K. & T. Rly., 1871 ; Map of Wilsonton, 1888; Map 
of Pottawatomie Reserve Lands ; Map of part of Kansas Pacific Rail- 
way lands; Map of M. K. & T. Railway lands in Woodson county; 
Map of part of the land of the A. T. & S. F. Railroad Company in 
Kansas; Map of Ashland, Riley county, 1857; Map of St. George, Pot- 
taw^atomie county, K. T. ; Adams & Elliott's Map of Kansas ; Map of M. 
K. & T. Railway lands in Neosho Valley ; Phillips' Map of the United 
States, Liverpool ; Map of Denver & Rio Grande Railway and connec- 
tions, Chicago, 1877; Four New York Tribune war maps, 1861 and 1862 ; 
Map of the War in Europe, 1870; Map of the Great Central Route 
between the Atlantic and the Mississippi, 1854; Map of the lands of the 
Ontario Colony, San Bernardino county, California. 

Griffing, William J., Manhattan : Archaeological chart of Manhattan and 
vicinity, 1888, made by donor, showing results of explorations and in- 
vestigations made by him and other members of the Agricultural College 
Scientific Club. 

Hale, George D., Topeka: Map of Denver, Colorado, 1888. 

Hall & O'Donald, Topeka: Chart containing roster of Kansas State, 
county, and Federal ofiicers, May, 1888. 

Heath, D. C. & Co., Boston, Mass. : Four outline maps of the United States. 

Hord, B. M., Nashville, Tenn.: Tennessee Agricultural and Geological 
Map, 1888. 

Jerome, F. E., Wilson: Atlas containing plates to accompany the second 
volume of the Geological Survey of Wisconsin, 1876. 

Kansas Railroad Commissioners, James Humphrey, Almerin Gillett and 
A. R. Greene, Topeka : Railroad maps of Kansas, 1886 and 1887, 20 
copies. 

Kenea, J. P. and Ed. C. Lane, LaCygne: Map showing the Congressional 
districts of Kansas, published in LaCygne Journal, March 10, 1883. 

Krarup, M. C, Ellis : Map showing the lands of W. T. Hansen, in Graham, 
Trego, Rooks and Ellis counties, Kansas. 

Kuhn, Henry, Rhoades, Kansas: Copy of E. C. Boudinot's map of the 
Indian Territory, 1879. 

Kurtz, Charles H., Newton : Map of Newton, Kas., 1887. 

Lawrence, Mrs. Sarah E., Longwood, Brookline, Mass.: Colton's map of 
Nebraska and Kansas, 1854. 

Marston, C. W., Cedar Junction: Map entitled "An Accurate Map of 
North America, Showing the British and Spanish Dominions According 
to the Treaty of Paris, of February 10, 1763." London. 

Meacham, J. H., Sabetha: Meacham's Illustrated Atlas of Brown and 
Nemaha counties, Kas., 1887. 



152 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Mohler, Martin, Topeka : Map of Grove City, Kansas, 1888. 

Mudge, Mrs. B. F., Manhattan : Six maps of the Yellowstone country. 

Ferine, Clara E., Topeka: Map of Wabaunsee county, Kansas, 1887. 

Radges, Samuel, Topeka: Two maps of Kansas, showing new counties as 
established by the Legislature of 1887. 

Rand, McNally & Co., Chicago, 111.: Large sectional map of southern Cali- 
fornia; indexed map of Nebraska; pocket maps of Louisiana, Utah and 
the Indian Territory, 1887 ; commercial map of the United States and 
Canada, 1887; official railroad map of United States and Canada, 1887; 
pocket maps of Minnesota, Washington Territory, Arizona Territory, 
and Dakota Territory; pocket map and shippers' guide of Kansas, 1888; 
pocket map of Colorado, 1887. 

Ricksecker, J. H., and W. H. Fage, Sterling: Map of the city of Sterling, 
October, 1886; map of Rice county, Kansas, September, 1886. 

Ross, Robbins & Co., Topeka: Map of Topeka and additions, 1887. 

Secretary of the Interior, Washington, D. C: Atlas to accompany Hern- 
don & Gibbon's Report of Exploration of the Valley of the Amazon, 
1854; 60 maps of the Coast Survey, 1855. 

Sherrill, J. E., Danville, Ind.: Map of Mertilla, Kansas, containing price 
list of lots, 1887. 

Sims, William, Topeka: Map of Kansas with new counties, 1887. 

Stubbs, A. W., Santa F4, Kansas: Illustrated historical atlas of the State 
Iowa, 1875. 

Talbott, Albert G., Wyandotte: Map of Kansas City Kansas and vicinity, 
1887. ■ 

Thacher, T. D., Topeka: Military map of Kansas, Rand, McNally & Co., 
Chicago, 1886. 

Wasser & Flint, Girard: Map of Girard, Kansas, 1886; Map of Crawford 
county, Kansas, 1886; Map showing line of Chicago, Jefferson City, 
Girard & Facific Railroad through Missouri and Kansas, in Girard 
Fress, May, 4, 1887. 

Watson, George W., Topeka: Map of Florence, Kansas, 1887; Map of the 
city of Topeka, 1887. 

DONORS OF PICTURES. 

Abbott, J. B., De Soto : Miniature monogram of the members of the Kan- 
sas House of Representatives, Republican and Democratic separate, 1868. 

Abbott, Mrs. James B., De Soto : Fhoto portrait of donor. 

Adams, F. G., Topeka: Nine of Winslow & Homer's Campaign Sketches 
of the War of the Rebellion, by L. Frang & Co. ; portrait of Gen. Ben- 
jamin Harrison, Republican candidate for Fresident, 1888. 

Adams, Mrs. Daniel M., North Topeka: Large photo portrait of Chester 
Thomas, sr., gilt frame. 

Admire, W. AV., Topeka: Fhoto picture of the grave of Mrs. Nancy Hanks 
Lincoln, mother of Abraham Lincoln, at Boonville, Indiana. 



Sixth biennial repobt. 153 

Alrich, Mrs. E. B., Cawker City: Cabinet photo portrait of donor, 1887. 

Amos, J. Wayne, Salina: Cabinet photo portrait of donor. 

Anthony, Daniel K., Leavenworth: Lithograph picture of donor's stock 
, farms at Baileyville, Nemaha county, and Huron, Atchison county, Kan- 
sas, also of the Leavenworth Times building, and of donor's private resi- 
dence in Leavenworth city; steel engraved portrait of donor. 

Armstrong, John, Topeka: Cabinet photo portrait of donor, 1888. 

Bailey, Zachariah, Topeka: Lithograph monogram, portraits of Miss Frances 
E. Willard, Gov. John P. St. John, Hon. Alfred Colquitt, and Gen. Neal 
Dow. 

Baker, C. C, Topeka: Photo group, caricature, of Gen. Ben Butler and 
Sand Lot Kearney ; photo view of Commonwealth office and State cap- 
itol; stereoscopic view of the Gunnison Review office, Gunnison, Colo. 

Bixby, Charles S., Osawatomie: Stereoscopic view of Osawatomie gas well, 
No. 1, 1887. 

Bradlee, Rev. Dr. C. D., Boston, Mass. : Photo portrait of donor. 

Brown, Dr. George W., Rockford, 111. : Cabinet photo portrait of Rev. Pho- 
tius Fisk, with inscription by donor; and cabinet photo portrait of donor. 

Burton, Mrs. Mary L,, Jamestown : Cabinet photo portrait of donor. 

Butler, Rev. Pardee, Farmington : Cabinet photo portrait of donor. 

Century Company, New York City, N. Y. : Portraits of Lincoln banner, be- 
longing to the Historical Society ; Photos of certificate and autograph of 
Gov. John W. Geary, with the seal of the Territory of Kansas attached 
to the pardon of Milton Kinzler, dated March 2, 1857. 

Clarke, S. H., Clyde, N. Y. : Cabinet portrait of donor, 1888 ; Photo portraits 
of Secretary Edwin M. Stanton, President Andrew Johnson, Frederick 
Douglass, William H. Seward, Anna Dickinson; of Washington and 
Lincoln, grouped; and of P. T. Barnum and Gen. Tom Thumb and Com- 
modore Nutt and their wives, grouped. 

Coon,G. L., Jewell City: Photo of Ashtabula, Ohio, railroad disaster, Decem- 
ber 29, 1876. 

Copeland, Mrs. Delila, Oberlin, Ohio : Photo portrait of John A. Copeland, 
associate of John Brown, executed at Charlestown, Virginia, December 
16, 1859. 

Drake, A. W., Century Co., N. Y. : Proofs of Kansas pictures in Century 
Magazine, illustrating the Abraham Lincoln serial, 1887, 12 engravings. 

Emerson, Joseph W., Zeandale: Photo portrait of donor. 

Everest, H. W., Wichita: Garfield University Memorial Picture, Wichita, 
Kansas. 

Farnsworth, H. W., Topeka: Cabinet photo portrait of donor, taken Feb. 1, 
1887. 

Fisk, Rev. Photius, Boston, Mass.: Ambrotype picture of Dr. John Doy 
and the members of the party who rescued him from jail at St. Joseph, 
Missouri, July 23, 1859. 



154 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Foley, J. M., Chicago, 111.: Monogram containing portraits of the seven 
anarchists condemned for throwing dynamite bombs, May 4, 1886. 

Goodnow, Prof. I. T., Manhattan : Two cabinet photo portraits of donor, 
taken, one in 1852, the other in 1886. 

Harding, Benjamin, Wathena: Cabinet photo of donor. 

Harris, E. P., Topeka: Cabinet photo of donor, 1886. 

Heatley, Thomas W., Wyandotte: Photo portrait of Kichard Realf, the 
original from which the engraved portrait of the poet was taken for 
Lippincott's Magazine, March, 1879. 

Hogbin, Mrs. Flora P., Sabetha: Cabinet photo of donor. 

Hubbard, H. R., R. P. McGregor, A. N. Chadsey, E. H. Brown, L. D. 
Kirkman, members of the House of Representatives, 1887: Monogram 
containing photo portraits of sixty-nine ex-soldiers, members and officers 
of the Kansas House of Representatives, 1887. 

Hubbard, J. M., Middletown, Conn.: Cabinet photo portrait of donor, 
1887. 

Ingalls, John J., Atchison : Photograph of fly-leaves of John Brown's bible, 
containing inscription to John F. Blessing, Charlestown, Virginia, and 
autograph of Captain Brown. 

Jerome, F. E., Wilson: Cabinet photo portraits of donor and his daughter. 

Johnson, Col. Alexander S., Topeka: Life-size crayon portrait of donor. 

Kagy, Joseph R., Findlay, Ohio: Photo portrait of John Henry Kagi, of 
Kansas and Harper's Ferry. 

Lawrence, Mrs. Sarah E., Longwood, Brookline, Mass. : The Albion Gal- 
lery, N. Y., 1843, a volume of seven engravings, with text; "Picturesque 
Sketches in Spain," London, 1837, a volume containing 26 sketches, 
principally of Spanish architecture, by David Roberts. 

Lescher, T. H., Topeka: Portrait of donor, printed by Blue process, 1887. 

McGregor, R. P., Baxter Springs : Photograph of soldiers' monument erected 
by the U. S. Government to the memory of the officers and soldiers killed 
in the battle of Baxter Springs, Kansas, October 6, 1863, and other engage- 
ments in this vicinity, who are buried near the monument, and whose 
names are inscribed thereon. 

Martin, Gov. John A., Atchison: Photo portraits, group of triplets, children 
of John W. and Mary Martin, Claflin, Barton county, Kansas, 15 months 
old, July, 1888— Loy C, Roy B., and Floy G. Martin. 

Martin, H. T., Topeka: Cabinet photo portrait of Louis S. Leary, associate 
of John Brown, copied from daguerrotype in possession of his daughter, 
Louise Leary Alexander, of Douglas county, Kansas; cabinet photo 
portraits of Kansas State officers and members of the Legislature of 
1887, 1888, 136 in number. 

Moffett, C. W., Montour, Iowa: Photo portrait of John H. Kagi, of early 
Kansas and Harper's Ferry. 

Montgomery, A., Topeka: Photograph of donor's drawing from Munkacsy's 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 155 

picture of Christ Before Pilate; large crayon portrait of Senator John J. 
Ingalls, executed by donor. 

Mudge, Mrs. B. F., Manhattan; A. H. Thompson, N. S. Goss and F. G. 
Adams, Topeka; J. K. Meade, Wichita; R. J. Brown, Leavenworth, and 
J. D. Parker, Manhattan : Oil-painted portrait of Prof B. F. Mudge, by 
Woodman. 

Newberry, Horace J., Topeka: Monogram of Senate reporters, Legislature 
of 1887. 

Peacock, Mrs. Ida E. : Large crayon portrait of Richard Realf, from the 
engraving accompanying Rossiter Johnson's sketch in Lippincott's Mag- 
azine. 

Peacock, Miss Nina, Topeka: Large crayon portrait of Thomas Brower 
Peacock, executed by donor. 

Ferine, Miss Clara E., Topeka: Cuts representing the school houses of Wa- 
baunsee county, Kansas, in Matt. Thompson's map of the county. 

Ferine, Miss Emma G., Topeka: Cabinet photo portrait of donor. 

Reed, Miss Adele, Westphalia: Cabinet photo portrait of donor. 

Rupe, Mrs. M. L., Clyde : Photo of log cabin in Elk township. Cloud county, 
built in 1865 and occupied by Hon. John B. Rupe and Frank Rupe. 

Salter, Mrs. S. M., Argonia: Portrait of donor, 1887. 

Stanton, Fred. P., Farmwell, Va. : Marble bust of donor, executed by Ho- 
ratio Stone, of Washington, D. C. 

Stout, J. W. & Co., Topeka: Pencil sketch, design of monument to the 
I memory of Gen. U. S. Grant, designed and drawn for the Kansas Grant 

^ Monument Association by W. H. Fernald and George M. Stone, Topeka, 

1887. 

Stringfellow, B. F., Topeka: Large photo portrait of donor; the same, cab- 
inet size. 

Stringham, T. L., Topeka: Bird's-eye view of the western part of Topeka 
and suburbs. 

Swayze, O. K., Topeka: Programme of grand concert, Marshall's Military 
Band, Topeka, Feb. 4, 1888, containing photo portrait of J. B. Marshall, 
director. 

Thompson, Tom E., Howard : Photograph of Elkcounty court house, How- 
ard, 1887. 

Towner, W. E., Topeka: Cabinet-photo portrait of donor. 

Tracy, Robt., St. Joseph, Mo. : Cabinet photo portrait of Maj. Gen. William 
P. Richardson, of the Kansas Territorial Militia, 1855-6; cabinet photo 
portrait of Dr. John H. Stringfellow, Speaker of the first Kansas House 
of Representatives. 

Triplett, C. S., Leoti : Photo group of first officers of Wichita county, Kan- 
sas, elected February 8, 1887 ; photograph of first agricultural display in 
Wichita county, made by Dunham and Barker at Bank of Leoti City, 
1887. 



156 State Historical society. 

Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, O. : Engraved portraits of authors 
of publications of the donors; namely, of Dr. Joseph Ray, J. C. Ridpath, 
A. Schuyler, E. E. White, W. H. McGuffey, H. W. Harvey, Alfred Hol- 
brook, and W. J. Milne, eight portraits. 

Vance, W. O., New Albany, Ind. : Photographic view of school house in 
the mountains of Maryland, used by Captain John Brown as an arsenal, 
also of swivel gun and pike employed by Captain Brown in the Harper's 
Ferry invasion, October 16, 1859. 

Waugh, Rev. Lorenzo, Petaluma, Cal. : Picture of Old John Street (N. Y.) 
M. E. Church, the first in America. 

AVheeler & Teitzel, Junction City: Monogram containing portraits of the 
115 members of the Kansas M. E. Conference, at Junction City, March, 
1887 ; photographic view of the remains of the first Territorial capitol, at 
Pawnee, near Fort Riley, as remaining 1887. 

Wilcox, P. P., Denver, Colo. : Bird's-eye view of Denver, 1887. 

DONORS OF SCRIP, COINS, AND MEDALS. 

Baker, C. C, Topeka: Three-dollar note of the Bullion Bank of Washing- 
ton, D. C, dated July, 1862. 

Banner, A. J., Clifton : Piece of North Carolina Colonial scrip, two shil- 
lings six pence, 1771. 

Bolmar, C. P., North Topeka: A Democratic bronze medal of the Presi- 
dential campaign of 1840, with medallion of President Van Buren on one 
side and on the other side an eagle with shield and motto, "Independent 
Treasury, July 4, 1840." 

Brown, John, jr., Put-in-Bay Island, Ottawa county, Ohio, deposited by him- 
self and the other surviving children of John Brown, of Osawatomie and 
Harper's Ferry: The Golden Medal which was presented in 1874 to Mrs. 
Mary A. Brown, widow of John Brown, by Victor Hugo and others, 
members of a subscription committee in Paris, France; also the original 
letter accompanying the gift signed by the members of the committee; 
also a copy of the letter written by John Brown, jr., on behalf of his 
mother and family, addressed to the committee in acknowledgment of the 
gift. 

Cunningham, E. W., Emporia: Bond No. 25 of School District No. 1, Lyon 
county, Kansas, dated July 1st, 1863, for $100, supposed to be the first 
legal issue of Kansas school-district bonds. 

Darling, Charles W., Utica, N. Y.: A $500 note of the Bank of Monroe, 
Mich., 1835 ; autograph of John Quincy Adams. 

Harbord, J. G., Manhattan: Tippecanoe medal of 1840, showing on one 
side profile bust of Gen. William H. Harrison, surrounded by the words, 
"Maj. Gen. William H. Harrison, born February 9, 1773;" on the other 
side an eagle with Tippecanoe banner. 

Losch, William, Topeka: Coins — Swedish, 1 ore, 1870, copper; French, 
2 of the Third Empire, cinq, centimes, 1856, and dix centimes, 1856, 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 157 

copper; Canadian, one half-penny token, Bank of Upper Canada, 1857, 
copper; German, 1 Kreuzer, 1875, 6 Kreuzer, 1835, 2 copper coins; 1 
pfennig, 1849, 1 do, 1851, 1 do, 1871, 20 do, 1874, first three copper, last 
silver; 1 Kreuzer, 1871, Baden; 1 Sechsling, 1855, Hamburg, copper; 
1 Dreiling, 1855, Hamburg; Russian, 1 K. K. Aesterreichische Scheide- 
munze, 1861; Hungarian, 1 Magyr Kiralyi Valto Penz, 1868; 3 U. S. 
copper cents, 1 1876, 2 1881. 

Patton, David, Atchison: Piece of Continental money, 14 shillings, issue 
of 1775. 

Pratt, E., Cottonwood Falls: Piece of Maryland colonial scrip, denomina- 
tion $200, dated Annapolis, April 10, 1774; also piece of U. S. Conti- 
nental scrip, denomination $50, issued under act of Congress, January 
14, 1779. 

Shepard, William J., Blue Mound : Copper Whig Harrison medal, of the 
campaign of 1840 — on one side scales labeled ''Whigs and Democrats," 
the latter " Weighed in the Balance and Found Wanting." The other 
side, worn smooth, the word "Buren" only remaining. 

Stone, R. C, Piedmont: Claim debt bond of Kansas Territory, No. 
852, $1,000, payable to William Stone, under act for the adjustment and 
payment of claims, approved February 7, 1859, signed b}^ H. J. Strick- 
ler, Auditor, and dated December 1, 1859. 

Walch, C. J., Burden : Coins— 1 U. S. copper cent, 1843; 1 alloy do, 1857; 
1 Canadian five-cent piece, 1883 ; 1 Chinese one-fourth De, 1860. 

WAR RELICS. 

Abbott, J. B., De Soto: English musket found by Col. A. S. Johnson on 
the battle-field of Westport, Mo., and presented by him to Maj. Abbott, 
battle fought Oct. 23, 1864; sword, procured by donor in 1855, from the 
manufacturer at Cabotville, Conn., and used by him through the Kansas 
Territorial troubles and Price's raid ; Border-Ruffian flag which was placed 
in the Hartford, Conn., Atheneum, by James D. Farren, afterward re- 
turned to Mrs. Abbott. 

Ashbaugh, Mrs. Sophia, Topeka: Candlestick of stone or clay, made by Dr. 
A. Ashbaugh while in charge of a small-pox hospital at Paola, Kansas, 
during the War of the Rebellion. 

Kansas Republican State Convention, July, 1888, Topeka, by resolution: 
Gavel made from block of wood from battle-field of Chickamauga, Tenn., 
with bullet imbedded ; the handle made of wood from the battle-field of 
Stone river, Tenn.; (presented to the Convention by Hon. W. E. Richey, 
of Harveyville, Kansas.) 

McCarthy, Timothy, Topeka: Antique Colt's navy revolver, found on 
farm of donor near Fort Earned, 1887. 

Prentiss, Dr. S. B., Lawrence : The leaden bullet extracted by donor from 
the body of John Jones, who was shot and killed by Pro-Slavery men at 
Blanton's bridge, Douglas county, Monday, May 19, 1856. 



168 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Richardson, J. W., Marquette : Biscuit presented by the wife of a Confederate 
soldier to J. B. Mock, a Union soldier marching through North Carolina. 

Ritchie, Mrs. Hannah, Topeka: The sword and gun of Gen. John Ritchie, 
used by him during the period of his service in the army in the War of 
the Rebellion. 

Washburn, A., Topeka: Powderhorn made in October, 1775, by Nathan 
Washburn, a Connecticut Revolutionary soldier, while in camp at Rox- 
bury, Mass., during the investment of Boston. The horn was given by 
Mr. Washburn to his grandson, the donor. 

Wasson, W. A., Lane, Kansas: Fragment of the vest, with button attached, 
of Capt. Nick L. Beuter, Company C, 12th Kansas Infantry, who was 
shot and killed near Hot Springs, Arkansas, April 2, 1864. 

Watkins, Mrs. Lititia V., Barnard: Revolving pistol No. 2769, the prop- 
erty of Col. James Montgomery during the Pro-Slavery troubles in Kan- 
sas Territory, and during the War of the Rebellion. 

DONORS OF MISCELLANEOUS CONTRIBUTIONS AND RELICS. 

Abbott, Jas. B., De Soto: Blanks relating to payment of Quantrill raid 

claims, appropriation of 1887. 
Adams, F. G., Topeka: Complimentary ticket and badge given to members 

of the Legislative excursion to Wichita, Feb. 18-19, 1887; programme, 

ticket, and badge, Northwest Kansas Editorial Association, May 23-25, 

1888. 
Adams, H. J., Topeka: Shawnee county, Kansas, election tickets, fall of 

1885. 
Barnes, J. S., Sec, Phillipsburg: Invitation cards to Phillips County Fair, 

1887 and 1888. 
Barnes, W. H., Sec, Independence: Cards, circulars, &c, Montgomery 

County Fair, 1876, 1880-1887. 
Bayley, Samuel, Hartford: Two flint-scrapers, one spear-head, and five 

fragments of Indian pottery, found sec 5, T. 20, R. 14 E., California 

township, Coffey county, Kansas. 
Beezley, J. F., Sec, Girard: Posters, &c, Crawford County Fairs, 1878- 

1887, except 1882-3. 
Bethany College, Lindsborg: Invitation card, commencement exercises, 

June, 1887. 
Botkin, Theo., Attica: Fragment of mastodon's tooth, found at Attica, five 

and a half feet below the surface, April, 1887. 
Bowes, George W., Topeka : Book of blank notes of Topeka Bank and Sav- 
ings Institution. 
Bradlee, Rev. C. D., Boston, Mass. : Card of Title Insurance Company. 
Carson, Hampton L., Sec, Philadelphia: Invitation card to Constitutional 

Centennial Celebration, Philadelphia, September 15-17, 1887. 
Carter, Joe H., Lexington: Sandstone pebble, form of linch-pin for ox-bow 

key, found in bed of Bluff creek, Clark county, Kansas, 1887. 



Sixth biennial Re poet. 159 

Clarke, W. B., Kansas City, Mo. : Copy of memorandum book and calendar 

of the Merchants' National Bank, Kansas City. 
Crosby, D. R., Minneapolis : Premium lists, posters, etc., of the Ottawa County 

Fair, 1888. 
Cuthbertson, M. D., Voltaire : Badge worn at first annual reunion of the old 

soldiers of Sherman county, Kansas, at Voltaire, September 12-14, 1887; 

and badge worn at the first reunion of the soldiers of Sherman county, 

Kansas, Eustis, September 1-3, 1887. 
Daniel, S. A., Eskridge : Election ticket used in the first city election, Esk- 

ridge, Kansas, 1887 — candidates all women. 
Elliott, L. R., Manhattan : Handbill, dated April 25, 1887, and extra of 

the Leonardville (Riley county) Monitor, April 26, 1887, mementoes of 

the Rock Island Railroad bond vote in Riley county. 
Fast, Henry H., Hillsboro : Plate for the printing of cloth, made and used 

by the grandfather of donor, in Russia, as early as 1775. 
Fee, S., Wamego: Stamped envelope of 1876, United States postage 3 

cents, engraving showing post-rider in 1776, and mail car in 1876. 
Fisher, J. R., Topeka: Section of oak tree with branch so bent and grown 

into the trunk as to form a loop, or looped-handle. 
Frankey, J. F., Dodge City, Kansas: Card of invitation to the laying of 

the corner-stone of the Presbyterian College at Dodge City, April 5, 

1888. 
Goodnow, Prof. I. T., Manhattan : Broadside proclamation of the Executive 

Committee of Kansas, under the Topeka Constitution, dated November 

24, 1855, giving notice of the election to be held December 15, 1855, on 

the adoption of the Constitution, signed by J. H. Lane, Chairman, and J. 

K. Goodin, Secretary. 
Hale, George D., Topeka: Ancient vase of pottery, procured by H. E. 

Nickerson from a mound in section 33, township 11, range 7, east, on the 

banks of the Little river, Poinsett county, Arkansas, 1887. 
Hubert, Mrs. A. G., Topeka: Piece of granite from Texas State capitol, 

Austin. 
Hulbert, E. W., Secretary, Fort Scott: Posters of Bourbon county fair 

1887. 
Kenea, J. P., and Ed. C. Lane, La Cygne : Calendars of the La Cygne Jour- 
nal for 1887—8 cards. 
Latimer, J. W., Pleasanton: Posters of Pleasanton (Linn county) fair, 

1887. 
McClelland, W. B., Bird City: Poster Bird City Driving Park Association, 

1887. 
McConnell, W. K., Greenleaf : Card of invitation to Washington County 

Fair, 1888. 
McLain, F. E., Sec, Hays City : Posters of the fair of the Western Kansas 

Agricultural Association, Hays City, 1886. 
—11 



160 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



Magill, J. S., Sec, Marysville: Posters of meetings of Marshall county 
pioneers at Marysville, Sept. 12, 1888. 

Meade, J. R., Wichita: Piece of pottery found by donor in 1885, in the 
western part of New Mexico, thirty miles north of Grant station, on the 
A. & P. Rly., and given by him to the Society Feb. 19, 1887. 

Jklills, T. B., Las Vegas, N. M. : Poster relative to lot sale in Las Vegas, 
August 4, 1887. 

Mitchell, David, McPherson: Circulars, &c., of stock sale. May 4, 1887. 

Mitchell, Joshua, Seneca: Posters of the Nemaha County Fair, 1888. 

Moon, E. G., Sec, Topeka: Card of invitation to State Fair, Topeka, 1888 ; 
posters, cards, Ac, of the same. 

Moore, Milton R., Topeka: Scrap-book containing editorial notices of the 
Kansas Magazine, Topeka, 1872-1873. 

Munz, A., Ogden: Two flint spear-heads found six miles north of Fort 
Riley, in bed of Three-Mile creek, Riley county, Kansas. 

Murdock, M. M., Wichita: Pocket tally-sheets of Kansas Republican Con- 
vention, Wichita, July 25, 1888, and card containing the electoral vote of 
1884. 

Nichols, C. D., Sec, Columbus: Programs and posters of the Cherokee 
county fair, 1887. 

Patrick, A. G., Valley Falls : Copies of donor's political broadsides, Nov. 
1887. 

Pope Manufacturing Co., Boston, Mass: Donor's bicycle calendar for 1888. 

Reinch, A., Lawrence: Skeleton of an Osage Indian, exhumed near Wal- 
nut river, Cowley county, Kansas. 

Richards, J. H., Wichita, Kansas : Pass over St. L. Ft. S. & Wichita Rail- 
road, 1887, design of sunflower engraved thereon. 

Sims, A. C, Winona: Specimen of nickel ore from mine near Winona, Lo- 
gan county, Kansas. 

Snow, William M., Manhattan : Scrap-book made by Dr. Amory Hunting 
of Manhattan, containing newspaper clippings relating to Kansas Terri- 
torial affairs. 

Stewart, Mrs. M., Wichita: Silk badge worn by the Wichita delegation to 
San Francisco, Cal., at the 20th National Encampment G. A. R., August, 

1886, with grasshopper and sunflower painted therein by donor, 
rhacher, T. D., Topeka: Card of invitation of the Irish National League, 

to attend the meeting at the Grand Opera House, Topeka, April 12th, 

1887, addressed by Hon. John J. Ingalls and Hon. Thomas Ryan. 
Thomas, Chester, jr., Topeka: Posters, cards, circulars, etc, Kansas State 

Fair, 1887. 
Van Hoesen, I. N., Sec, Lawrence: Card of invitation, posters, cards, etc., 

of the Western National Fair, Bismarck Grove, 1888. 
Vance, D. J., Sec, Mankato: Card of invitation to Jewell County Fair, 

1888. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 161 

Walch, C. I., Burden : One flint arrow-head. 

Wilson, W. J., Secretary, Winfield: Copies of circulars, postal cards, 
etc., of Cowley county fair, Winfield, 1887; 37 posters, cards, blanks, 
badges, etc., of Cowley county fair, 1888. 

Worrall, Isaac W., Pratt, Kansas: Carving of peach pit, made to repre- 
sent an Indian head. 

DONORS OF SINGLE NEWSPAPERS. 

Abbott, James B., De Soto : Supplement to Hartford (Conn.) Post, of Jan- 
uary 5, 1887, containing brief biographical mention of the members of 
the Connecticut Legislature of 1887; Hartford Post of January 29, 1887, 
containing biographical sketch of Mark Howard, President National 
Fire Insurance Company; Weekly Underwriter, Hartford, supplement, 
January 15, 1887, containing biographical sketches of Hartford under- 
writers. 

Adair, Pev. S. L., Osawatomie: Thirty-two copies miscellaneous newspapers. 

Adams, Frank S., Waterville: Waterville Telegraph, February 4, 1887, 
containing biographical sketches of Waterville business men. 

Adams, J. W., Topeka : Copy of the Union and Advertiser, Kochester, N. Y., 
March 23, 1888, containing a review of the history and progress of 
Rochester. 

Andrews & Payne, Salina: Salina (Kansas) Republican, illustrated edi- 
tion. May, 1888. 

Anthony, Daniel R., Leavenworth : Supplement to the Leavenworth Times, 
1888, containing press comments on donor's candidacy for Governor. 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, General Offices, Topeka: Copy of 
the Madagascar Times, Antananarivo, November 12, 1887. 

Ball, Dr. J. Parker, Coldwater: Comanche County Sun, Coldwater, Nos. 1 
and 2, September 10 and 29, 1888. 

Barnes, M. E. and M. J. Packard, Atlanta, Ga. : Copies of Spellman Mes- 
senger, November and December, 1887. 

Bradlee, Rev. Dr. C. D., Boston, Mass.: Unitarian Record, Chelmsford, 
Mass., February, 1887, and of the Southern Letter, February, 1887, Tus- 
kegee, Ala.; Boston Evening Traveller, June 11, 1888, containing donor's 
poem, "In Memoriam," to Rev. James Freeman Clarke; copy of the 
Christian Register, Boston, December 1, 1887; copy of Our Best Words, 
Shelbyville, III, 1888. 

Burleigh, Rev. C. H., Cheney: The Conference Daily, Winfield, March 
10-15, 1887, five newspapers. 

Bushell, W., Camden, N. J. : Copy of the North American, Phila., Sept. 
16, 1887, containing fac-simile of the first printed copy of the constitu- 
tion of the United States. 

Caldwell, E. F., Lawrence: Copy of the Southern Kansan, January, 1887. 

Call Publishing Co., Wichita: Copy of Wichita Daily Call, Feb. 19, 1887, 



162 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 

giving list of persons attending Legislative excursion to Wichita, Feb. 
18-19, 1887, with proceedings of entertainment, while in that city. 

Cameron, Hugh, Lawrence: Copy of the Journal of United Labor, Phila., 
March 19, 1887. 

Chandler, Dr. Daniel L., Ogden : Twenty-eight copies of Herald of Free- 
dom, Lawrence, K. T., 1857; 2 copies of the Topeka Tribune, Jan. 12 
and June 6, 1857 ; copy Kansas Freeman, Topeka, Nov. 14, 1855 ; copy 
of Lecompton Union, Feb. 21, 1857 ; copy of New York Republican, 
Nov. 22, 1856. 

Christian Cynosure, Chicago, Publishers of: Issues of March 31, 1887, con- 
taining articles relating to John Brown, written by Hon. S. C. Pomeroy, 
Rev. C. C. Foote and others. 

Clark, Arthur, Leavenworth : Copy of the Truth-Teller, a half-sheet news- 
paper, Topeka, February 24, 1862. 

Clarke, Sylvester H., Clyde, N. Y.: Copy of "Social Visitor, Magazine," 
containing biographical sketch of W. C. Quantrill and account of Law- 
rence raid, August 21, 1863. 

Cooper, F. N. and Co., Lyons : Lyons Daily Democrat, Sept. 29, 1887, de- 
scriptive of Lyons and Rice county, Kansas. 

Corey, Wells, Editor Quid-Nunc, Wellington : Copy of New Year's edition, 
Jan. 1, 1888. 

Criswell, Ralph L., Gove City : Copy of the Gove City Advocate, April 
2, 1888. 

Darling, C. W., Utica, N. Y. : Fac-simile number of the Utica Morning 
Herald, 1887. 

Davis, Charles S., Junction City: Conference Daily Tribune, Junction 
City, March 17-22, 1887, 5 newspapers. 

Dignon, T. D., Topeka: Copy Ulster County Gazette, Princeton, N. Y., 
January 4, 1880, (reprint), containing account of the death of Gen. 
George Washington. 

Dixon, J. J. A. T., Bunker Hill : Copies of the Bunker Hill News of No- 
vember 26, December 10, 17, 24 and 31, 1886. 

Easley, C. G., South Hutchinson: Saturday Review, South Hutchinson, 
Kansas, October 1, 1887, descriptive edition. 

Elliott & Rosser, Coffey ville: Six copies of Southern Kansas Journal and 
Land Buyer's Guide, Coffey ville, March, 1887. 

Elliott, L. R., Manhattan: Copies of the Manhattan Methodist, October 
and December, 1886; Assembly Herald, Ottawa, June 22 and July 3, 
1886; Kansas Banner, Parsons, Y. M. C. A., September 21, 1886; copy 
of the Y. M. C. A. Argus, vol. 2, No. 1, first quarter, 1888; and The 
Crank, Gueda Springs, September 11, 1886. 

Foote, A. E., Philadelphia, Pa. : Philadelphia Inquirer, containing lecture 
of donor on the minerals of the United States. 

Garrison, Francis J., Boston, Mass.: Copies of The Liberator, Boston, 



Sixth Biennial Re poet. 163 

March 21 and December 5, 1845, and March 13, 1846, to supply de- 
ficiencies in files. 

Goodnow, Prof. I. T., Manhattan: Two numbers of the Salt Lake Tribune, 
Utah, March 13 and 14, 1888; copy of Jonathan's Whittlings of War, 
New York, April 22, 1854; copy of the New York Amulet, March 1, 
1831; copy of the Brownsville (Nebraska) Advertiser of September 12, 
1867; copy of the Portland, Maine Advertiser, May 18, 1827; copy of 
"Boston, 1630-1880," dated September 17, 1880; forty numbers of the 
Oxford Observer, Paris, Maine, 1826-1832; ninety-two numbers of the 
Oxford (Maine) Democrat, 1856-1860; one hundred and twenty-three 
numbers of Zion's Herald, Boston, Mass., 1877-1887; eight numbers of 
the American Agriculturist, 1864-1872; five copies of the Norway 
(Maine) Advertiser, 1845-1850; thirty-two numbers of the New York 
Weekly Witness, 1872-1876; eighteen numbers of the Land Owner, 
Chicago, 111., 1874-1876; one hundred and two numbers of the Globe- 
Democrat, St. Louis, Mo., 1862-1880; ten numbers of the New York 
Independent, 1870-1875; fifty-two numbers, daily and weekly, of the 
Chicago Inter-Ocean, 1885-1887; twenty-three numbers of the Hearth 
and Home, Washington, D. C, 1884-1887; forty-two numbers of the 
New York Weekly Tribune, 1870-1885; eight numbers of the Herald of 
Health, New York, 1865-1867; forty-four numbers of the Advance, 
Chicago, 111., 1870-1875; one hundred and sixteen numbers of the To- 
peka Weekly Capital, 1883-1887; eight numbers of the Kansas Farmer, 
vol. 1, 1863-1864, and thirty-two numbers of the same, 1865-1872; fifty- 
four numbers of the Kansas Methodist, Topeka, 1881-1888; nine 
numbers of the Literary Review, Agricultural College, Manhattan, 
February to December, 1872; copy of the Emporia News, July 8, 1865 ; 
thirteen numbers of the Manhattan (Kansas) Express, 1869; fifty-eight 
numbers of the Manhattan Republic, 1884-1887; twenty numbers of the 
Manhattan Independent, 1862-1867; eighteen numbers of the Manhat- 
tan Beacon, 1872; one hundred and twenty-four numbers of the Man- 
hattan Nationalist, 1874—1882; five numbers of the Kansas M. E. 
Conference Daily, Topeka, March, 1888; one hundred and fifty-one mis- 
cellaneous Kansas newspapers, 1873-1887; two hundred and forty-one 
numbers miscellaneous newspapers of other States ; Kansas City Times, 
November 25, 1879, containing biography of Prof B. F. Mudge; 1,457 
in all. 

Greer, Ed. P., Winfield: Copy of Winfield Courier, June 8, 1887, contain- 
ing illustrations of Winfield statistics,' &c. 

HoflTman, Rev. R. A., Downs : Ellsworth Daily Democrat, March 24-28, 
1887, containing proceedings of Northwest Kansas M. E. Conference, 
1887, 4 newspapers. 

Hughes, Mrs. Thomas, Albuquerque, N. M.: Santa Fe Daily New Mexican, 
February 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 1887, containing matter relating to the New 
Mexico Legislature then in session. 



164 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Jerome, Frank E., Russell and Wilson: Copies of Wakefield (England) 
Express, March 19, 1887, and Manchester Courier of May 3 and 5, and 
June 6 and 11, 1887, containing an account of the Queen's jubilee; 
Copy of the Ulster County Gazette, Kingston, N. Y., January 4, 1800, 
(reprint ;) Copies of the Gleaner and Luzern Advertiser, Wilkesbarre, Pa., 
October 11 and 18, and November 1, 15, 22, and 29, 1811. 

Lee, Ed. G., Frisco : Morton County ( Kansas) Democrat, Frisco, February 
5, 1887, containing paragraph relating to valuable historical papers in 
possession of Judge Frybarger, Syracuse, Kansas. 

Litts, L. H., & Co., Abilene: Illustrated Abilene Reflector, April 12, 1887; 
two copies. 

Lykins, W. H. R., Kansas City, Mo. : Copy of Agassiz Companion, Wyan- 
dotte, October, 1887, containing article written by donor on Indian names. 

McCrary, George W., Kansas City, Mo.: Copy of Our Best Words, Shel- 
byvilie. 111., April 15, 1887. 

Maffet, George W., Anthony: Copies of Anthony (Kansas) Republican, 
vol. 9, Nos. 38 and 39, boom edition, 1888; 2. 

Marston, C. W., Cedar Junction: Copies Cherokee (I. T.) Advocate, Tahle- 
quah, August 14, 1885, and Indian Chieftain, Vinita, I. T., January 27 
and February 3, 1887. 

Martin, G. W., Junction City: Junction City Union, February 12, 1887, 
containing a paper written by Lemuel Knapp, dated December 23, 1856, 
giving his experiences at Pawnee City in 1854-55. 

Menager, E. S. and S. A., Menager, Kansas : Copy of "Cincinnati, 1788 and 
1888," a centennial newspaper. 

Mueller, Ernest, Topeka: Copy of the Berliner Tageblatt, March 16, 1888, 
official paper of the German empire, containing an account of the life, 
death and funeral of Emperor William, proclamations, etc. 

Miller, J. H., Holton : Copy of the Normal Advocate, Holton, May 1, 1887. 

Mills, T. B., & Son, Las Vegas, N. M., Investors' Review, vol. 1, No. 1, Oc- 
tober, 1887. 

Nixon, Thomas, Wellington : Newcastle Weekly Chronicle, England, Au- 
gust 29, 1885, containing an account of Washington Hall, at Washing- 
ton, Eng., formerly the property of George Washington's ancestors. 

Olney, Henry C, Gunnison, Colo. : Copy of Rocky Mountain News, Denver, 
holiday edition, December 29, 1887. 

Owens & Mendenhall, Dodge City : Newspapers containing a business re- 
view of the products and progress of Dodge City, Kansas, 1888. 

Ozias, J. W., Ottawa or Wichita: Northwestern Christian Advocate, April 
30, 1862, and Buchanan County Bulletin, Independence, Iowa, Oct. 29, 1869. 

Pratt, Captain R. H., Carlisle, Penn.: Copies of "Eadle Keatah Toh," vol. 
I., No. 2., and of the Morning Star, vol. V., No. 2, publications of Indian 
Industrial School, Carlisle. 

Schulein, S., Fort Scott: Cuttings from newspapers relative to commercial 
agencies. 



Sixth Biennial re poet. 165 

Swarr, D. M., Lancaster, Pa. : Fac-simile copy of the Philadelphia Public 
Ledger, vol. I., No. 1, March 25, 1836; copies of the Philadelpia Press, 
of March 13 and 14, 1888, containing account of the eastern blizzard of 
the 12th and 13th; copies of Der Volks-Freund, Lancaster, Pa., of Dec. 
29, 1835 and Jan. 26 and March 1, 1836; copy of the Manheim (Pa.) 
Monitor, April 5, 1888. 

Thayer, Eli, Worcester, Mass. : Four copies of Boston Herald, April 24, 
1887, containing articles by donor, relating to saving Kansas to freedom. 
Two newspaper clippings relating to the work of the New England Emi- 
grant Aid Society, articles by donor. 

Thompson, Tom E., Howard : Copy of Elk County Courant, Elk City, June 
17, 1874; copies of Elk County Herald, Howard, Kas., vols. 1 to 9, Aug. 
20 to Oct. 14, 1881 ; the same of the Howard City Beacon, Nos. 3 to 22, 
July 24 to Nov. 27, 1875, and six duplicates. 

Valentine, D. A., Clay Center: Times, Clay Center, March 31, 1887, con- 
taining views of that city in 1877 and 1886. 

Walker, John, Hunnewell: Copy of the Sentinel, Kichmond, Va., March 
14, 1865, containing message of President Jeff. Davis to the Confederate 
Congress, and other matters of historical interest. 

Waugh, Rev. Lorenzo: Biggs (Cal.) Argus, Feb. 24, 1887, containing per- 
sonal mention of donor, and his moral work among the children ; copy 
of the Christian Advocate, N. Y., May 21, 1888, containing proceedings 
of the Twenty-fifth General Conference, and a letter of donor; copy of 
Chico (Cal.) Chronicle, Feb. 17, 1887, giving paragraph relating to Rev. 
Lorenzo Waugh, also to J. B. Robinson and W. B. Mott, early Califor- 
nians; Sacramento (Cal.) Daily Bee, immigration edition, 1887. 

Wilcox, P. P., Denver, Colo.: Copies of Denver Republican of Jan. 30, 
1887, containing an account of stage-robbing in June, 1881, near Lake 
City, Colorado. 

Wilder, D. W., Hiawatha: Daily Brown County World, Oct., 1887, Fair 
edition. 

Willson, H. C, Waterville: Waterville Telegraph, Jan. 7, 14, 21, 28, and 
Feb. 11, 1887, containing biographical sketches of Waterville business men. 

DONORS OF NEWSPAPER FILES. 
The following is a list of newspaper files and volumes of periodicals do- 
nated, other than those received in current issues : 

Adair, Rev. S. L., Osawatomie: Files of the New York Evangelist, from 
January 9, 1845, to February 11, 1847; of the Advance, Chicago, for 
1873 to 1875, 1877, 1879, 1884, and partial files for 1876, 1878, 1882 and 
1883; of the Sunday School Times, Philadelphia, for 1879, 1880, 1884, 
1885, 1886, and partial files for 1878 and 1883; and of the National Sun- 
day School Teacher, Chicago, for 1869-1881, and partial files for 1868 
and 1882 — thirty-six files in all. 
Angell, George T., Boston, Mass. : Files of " Our Dumb Animals," Boston, 
from July, 1882, to January, 1885. 



166 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Baker, Dr. W. S., Topeka: Files of the New York Semi- Weekly Tribune 
for 1886 and 1887. 

Baker, F. P., Topeka: Four files of the Weekly Commonwealth, 1883, 1886 
and 1887; two files of the Daily Commonwealth, 1884 ; four files of the 
Daily Commonwealth, 1887; files of the Daily Commonwealth, Topeka, 
January 2, to December 30, 1883, and from July 10 to December 30, 1883 ; 
the same of the Weekly Commonwealth, January 1, 1881, to December 
28. 1882, and from July 19 to December 27, 1883; sixteen files in all. 

Bawden, W. J., Fort Scott : Files of the Fort Scott Monitor, weekly, for 1868 
and 1869. 

Beers, Dr. G. L., Topeka: Files of the Christian Union, New York, from 
June 17, 1886, to June 30, 1887; New York Independent, from June 17, 

1886, to December 30, 1887; The Christian Advocate, N. Y., from June 
24 to December 30, 1886. 

Bell, G. H., Battle Creek, Mich. : File of the Fireside Teacher, Battle Creek, 
from May, 1886, to April, 1887. 

Burleigh, C. H., Cheney : Two files of Southwestern Kansas Conference Daily, 
Winfield, March 10 to 15, 1887. 

Campbell, M. M., North Topeka: File of the Phonographic Magazine, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, 1887. 

Evans, Mrs. A. R., Topeka: File of The Delineator, N. Y., 1886. 

Goodnow, Prof I. T., Manhattan : Two files of the Oxford Observer, Paris, 
Maine, from July 8, 1824, to June, 1826 ; 6 files of the Oxford Demo- 
crat, 1871-1876; 6 files of Zion's Herald, Boston, Mass., 1868, 1869, 
1870,1879,1880,1883; 5 files of the Great Southwest, St. Louis, Mo., 
vols. 1, 2, 3, 6, and 7, 1874-1880; 2 files of the American Agriculturist, 
1860-1861 ; 2 files of the Norway (Maine) Advertiser, January 2, 1872 
to December 31, 1875 ; 4 files of the Land Owner, Chicago, 111., 1870- 
1873; 8 files of the Kansas Farmer, 1865-1872; file of the New York 
Independent, 1874; 6 files of the New York Weekly Tribune, 1879-1884 ; 
2 files of the Advance, Chicago, 111., 1872 and 1873; 3 files of the Man- 
hattan Kansas Express, 1860, 1861, 1862; file of the Manhattan Inde- 
pendent, 1864; 2 files of the Manhattan Beacon, 1873 and 1874; 11 files 
of the Manhattan Nationalist, 1871, 1873, 1875, 1878, 1879, 1883, 1884- 
1887 ; sixty-two files in all. 

Holbrook, E. A., Chicago, 111.: File of the Western Trail, Rock Island 
route, 1886 and 1887. 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. : File of the University circular 
from December, 1879, to August, 1882. 

McLaren, J. D., Kansas City, Mo. : File of the Normal Institute Record, 
Minneapolis, Kansas, July 15 to August 9, 1878; Kansas Educational 
Journal, Emporia and Topeka, file from June, 1871, to April, 1873. 

Moore, Robert R., Topeka : File of Dye's Government Counterfeit Detector, 

1887, 1888. • 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 



167 



Rank, D. H., Publishing Company, Indianapolis, Ind. : Millstone and Corn 

Miller, files for 1884 and 1885. 
Robinson, Mrs. E. S., Topeka : Files of the Evangelical Magazine and Gospel 

Advocate, Utica, N. Y., vols. 4, 5 and 9, 1833, 1834 and 1838, duplicate 

of 1833; files of Utica, N. Y., Evangelical Magazine, vols. 2 and 3, April 

5, 1828, to December 26, 1829; five files in all. 
Smalley, Ellis, Council Grove : Files of the Diamond, 1840-1842, a monthly 

periodical published in New York in the interest of radical reform. 
St. John, E., Rock Island Railway, Chicago, 111.: Files of the Western 

Trail, from May, 1886, to April, 1888. 
Swayze, Oscar K., Topeka: File of the Topeka Daily Blade from January 

7, 1875, to February 17, 1876. 
Thompson, Tom. E., Howard: File of the Winfield Courier from February 

1, 1873, to May 29, 1874. 
Tincher, G. W., Topeka: File of the Temperance Rural, Cherokee, Kansas 

1878 and 1879. 

BOUND NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 

The following is a statement of bound newspaper files and bound volumes 
of periodicals in the library of the Society, November 20, 1888, including 
the volumes which become complete December 31, 1888, numbering 7,990 
volumes ; of which 5,751 are of Kansas, and 2,239 are of other States and 
countries, and of which 2,004 have been added during the two years covered 
by this report. (Volumes not otherwise described are of weekly newspapers.) 

BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS. 



Newspapers. 



lola Register 

Allen County Independent, lola. 

Allen County Courant, lola 

Allen County Democrat, lola 

Democrat-Courant, lola 

Humboldt Union 

Inter-State, Humboldt 

Independent Press, Humboldt.... 

The Humboldt Herald 

Moran Herald 



ALLEN COUNTY. 



ANDERSON COUNTY. 

Garnett Weekly Journal 

Garnett Plaindealer 

Anderson County Republican, Garnett 

Republican-Plaindealer, Garnett 

Anderson County Democrat, Garnett 

Garnett Eagle 

The Greeley Tribune 

The Greeley News ^ 

The Colony Free Press 

Westphalia Times 

Kincaid Kronicle 

The Kincaid Dispatch 



ATCHISON COUNTY. 

Squatter Sovereign, Atchison 

Freedom's Champion, (1861 lacking,) Atchison 

Atchison Daily Free Press 

Atchison Weekly Free Press, (four files each of 1866 and 1867,). 
Champion and Press (weekly), Atchison 



Years, 



1873-1888 


16 


1879,1880 


1 


1881-1888 


5 


1886-1888 


1 


1888 


1 


1876-1888 


13 


1878-1888 


9 


1882 


1 


1887-1888 


1 


1885-1888 


3 


1876-1888 


13 


1876-1884 


9 


1883,1884 


1 


1884-1888 


5 


1885-1887 


2 


1886-1888 


2 


1880,1881 


1 


1881-1888 


7 


1882-1888 


7 


1885-1888 


3 


1886,1887 


2 


1888 


1 


1856,1857 


1 


1857-1863 


4 


1865-1868 


7 


1866-1868 


3 


1868-1873 


4 



168 



State histobical Society. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continued. 



Newtpapers. 




ATCHISON covNTY —concluded. 

Atchison Daily Champion 

Atchison Weekly Champion, < lacking from 1878-1885,) 

Kansas Zeitiing, Atchison, (duplicates of vol. 1,) 

Atchison Union, (broken files,) 

Atchison Patriot, daily, ( from July, 1876, to July, 1879, lacking,)... 

Atchison Patriot (weekly) 

Atchison Courier.. , 

Atchison Globe (daily) 

Atchisonian, Atchison 

Atchison Banner 

The New West, Atchison 

The Sunday Morning Call, Atchison 

Atchison Telegraph 

Kansas Staats-Anzeiger, Atchison 

Atchison Journal (daily) 

Western Mercury, Atchison 

Atchison Sunday Morning Sermon 

The Western Recorder, Atchison 

The Trades-Union, Atchison ! 

The Atchison Times 

The Prairie Press, Lancaster 

Messachorean (monthly), Atchison , 

Muscotah Record, (missing from August, 1886, to January, 1887,)., 
The Effingham Times 



BARBER COUNTY. 

Barber County Mail, Medicine Lodge 

Medicine Lodge Cresset 

The Barber County Index, Medicine Lodge 

Medicine Ix)dge Chief 

Hazelton Express 

The Kiowa Herald, New Kiowa 

The Kiowa Journal 

Sharon News 

The Union, Sun City 

The .F.tna Clarion 

Kansas Prairie Dog, Lake City 

The Lake City Bee 



Great Bend Register 

Inland Tribune, (Jreat Bend 

Arkansas Valley Democrat, Great Bend. 

Kansas Volksfreund, Great Bend 

Barton County Democrat, Great Bend.... 

Daily (iraphic, (Jreat Bend 

The Ellinwood P^xpress 

Pawnee Rock I.«aaer 

The Echo, Hoisington 

Claflin Gazette 



BARTON COUNTY. 



BOURBON COUNTY. 

Fort Scott Daily Monitor 

Fort Scott Weekly Monitor, (1870-1876 lackine.V.!....... 

Fort Scott Pioneer. * ' 



Camp's Emigrant's Guide, Fort Scott. 

New Century, Fort Scott 

The Fort .Scott Herald 

Republican- Record, Fort Scott 

Herald and Record, Fort Scott 

Evening Herald, dally, Fort Scott 

Medical Index, monthly. Fort Scott... 

The Banner, Fort Scott 

Fort Scott Dally Tribune 

Fort Scott Weekly Tribune 

Kansas Staats-Zeitung, Fort Scott 

The Fort Scott Union 

Bronson Pilot "^ 

The Fulton Independent .'.'. 

The Telephone. Uniontown 

The Garland Gleaner 



Hiawatha Dispatch 

The Hiawatha World 

Kansas Herald, Hiawatha ... 
The Kansas Sun, Hiawatha., 



BROWN COUNTY. 



1876-1888 

1873-1888 

1857,1858 

1859-1861 

1876-18S8 

1874-1888 

1876-1879 

1878-1888 

1877 

1878,1879 

1878-1880 

1882,1883 

1882 

1881-1885 

1881,1882 

1884-1886 

1884 

1884 

1885,1886 

1888 

1888 

1888 

1886-1887 

1887,1888 



1878,1879 
1879-1888 
1881-1888 
1886-1888 
1884-1888 
1884-1888 
1886-1888 
1884-1886 
1884-1888 
1885-1887 
1885-1887 



1876-1888 
1876-1888 
1877-1882 
1878,1879 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1878-1888 
1886-1888 



1888 



1880-1888 
1867-1888 
1876-1878 
1877 
1877,1878 
1878-1882 
1879-1882 
1882-1884 
1882-1885 
1881-1884 
1882-1884 
1884-1888 
1884-1888 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1884-1888 
1884-1888 
1886-1888 
1886,1887 



1876-1882 
1882-1888 
1876-1883 
1879,1880 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 



169 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




BROWN COUNTY — concluded. 

Weekly Messenger, Hiawatha 

The Kansas Democrat, Hiawatha 

Free Press, Hiawatha 

Everest Reflector , 

Horton Headlight 

Horton Daily Headlight , 



BUTLER COUNTY. 



Augusta Republican, (1875-1880 lacking,) 

Southern Kansas Gazette, Augusta 

Augusta Advance .' 

Augusta Electric Light 

Augusta Weekly Journal 

Walnut Valley Times, El Dorado 

Daily Walnut Valley Times, El Dorado 

El Dorado Press 

El Dorado Daily Republican 

El Dorado Republican 

Butler County Democrat, El Dorado 

The El Dorado Eagle 

The New Enterprise, Douglass 

Douglass Index , 

The Douglass Tribune 

Leon Indicator, (missing from February to September, 1887,). 

The Leon Quill 

The Benton Reporter 

The Towanda Herald 

The Brainerd Sun 

Latham Journal 

Latham Signal 

The Beaumont Business 

Potwin Messenger 

The Brainerd Ensign 



1882-1884 
1884-1888 
1887,1888 
1885,1886 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 



1873-1883 
1876-1886 
1883,1884 
1884-1886 

1888 
1874-1888 
1887-1888 
1877-1883 
1885-1888 
1883-1888 
1881-1888 

1882 
1879,1880 
1880-1883 
1884-1888 
1880-1888 
1886,1887 
1884,1885 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1885,1886 
1887,1888 
1886-1888 

1888 
1887,1888 



CHASE COUNTY. 

Chase County Courant, Cottonwood Falls 

Chase County Leader, Cottonwood Falls 

Strong City Independent 

Chase County Republican, Strong City 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY. 

Chautauqua Journal, Sedan 

The Chautauqua County Times, Sedan 

Sedan Times 

Sedan Times-Journal 

The Border Slogan, Sedan 

The Graphic, Sedan 

Chautauqua News, Peru 

The Peru Times 

The Weekly Call, Peru 

The Chautauqua Springs Spy 

Chautauqua Springs Mail 

The Cedar Vale Star 



CHEROKEE COUNTY. 

Republican-Courier, Columbus 

The Columbus Courier 

Columbus Democrat 

Border Star, Columbus 

The Columbus Videtie 

The Times, Columbus 

Kansas Bee-Keeper, Columbus 

Lea's Columbus Advocate 

The Daily Advocate, Columbus 

The Daily News and The Weekly News, Columbus 

The Expository, Girard and Columbus 

The Sprig of Myrtle (monthly), Columbus 

The Kansas Prohibitionist, Columbus 

Baxter Springs Republican 

The Times, Baxter Springs 

Baxter Springs News 

Baxter Springs Delta 

Galena Miner 

Galena Miner (second) 

Short Creek Weekly Banner, Galena 

The Galena Messenger 

Short Creek Republican, Galena , 



1874 


-1888 


1875 


-1888 


1881 


-1887 


1887,1888 


1875-1884 


1878 


-1881 


1882 


-1884 


1885 


-1888 


1883 


,1884 


1884 


-1888 


1877 


-1881 


1886,1887 




1888 


1882 


,1883 




1887 


1884 


-1888 


1876 


-1878 


1879-1888 




1876 


1877-1886 


1877 


1878 


1882- 


-1886 


1882 


-1885 


1882- 


-1888 


1886,1887 


1882 


1883 


1883,1884 


1883- 


-1885 




1886 


1876,1877 


1878- 


-1881 


1882-1888 




1887 


1877- 


-1880 




1888 




1878 




1879 


1883- 


-1888 



170 



STATE HlSTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 



CHEROKEE COONTY- 

EmplreClty Echo 

The Ionian Casket (monthly), Quakervale 

Western Friend (monthly), Quakervale 

The Laborer's Tribune, Weir 



■concluded. 



CHEYENNE COUNTY. 

Cheyenne County Rustler, Wane 

Plaindealer, Wano 

Bird City News 

Cheyenne County Democrat, Bird City 

The Gleaner, Jaqua 



CLARK COUNTY. 



Clark County Clipper, Ashland 

Republican Herald, Ashland 

Asnland Journal 

Clark County Chief, Englewood 

The Englewood Chief 

Englewood Enterprise 

Appleton Kansas Era 

Tne I^exington Leader 

The Minneola Era 

Clark County Republican, Minneola. 
Cash City Cashier 



CLAY COUNTY. 

Clay County Dispatch, Clay Center 

The Localist, Clay Center 

The Democrat, Clay Center 

The Cresset, Clay Center 

The Times, Clay Center , 

The Times (dailv),CIay Center 

The Kansas Baptist, Clay Center 

The Monitor, Clay Center 

Clay Center Eagle 

Republican Valley Democrat, Clay Center 

Morganville News and Sunflower 

The Clay County Sentinel, Morganville 

The Idana Journal 

Wakefield Advertiser 

The Herald, Industry 



CLOUD COUNTY. 

Republican Valley Empire, Clyde and Concordia 

Concordia Empire 

The Republican-Empire, Concordia \ 

Concordia Empire 

The Concordia Republican 

The Concordia Expositor 

The Cloud County Blade, Concordia 

Kansas Blade, Concordia 

Concordia I^aily Blade !!!!!!!....! 

Cloud County Critic, Concordia .......'! 

The Concordia Times ...",.. 

Concordia Democrat, and Daylight !!........,...."!! 

Clyde Democrat 

The Clyde Herald 

Cllne's Press, Clyde 

The Clyde Mail .".'.'."."."..V." 

The Clyde Argus ".".!'.'.*.'.!!*.""" 

Glasco Tribune 

The Glasco Sun ...............!.....!!!1 

Cloud County Kansan, Jamestown !!!!!"!!!!!..'..*.*.*". 

The Mlltonvale News 

Milton vale Star ..........!!!!!! 

Mlltonvale Chieftain... ......'..'."..'.*.''*."....".'.'! 

Ames Advocate .!!"!!!!!!!.'.'.'..!!!!* 

The Ames Bureau 

The Weekly Courier, Ames .."!.".*!!!"."..."."!.'.'.'." 



VT t. ,r ,. ,, . COFFEY COUNTY. 

Neosho Valley Register, Burlington 

Kansas Patriot, Burlington, (duplicate of 1867.V.!.'.'."" 

Burlin>,'ton Patriot .' 

Burlington Republican 

The Kepublican-Patriot, Burlington 

Burlington Daily Republican-Patriok '.'.'.'.". 

The Burlington Independent 



Years. 



1877-1879 


3 


1878,1879 


1 


1880-1888 


7 


1884-1888 


5 


1885-1888 


3 


1886-1888 


2 


1886-1888 


2 


1886-1888 


2 


1887,1888 


1 


1884-1888 


4 


1886,1887 


2 


1887,1888 


2 


1885-1887 


8 


1888 


1 


1888 


1 


1885-1887 


2 


1886-1888 


2 


1887,1888 


1 


1888 


1 


1887,1888 


1 


1876-1888 


13 


1879-1881 


3 


1879,1880 


2 


1882,1883 


1 


1882-1888 


7 


1886-1888 


6 


1881-1884 


3 


1883,1884 


1 


1885,1886 


1 


1886-1888 


3 


1885-1887 


3 


1887,1888 


2 


1886,1887 


1 


1887,1888 


2 


1887,1888 


1 


1870-1872 


3 


1876-1882 


7 


1883-1886 


4 


1887,1888 


2 


1882,1883 


2 


1877-1881 


b 


1879-1881 


3 


1882-1888 


7 


1884-1888 


6 


1882-1888 


7 


1884-1888 


5 


1886-1888 


3 


1880-1882 


2 


1878-1888 


10 


1884 


1 


1884-1887 


3 


1888 


1 


1881,1882 


1 


1883-1888 


6 


1881-1888 


7 


1882-1888 


8 


1886 


1 


1888 


1 


1886,1886 


1 


1887 


1 


1888 


1 


1859,1860 


1 


1864-1868 


5 


1876-1886 


10 


1882-1886 


4 


1886 


1 


1887 


1 


1876-1888 


13 



Sixth biennial Bepobt, 



171 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES, AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Contini 



Newspapers. 




Burlington Daily Star 

The Burlington Nonpareil. 

Leroy Reporter 

The Leroy Eagle 

TheLebo Light 

The Waverly News 

The Gridley Gazette 



COFFEY COVSTY — concluded. 



COMANCHE COUNTY. 

Comanche Chieftain, Nescatunga 

The Western Kansan, Nescatunga 

Nescatunga Enterprise 

Cold water Review 

The Western Star, Coldwater 

Republican, Coldwater 

Coldwater Echo 

Comanche County Citizen, Avilla 

The Avilla Democrat 

Protection Echo. 

The Protection Press 

Kansas Weekly Ledger, Protection 

The Leader, Protection 

Evansville Herald 

Comanche City News 



1878 
1887-1888 
1879-1888 

1888 
1884,1888 
1885,1888 
1887,1888 



1884-1886 
1885,1887 
188(5-1888 
1884-1888 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1887,1888 
1885,1886 
1^86,1887 
1885-1887 
1886,1887 
1887 
1888 
1885-1887 
1886-1888 



COWLEY COUNTY. 

Winfield Courier 1873-1888 

Winfield Daily Courier 1885-1: 

Winfield Plow and Anvil 1876 

Cowley County Telegram, Winfield 1876-1888 

Winfield Daily Telegram, (1883-1886 lacking,) 1879-1888 

Winfield Semi-Weekly 1879,1880 

Cowley County Monitor, Winfield 1880 

Cowley County Courant, Winfield 1881,1882 

Winfield Daily Courant 1881,1882 

TheDailv Visitor, Winfield 1886-1888 

The Winfield Tribune 1884-1888 

The American Nonconformist, Winfield 

Southwestern Kansas Conference Daily, Winfield 

Arkansas City Traveler and Republican-Traveler 

Arkansas Valley Democrat, Arkansas City 

The Arkansas City Republican 

Rep|i)lican-Traveler (daily), Arkansas City 

Canal City Daily Dispatch, Arkansas City 

Canal City Dispatch (weekly), Arkansas City 

The Fair Play, Arkansas City 

The New Enterprise, Burden 

Burden Enterprise 

Burden Eagle 

Cambridge Commercial.. 

The News, Cambridge .. 

The Eye, Dexter 

The Udall Sentinel 

TheUdall Record 

The Cambridge News 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

Girard Press 

Crawford County News, Girard 

Girard Herald 

The Kansas Workman, monthly, Girard 

Cherokee Index 

The Young Cherokee, Cherokee 

Cherokee Banner 

The Temperance Rural, Cherokee, (one duplicate,) 

Sentinel on the Border, Cherokee 

The Cherokee Sentinel 

The Saturday Cyclone, Cherokee ...^.... 

The Smelter. Pittsburg 

The Headlight, Pittsburg 

The Daily Headlight, Pittsburg 

The McCune Standard 

The McCune Times 

The Brick, McCune and Pittsburg 

Walnut Journal 

The Educational Advocate, Walnut 

The Arcadia Reporter 



1887,1888 

1887 
1876-1888 
1879-1888 
1884-1886 
1886-1886 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 

1888 
1880,1881 
1882-1888 
1885-1888 

1881 
1882-1886 
1884-1888 
1885,1886 
1886,1887 

1888 



1874-1888 
1876-1880 
1880-1888 
1882-1884 
1876,1877 
1876,1877 
1877,1878 
1878,1879 
1879-1882 
1883-1888 
1885-1887 
1881-1888 
1886-1888 

1887 
1881,1882 
1882-1888 
1886,1887 
1882-1888 

1884 
1882-1887 



172 



STATE HISTOBIGAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




CRAWFORD covVTY — coneluded. 

The Christian Worker, Arcadia 

The Hepler I^eader 

The Hepler Banner 

The Karlington Plaindealer 

Farlington Gem 

Mulberry (Jrove Gazette 

DAVIS COUNTY. 

Junction City Union, (triplicates of '75, 76, '77, '78, and duplicates of '79-86,)... 

The Junction City Daily Union 

Junction City Tribune 

The Youths' Casket (monthly), Junction City 

Davis County Republican, Junction City 

The Junction City Methodist 

DECATUR COUNTY. 

TheOberlin Herald 

The Eve, Oberlin 

The Oberlin World and Democrat 

Oberlin Opinion '. 

The Norcatur Register 

The Allison Breeze and Times 

DICKINSON COUNTY. 

Dickinson County Chronicle, Abilene 

Kansas (Jazette, Enterprise and Abilene 

Abilene Daily Gazette 

The Weeklv Democrat, Abilene 

The Abilene Reflector 

The Abilene Daily Reflector 

The Solomon Sentinel, Solomon City 

Enterprise Register 

The Anti-Monopolist, Enterprise 

The Chapman Star 

The Chapman Courier 

The Herington Tribune 

The Hope Herald 

The Hope Dispatch 

Carlton Advocate 

The Banner Register, Banner City 

The Manchester Sun 

DONIPHAN COUNTY. 

White Cloud Chief, ( 7 duplicates,) 

Weekly Kansas Chief, Troy, ( 1 duplicate,) 

Troy Reporter 

Doniphan County Republican, Troy, (1873 lackinir.) 

Troy Weekly Bulletin 

The Troy Times 

El wood Advertiser, (1 duplicate,) ....".....!.!!.....!!!!.'.!..*.*."*. 

Kansas Free Press, Elwood. (1 duplicate,) 

Elwood Free Press, (1 duplicate,) 

Watbena Reporter, (1868-1873 lacking,) ". '"" 

Highland Sentinel 

The Central State, Highland 

White rioud Review .\.\".!!y.'.*.!!".!'..".'!!!.'."'."'.'.*.'. 

Enterprise, Severance, (and Centralia, Nemaha county,) ....."...........!!..,.!.!.!...!!!!.! 

DOUGLAS COUNTY. 

Herald of Freedom, Lawrence, (7 duplicates,) 

Kansas Free-State, Lawrence 

Lawrence Republican, (volumes 1 and 3, incomplete,) .'.'..'.r.'///.*.!!'.'.*///.."."!*."!.*."!!!.'!^^^^^^ 

The Western Home Journal. Lawrence .'......".".'.'."*."!!.".*.*.*!!! 

The Weekly Kansas Journal, Lawrence '..'.'.!!*.*.'.*.*,'.'.'.!!!!! 

Republican-Journal (daily), Lawrence '.!!!!!!."*.*.' 

I^awrence Daily Journal '.'."!.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

The Congregational Record, monthly, ( Lawrence, January, 1*859. to De^^^^ 

Topeka, June, 1865, to May, 1867.) .. 

The Tribune, Lawrence, (lacking 1873 and 1875,) '.......'..'. 

The Semi-Weekly Tribune, and the Weekly Herald-Tribune, Lawrence!!!.*!!'.'.'.".!'.".'.!!.*.'.*"*.*.' 
The I^wrence Tribune 

T,^® Tl^Ii",".®' '^"*'J^' ^^®^'^' ^^'^' *"9' an** part of 1877 "lacking"";*"d'u'p"li"c^^^^^^ 

Herald-Tribune, daily, l^awrence " 

Evening Tribune, Lawrence !!!."!!!!!.'.'.'!!!!!.!!!'!! 

Spirit of Kansas, Lawrence .'.".!!!!"."..!!..."....".*. 

Kansas Collegiate, Lawrence 

The University Courier, Lawrence !... .!!!....'.'.*!!!.".*.".* 



1883 



1886,1887 



1865-1888 
1887 

1873-1888 
1878 

1882-1888 

1886,1887 



1879-1888 
1883-1888 
1885,1886 



1887,1888 



1876-1888 
1876-1888 
1886-1888 
1880-1882 
188:^-1888 
1887,1888 
1879-1888 
1883,1884 
1884-1888 
1884-1886 
1887,1888 
1885-1888 
1885-1888 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 

1857-187f 
1876-1888 
1866,1867 
]871-lf75 
1877-1879 
1886-1888 
1857,1858 
1858,1859 
1859-1861 
1867-1877 
1878,1879 
1880-1882 
1880-1887 



1854-1859 
1855,1856 
1857-1860 
1869-1884 
188(>-1888 
1877-1880 
1880-1888 

1859-1867 
1868-1883 
1884,1885 
1885-1888 
1873-1884 
1884,1886 
1886-1888 
1875-1882 
1875-1879 
1878,1879 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 



173 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Neivspapers. 




DOUGLAS cov^TY — concluded. 



University Courier, Lawrence 

The Kansas Review (monthly), Lawrence 

Lawrence Standard 

Kansas Monthly, Lawrence 

The Daily Reporter, Lawrence 

Kansas Temperance Palladium, Lawrence 

Die Germania, Lawrence 

The Kansas Liberal (monthly), Lawrence, July to September, 1882, (see Valley Falls,)., 

The Lawrence Gazette 

Lawrence Daily Gazette 

Western Recorder, Lawrence 

Kansas Churchman (monthly), Lawrence 

Kansas Daily Herald, Lawrence 

The Head Center and Daily Morning Sun, Lawrence 

The Daily Morning News, Lawrence 

Once a Week, Lawrence 

Sigma Nu Delta (bi-monthly), Lawrence 

Evening Telegram, Lawrence 

Lawrence Daily Democrat 

The Kansas Zephyr, Lawrence 

North Lawrence Leader 

Freeman's Champion, Prairie City 

Baldwin Criterion 

The Baldwin Visitor 

The Baldwin Ledger 

The Baldwin Index, Baker University 

Lecompton Monitor 

The Eudora News , 



EDWARDS COUNTY. 

Edwards County Leader, Kinsley 

Valley Republican, (bound with Kinsley Graphic, 1878,). 

Kinsley Republican 

The Kinsley Graphic, (except 1882,) 

Kinsley Republican-Graphic 

Edwards County Banner, Kinsley 

Weekly Banner-Graphic, Kinsley 

Kansas Staats-Zeitung, Kinsley 

The Kinsley Mercury 

Kinsley Daily Mercury 

The Wendell Champion 

Belpre Beacon 



ELK COUNTY. 

The Courant, Howard 

The Courant-Ledger, Howard 

Industrial Journal, Howard 

The Howard Courant 

Kansas Rural, Howard 

The Howard Journal 

The Howard Democrat 

Kansas Traveler, Howard 

Howard Daily Traveler 

The Broad Axe, Howard 

Elk County Ledger, Elk Falls 

The Weekly Examiner, Elk Falls 

Elk Falls Signal 

The Pioneer, Longton 

The Times, Longton 

Longton Leader 

Moline News 

Moline Mercury, (1883 and 1884 lacking,) 

The Moline Free Press 

Grenola Argus 

The Grenola Chief 

Grip, Howard 

The Cave Springs Globe 

The Herald, Cana Valley 

The Grenola Hornet 



ELLIS COUNTY. 

Ellis County Star ( lacking from December 7, 1876, to April 11, 1879,) Hays City. 

Hays Sentinel, Hays City 

The Star-Sentinel, and Hays City Sentinel 

German-American Advocate, Hays City 

Ellis Weekly Headlight, Hays City 

Hays City Times, Hays City 



1882-188(5 
1879-1888 
1877-1879 
1878-1881 
1879 
1879,1880 
1880-1888 

1882-1888 
1884,1885 
1883,1884 
1883-1885 
1883,1884 

1883 
1883,1884 
1883-1885 
1886-1888 

1888 

1888 
1884-1887 
1884,1885 
1857,1858 
1883-1885 

1884 
1885-1888 

1886 
1885,1886 
1887,1888 



1877-1880 

1877,1878 

1878-1881 

1878-1887 

1882 

1887 

1887,1888 

1878,1879 

1883-1888 

1887,1888 

1885-1888 

1888 



1875-1877 
1878-1880 
1878-1880 
1880-1888 

1881 
1880-1883 
1884-1888 
1886,1887 

1887 

1888 
1876,1877 

1878 
1880-1882 
1880,1881 
1881-1888 

1887 

1880 
1882-1888 
1883-1885 
1880-1882 
1883-1888 
1883,1884 

1882 
1882,1883 
1884,1885 



1876-1881 
1877-1881 
1880-1888 
1882-1886 
1882-1888 



174 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 



ELLIS covstY — concluded. 
Ellis County Democrat and Ellis County Free Press, Hays City. 

ElUs Review, Hays City ™ 

Democratic Times, Hays City 

Tlie Republican, Hays City 

Walker Journal 



ELLSWORTH COUNTY. 



Ellsworth Reporter 

The Rural West. Ellsworth. 

The F^llsworth News 

The Ellsworth Democrat 

Wilson Index 

The Wilson Echo 

The Wilson Wonder 

Cain City News 

The Kanopolis Journal 

The Holyrood Enterprise 

The Wilson Hawkeye 



FINNEY COUNTY. 

The Irrigator, Garden City 

Garden ( itv Herald, ( 1884-7 lacking,) 

Garden City Herald (daily) 

Garden City Sentinel 

Garden City Sentinel (daily) 

The Cultivator and Herdsman, monthly and weekly. Garden City. 

The Western Times, Garden City 

Finney County Democrat, Garden City 

Pierce ville Courier 

Terry Enterprise 

The Terry Eye 

Locomotive, \joco 

The Hattield News 



FOOTE COUNTY. 

(See Gray county.) 

The New West and the Optic, Cimarron 

The Signet, Cimarron 



FORD COUNTY. 

Dodge City Times 

Ford County Globe, Dodge City 

The Globe Live-Stock Journal, i)odge City 

Dodge City Democrat 

Kansas Cowbov, Dodge City 

The Sun, Dodge < ity 

Ford County Republican, Dodge City 

Speareville Enterprise 

Spearevilie News 

Speareville Hlade 

Ford Touuty Record, Speareville 

Ford County Democrat, S|)eare ville and Fonda 

The Ryansville Boomer, and The Boomer, Ford City. 

Wilburn Argus , 

Bucklin Standard 

TheBucklin Herald 

The Weekly Telegram, Bloom 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Western Home Journal, Ottawa 

Ottawa Journal 

The Triumph, Ottawa 

Ottawa Journal and Triumph , 

Ottawa Tampus, occasional, (vols. 1 and 2,) , 

Ottawa Republican, ( 1875 lacking,) 

Ottawa Daily Republican 

Kansas Home News, Ottawa 

Ottawa (iazette 

Ottawa I.«ader ''.''.'* 

Kansas Fiee Trader (monthly), Ottawa '. 

Queen City Herald, Ottawa 

Jefferies Western Monthlv, Ottawa. %. 

Daily Ix»cal News, Ottawa' , 

Williamsburg Review ' 

Weekly Gazette, Williamsburg 

Ihe Eagle, Williamsburg 7. 

Lane Advance 




1886-1888 
1886-1888 



1887,1888 



1875-1888 
1882 
1883,1884 
1885-1888 
1878,1879 
1880-1888 
1886,1887 
1882-1886 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



1882-1886 
1883-1888 
1886-1888 
1884-1888 
1886-1888 
1884-1886 
1885 
1887,1888 
1886,1887 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 



1879-1881 



1876-1888 
1878-1884 
1884-1887 
1884-1888 
1884,1885 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1878 
1878-1880 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1886,1887 
1885-1887 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



1865-1868 

1870-1874 

1876 

1877-1888 

1864-1888 

1874-1888 

1879-1888 

1879,1880 

1879 

1880 

1883 

1883-1887 

1884,1885 

1886-1888 

1879 

1880-1883 

1885-1888 

1881,1882 



SIXTH BIENNIAL REPOBT. 



175 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Neivspapers. 




FRANKLIN COUNTY — Concluded. 



The Coiumercial Bulletin, Lane 

The Wellsville News 

The Wellsville Transcript 

The Wellsville News (second) 

The Wellsville Exchange.... 

The Pomona Enterprise 

Richmond Recorder 

Princeton Progress 

Fireside, Factory and Farm, Ottawa. 

The Kansas Lever, Ottawa 

The Bee (daily and weekly), Ottawa. 



GARFIELD COUNTY. 

Ravanna Chieftain 

Ravanna Sod-House 

Ravanna Record 

The Ravanna Enquirer 

The Kal Vesta Herald 

The Essex Sunbeam 

The Garfield County Call, Eminence 

Garfield County Journal, Loyal 



GOVE COUNTY, 

Buffalo Park Express 

Buffalo Park Pioneer 

The Golden Belt Republican, Grinnell 

Cap Sheaf, Grainfield 

Gazette, Gove City 

■Gove County Graphic, (iove City 

The Settler's Guide, Quinter 

The Smoky Globe, Jerome 



1886-1888 
1882 
1882,1883 
1884-1886 
1887,1888 
1885-1888 
1885-1888 
1885-1888 
188G-1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



1885-1888 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1886-1888 
1887 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



1880 
1885,1887 
1885,1888 
1885,1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1886-1888 



GRAHAM COUNTY. 

The Western Star, Hill City 1879, 

Hill City Lively Times 

The Hill City Reveille 1884- 

Hill City Democrat 1887, 

Oraham County Lever, Gettysburg 1879, 

The Millbrook Times .'. 1879- 

Graham County Republican, Millbrook 

Millbrook Herald 1882, 

Millbrook Herald (second) 1885- 

The Graham County Democrat, Millbrook 1885- 

Roscoe Tribune j 1880, 

Western Cyclone, Nicodemus 1886- 

Nicodemus Enterprise 

The Fremont Star 1886- 

The Fremont Press 

GRANT COUNTY. 

Grant County Register, Ulysses 1885- 

Ulysses Tribune 1 1887, 



1880 
1881 
1888 
1888 
1880 
1888 
1881 



1881 
1888 
1887 
1888 
1888 



The Post, Surprise. 

Shockeyville Eagle 

Golden Gazette 

Zionville Sentinel 

The Commercial, Cincinnati and Appomattox 

The Standard-Democrat, Cincinnati and Appomattox. 

The Lawson Leader 

Conductor Punch 



GRAY COUNTY. 

The New West, Cimarron and Echo 

Cimarron Herald and Kansas Sod House 

The Jacksonian, Cimarron 

Cray County Echo, Ingalls and Cimarron 

Ingalls Union. 

Gray County Republican, Ingalls 

The Montezuma Chief 

Ensign Razzoop 



GREELEY COUNTY. 

Greeley County Gazette, Greeley Center and Horace 

Greeley County News, Greeley Center and Horace 

Horace Messenger 



1887 
,1887 
,1888 
,1888 
,1888 



1886 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 



1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1885-1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 



1886-1888 
1886-1888 



—12 



176 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Ck)NTlNUKD. 



Newapapers, 




GREELEY COWtY—COnclvded. 

Hector Echo 

Greeley County Tribune, Tribune, and Reid 

Greeley County Enterprise, Tribune 

Greeley County Republican, Reid 

Ck>lokan Graphic 



GREENWOOD COUNTY. 

Eureka Censorial 

Eureka Herald 

The Graphic, Eureka 

The Eureka Republican 

Greenwood County Republican, Eureka 

The Eureka Sun 

Greenwood County Democrat, Eureka 

Democratic Messenger, Eureka 

Madison Times , 

The Madison News 

The Zenith, and the Madison Times 

Fall River Times 

Fall River Echo 

Fall River Courant 

Severy Pioneer 

Southern Kansas Journal, Severy 

Severy L!l)eral 

Severy Record 

The Kansas Clipper, Severy 

The Sunflower, Reece 

Greenwood Review, Virgil 



HAMILTON COUNTY. 

The Syracuse Journal 

Syracuse Sentinel, (removed from Johnson City, Stanton county,). 

Syracuse Democrat 

Democratic Principle, Syracuse 

West Kansas News, Syracuse 

Border Ruffian, Coolidge 

Coolidge Citizen , 

Coolidge Times 

Surprise Post 

The Signal, Kendall 

The Kendall Boomer 

Kendall Republican 

Kendall (iazette 



Johnson City Sentinel, (since in Stanton county,). 
Enfield Tribune 



HARPER COUNTY. 

The Anthony Republican 

Anthony Daily Republican 

Harper County Enterprise, Anthony 

The Harper County Democrat, Anthony 

Anthony Free Press, daily 

Anthony Journal „ 

Anthony Daily Journal 

Harper County Times, Harper 

The Sentinel, Harper 

The Daily Sentinel, Harper 

Harper Graphic 

Harper Daily (graphic 

Bluff City Tribune 

The Danville Courant 

The Danville Express 

The Attica Advocate 

Attica Kulletin 

Attica Daily Advocate 

P>eeport Leader 

Midlothian Sun, Freeport \\ 

The Freeport Tribune, (changed from Sun.) 

The Crisfield Courier f. ' 



HARVEY COUNTY. 

Zur Heimath, (semi-monthly), Halstead 

The Halstead Independent 

The Halstead Clipper 

Halstead Herald '. '."'."; 

Harvey County News, Newton 

The Newton Republican, (changed ft-om Harvey County NewsJ 



1880,1887 
1887, 18S8 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



1876-1879 
1876-1888 
1879-1 S82 
1879, 18S0 
1S80-1888 
1879,1880 
1882-1884 
18S4-1888 
1877,1878 
1879-1888 
1886-1888 
1881-18«8 
1883-1886 
1886-1888 
1882 
1881-1887 
1885, 18S6 
1887,1888 
1887,188s 
1885,1886 
1887,1888 



1885-1888 
1886-1888 

1887 
1887,1888 

1887 
1885-1887 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 

18.S6 
1880,1887 
188tJ-1888 
1886,1887 

1887 
1 886-1888 
1886,1887 



1879-1888 
1886-1888 
1885-1888 
1 880-1 S88 
1887,1888 
1878-l>i84 

188S 
1878-188.T 
1882-1888 
1886-1888 
1883-1888 

1880 
1886-1888 
1883,1884 
1885,1886 
1885-1888 
1886-1888 

1887 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 

1886 
1885-1888 



1875-1881 
1881-1888 
1884-1886 
1887,1888 
1876-1879 
1879-1888 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 



177 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers, 




HARVEY COUNTY — concluded. 

Newton Daily Republican 

Newton Kansan , 

Newton Daily Kansan 

The Golden Gate, Newton > 

Das Neue Vaterland, Newton 

The Newton Democrat 

Newton Anzeiger 

The Kansas Commoner, Newton 

The Kansas Chronicle, Newton 

The Burrton Telephone , 

The Burrton Monitor .• 

The Burrtoii Graphic 

The Jayhawker and Palladium, Sedgwick 

The Pantagraph, Sedgwick 

"Walton Independent 



HASKELL COUNTY. 

Ivanhoe Times 

Santa Fe Trail 

Santa Fe Champion 

Haskell County Review, Santa Fe 

Haskell County Republican, Santa Fe 

The Santa Fe Leader 



1886-1888 
1876-1888 

1887,1888 
1879-1882 

1879 
1S83-1887 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 

1888 
1878-1881 
1881-1888 
1886-1888 
18S2-1884 
1884-1888 
1886-1888 



1886-1888 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1888 
1888 



HODGEMAN COUNTY. ' 

Agitator, Hodgeman Center 1879,1880 

Republican, Fordham '. 1879 

The Buckner Independent, Jetmore 1879-1881 

The Jetmore Reveille 1882-18S8 

Hodgeman County Scimitar, Jetmore 1886-1888 

Jetmore Siftings 1886-1888 

Jetmore Journal 1887,1888 

The Orwell Times 1885,1886 



JACKSON COUNTY. 

Holton Express 

Holton Recorder 

The Holton Argus 

The Holton Signal 

Ja'ikson County Federal, Holton 

The Bee (daily and weekly), Netawaka and Holton.... 

The Whiting Weekly News 

The Hoyt Times 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

The Kansas Educational Journal, Grasshopper Falls. ( See Leavenworth county.) 

The Kansas New Era, Grasshopper Falls , 

Valley Falls New Era 

The Valley Falls Liberal and the Kansas Liberal (monthly), Valley Falls and Lawrence. 

Lucifer, (the Light-Bearer,) Valley Falls 

Valley Falls Register 

The Oskaloosa Independent 

Sickle and Sheaf, Oskaloosa 

Oskaloosa Weekly Sickle 

The Winchester Argus 

The Winchester Herald 

The Kaw Valley Chief, Perry 

The Perry Monitor and Kaw Valley Chief (second), Perry 

The Nortonville News 

Meriden Report 

The Osawkie Times 

The McLouth Times 



JEWELL COUNTY. 



Jewell County Diamond, Jewell City 

Jewell County Republican, Jewell City 

Jewell County Monitor, Jewell Center j. 

Jewell County Monitor and Diamond, Jewell Center. 
Jewell County Monitor, Jewell Center and Mankato.. 
Jewell County Review, Jewell Center and Mankato... 

Mankato Review 

Mankato Daily Review 

The Kansas Jewellite, Mankato 

The Jacksonian, Mankato 

White Oak Independent 

Jewell County Journal, Omio 

Western Advocate, Omio 



1872-1875 

1875-1888 
1877 
1878-1888 
1886,1887 
1879,1880 
1883-1888 
1887 



1866,1867 
1873-1888 
1880-1883 
1883-1888 
1881-1888 
1870-1888 
1873-1879 
1879-1886 
1879-1888 
1888 
1879-1882 
1883,1884 
1885-1888 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1887,1888 



1876,1877 
1879-1888 
1876,1877 
1878,1879 
1880-1888 
1879-1882 
1883-1888 

1887 
1882,1883 

1888 

1879 
1879,1880 

1882 



178 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— C^ntinukd. 



Netospapert. 




JEWELL COUNTY - 

The Omlo Mall 

Burr Oak Reveille 

Burr Oak Herald 

Burr Oak Rustler 

Independent Republican, Burr Oak 

Salem Chronicle 

Salem Argus 

The People's Friend, Salem 

Randall Register 

Randall Tribune 



- concluded. 



JOHNSON COUNTY. 

Olathe Mirror 

Mirror and News-Letter, Olathe 

The Olathe Mirror, (1884-6, see below,) 

Olathe Mirror-Gazette 

Western Progress, Olathe 

Kansas Star, Olathe 

Olathe I>eader 

Olathe Gazette 

Educational Advocate, Olathe 

Johnson County Democrat, Olathe 

Kansas Patron, Olathe 

The Olathe Republican , 

Kansas Register, Spring Hill 

Weekly Review, Spring Hill 

Spring Hill New Era 



KEARNEY COUNTY. 

Lakin Herald 

The Kearney County Advocate, Lakin 

Pioneer Democrat, Lakin , 

Hartland Times. 

Hartland Herald 

Kearney County Coyote, Chantilly, and Omaha 



KINGMAN COUNTY. 

The Kingman Mercury 

The Kingman Blade * 

The Kingman County Citizen, Kingman 

The Kingman County Republican-, Kingman 

Citizen-Kepublican, Kingman 

Southern Kansas Democrat, Kingman 

The Kingman Courier 

Kingman Dailv Courier 

Kingman I^eader 

Kingman News 

Kingman Daily News, (November, 1887, to February, 1888, lacking,). 

Voice of the People, Kingman 

News, Norwich 

Ninnescah and Cunningham Herald 

The Spivey Dispatch.... 

New Murdock Herald 

The Pfnalosa News 

The Nashville News 



KIOWA COUNTY. 

Wellsford Register t. 

Wellsford Republican , 

Kiowa County iJemocrat, Wellsford 

The Democrat and Watchman, Dowell post office , 

Comanche Chief and The Kiowa Chief, Reeder , 

Oreensburg Signal 

Greensburg Rustler 

Oreensburg Republican 

Mullinville Mallet 



The Weekly Telegram, Mullinville.. 
The Haviland Tribune 



Parsons Sun , 

Parsons Sun, daily 

Parsons Ek:lipse 

Parsons Dally Eclipse 

Daily Outlook, Parsons , 

Dally Infant Wonder, Parsons. 
Daily Republican, Parsons , 



LABETTE COUNTY. 



1884 
1880-1884 



1886,1887 
1886,1887 



1885-1887 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 



1876-1882 
1882-1888 
1883-1886 
1876-1880 
1876-1888 
1879-1882 
1879-1883 



1882-1888 
1884,1885 
1878 
1881,1882 
1883-1885 



1882-1884 
1885-1888 
188.5-1888 
1886,1887 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 



1878-1880 
1880 
1879-1884 
1882-1884 
1884 
1883-1888 
1884-1888 
1887,1888 
1884-1888 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 



1886-1888 

1887,1888 

1887 

1887,1888 



1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1885,1880 
1886 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1886-1888 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 



1876-1888 
1884-1888 
1876-1888 
1881-1888 
1877,1878 
1878-1880 
1880,1881 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 



179 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 



LABETTE COUNTY — concluded. 

Parsons Palladium i 1883-1888 



The Daily Evening Star, Parsons, (April 6 to October 19, 1881,). 
Southern Kansas Advance, Chetopa.. 

Chetopa Advance 

Chetopa Herald 

Chetopa Statesman 

The Chetopa Democrat 

Oswego Independent 

Labette County Democrat, Oswego... 

The Oswego Republican 

The Oswego Daily Republican 

The Oswego Bee 

The Oswego Daily Bee 

Mound Valley Herald 

Mound Valley News 

The Altamont Sentinel 

The Edna Star 




LANE COUNTY. 



Lane County Gazette, California. 

Lane County Herald, Dighton 

The Dighton Journal 

Dighton Republican 



LEAVENWORTH COUNTY. 

Kansas Herald, Leavenworth 

Kansas Territorial Register, Leavenworth 

Leavenworth Conservative, daily, (January to June, 1867, lacking,) 

Times and Conservative, Leavenworth (daily) 

Leavenworth Times, daily, (July to October, 1878, lacking,) 

Leavenworth Times (weekly) 

Leavenworth Daily Commercial 

Kansas Freie Presse, Leavenworth (weekly) 

Kansas Freie Presse, Leavenworth (daily) 

Leavenworth Appeal 

Leavenworth Appeal and Herald 

Leavenworth Appeal and Tribune 

Public Press, Leavenworth (weekly) 

Public Press, Leavenworth, daily, (from July, 1877, to June, 1879, lacking) 

Home Record, Leavenworth (monthly) 

Democratic Standard, Leavenworth (weekly) 

Kansas Farmer, Leavenworth (monthly) 

Leavenworth Evening Standard 

The Kansas Educational Journal, monthly: Leavenworth, January, 1864, to August, 
1865 ; Grasshopper Falls, September, 1865, to January, 1866 ; Topeka, June, 1866, to 
August, 1867 ; Emporia, September, 1867, to April, 1871 ; Emporia and Topeka, May, 
1871, to April, 1873 

Orphan's Friend, Leavenworth (monthly) 

The Western Homestead, Leavenworth (monthly) 

The Workingman's Friend, Leavenworth 

Leavenworth Weekly Chronicle .- 

The Visitor, Leavenworth .' 

The Catholic, Leavenworth 

The Kansas Prohibitionist, Leavenworth 

Kansas Commoner, Leavenworth 

Truth, monthly, Leavenworth 

The Daily Sun, Leavenworth 

Leavenworth Post (daily) 

The Tonganoxie Mirror 

The Tonganoxie News, changed from Linwood Leader 

The Linwood Leader 



LINCOLN COUNTY. 



Lincoln County News, Lincoln Center 

Saline Valley Register, Lincoln Center 

Lincoln Register, Lincoln Center 

Saline Valley Register, Lincoln Center 

Lincoln Banner. Lincoln Center 

Lincoln Republican, Lincoln Center 

The Argus and Beacon, Lincoln Center 

The Beacon of Lincoln County, Lincoln Center., 

The Lincoln Beacon, Lincoln Center 

Lincoln County Democrat, Lincoln 

The Sylvan Grove Sentinel 



1881 
1876-1878 
1878-1888 
1876-1878 
1885-1888 

1888 
1876-1888 
1880-1888 
1881-1886 
1881-1883 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1885-1888 
1886,1887 
18S6-1888 
1887,1888 



1880-1882 
1885-1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 



1854-1859 
1855 
1861-LS68 
1869,1870 
1870-1888 
1876-1880 
1878-1876 
1876-1886 
1876-1886 
1876-1878 
1879 
1879,1880 
1877-1883 
1877-1882 
1876-1888 
1880-1882 
1867-1872 
1881-1888 



1864-1873 
1878-1888 
1878-1882 
1881-1883 
1883,1884 
188-'-l884 
1 885-1 K88 
1883,1884 
1884,1885 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1888 
1882-1888 
1885-1887 
1883,1884 



1873 
1876-1879 
1879,1880 
1881-1883 
1884-1886 
1886-1888 

1880 
1881-1884 
1884-1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 



180 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continued. 



Newspapers. 




LINN COUNTY. 



Border Sentinel, Mound City. 

Linn County Clarion, Mound City. 

Mound City Progress 

La Cygne Weekly Journal 

La cVgne Leader 

The Heasanton Observer 

The Pleasauton Herald 

The Prescott Eagle 

The Blue Mound Sun 



LOGAN COUNTY. 



The Oakley Opinion 1885-1888 

The Oakley Republican 1887,1888 

Oakley Saturday Press.. 

I^gan County Times, Oakley and Russell Springs 1887,1888 

The Courier, Ennis and Monument 

The Scout, Gopher and Winona, ( bound with Winona Messenger,) 1886 



1866-1874 
1876-1888 
1884-1888 
1876-1888 
1887,1888 
1876-1>'88 
1882-1888 
1883-1888 



The Winona Clipper. 

McAllaster Weekly Record 

Augustine Herald 

The Leader, Russell Springs , 

The Record, Russell Springs 

The Logan County Republican, Russell Springs.. 



The Fanatic, Emporia. 

The Hartford Enterprise 

The Hartford Weekly Call 

Araericus Weekly Herald 

The Americus Ledger •. 

The Neosho Vivifier, Neosho Rapids 

The Neosho Valley Press, Neosho Rapids , 

The Admire City Free Press 

The Allen Tidings 



M'PHERSON COUNTY. 

The McPberson Independent 

The McPherson Freeman 

McPheraon Daily Freeman 

The McPberson Republican 

McPberson Daily Republican 

The Comet, McPberson 

Industrial Liberator, McPberson 

The McPberson Independent, McPberson 

The McPberson Press 

The McPberson County Champion, McPberson 

The Democrat, McPberson 

Kansas State Register, McPberson 

The .McPberson Anzeiger 

Lindsborg Localist 

Smoky Valley News. Lindsborg 

Kansas Posten, Lindsborg 

The Canton .Monitor 

Canton Carrier 

The Windom Record 

The Windom Enterprise 

The Moundridge Leader 

Marquette Monitor „ , 



1876-1879 

1878-1888 
1887,1888 
1879-1888 
1887,1888 
1881,1882 

1882 
1882-1884 
1884,1885 
188.5,1887 
1886-18S8 

1887 
1887,1888 
1879-1883 
1881-1888 
1882,1883 



1884-1886 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887 
1^88 



LYON COUNTY. 

Emporia News 1866-1888 

Emporia Daily News 1878-1888 

Kansas Educational Journal, Emporia, (see Leavenworth county,) 

Emporia Ledger 1876-1880 

The Hatchet (monthly), Emporia 1877,1878 

The Educationalist (monthly,) Emporia 1879-1880 

Emporia Sun 1878,1879 

The Kansas Greenbacker, and the National Era, Emporia 1878,1879 

The Emporia Journal 1880,1881 

The Kans-is Sentinel, Emporia 1880-1882 

Daily Bulletin, Emporia 1881 

Emporia Daily Republican I 1881-1888 

The Emporia Republican i 1886-1888 

Emporia Democrat I 1882-1888 

Emjwria Daily (ilobe ! 1886,1887 

18S7,18>-8 
1879,1880 
1879-1888 
1881,1882 
1885-1888 
18H5,1886 
1886,1887 
18S7,1888 
1^87,l888 



Sixth Biennial re poet. 



181 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




MARION COUNTY. 

Marion County Record, Marion Center , 

The School Galaxy, Marion Center 

Central Kansas Telegraph, Marion Center 

Marion Banner, Marion Center 

Marion Graphic, Marion Center 

Marion County Democrat and Independent, Marion Center.. 

The Marion Register, Marion 

The Marion Tribune 

The Cottonwood Valley Times, Marion 

Marion Daily Times 

The Marion County Anzeiger, Marion and Hillsboro 

The Peabody (iazette 

The Peabody Daily Gazette 

Peabody Reporter 

The Peabody Post 

Marion Graphic, Peabody 

Florence Herald, (1886 lacking,) 

Florence Tribune 

Florence Weekly News 

The Florence Weekly Bulletin 

Hillsboro Phonograph 

The Intelligencer, Hillsboro 

Freundschafts-Kreis, Hillsboro 

Hillsboro Herald 

Canada Arcade 



MARSHALL COUNTY. 

The Marysville Enterprise (volumes 1 and 3) , 

The Lantern, Marysville 

The Marshall County News, Marysville 

Kansas Staats-Zeitung, Marysville 

Marysville Signal 

Marysville Post, (German,) 

Marshall County Democrat, Marysville 

The Hugle Call, Marysville 

The True Republican, Marysville 

The Walerville Telegraph, (1874 and 1875 lacking,) 

Blue Rapids Times 

The Blue Rapids Lyre 

Irving, Blue Valley Gazette 

The Irving Citizen 

The Irving Leader 

Frankfort Record 

The National Headlight, Frankfort 

The Frankfort Bee 

The Frankfort Sentinel 

The Beat tie Boomerang 

The North Star, Beattie.'. 

The Star, Beattie 

The Visitor, Axtell 

Axtell Anchor 

Lincolnville Star 



I 1875-1888 

1877 

1880 

1880,1881 

1882,1883 

1883,1884 

1 1885,1888 

1886, 18H7 

1887,1888 

1888 

! 1887,1888 

! 1876-1888 

1887 

: 1880 

! 1882 

1883-1888 

1876-1888 

1884-1886 

1886,1887 

1887,1888 

1881 

1881,1882 

1885,1886 

1886,1887 

1887 



; 1866-1868 
1876 

j 1876-1888 
' 1879-1881 
i 1881-1^83 

1881-1888 

1883-1888 
i 1885,1886 

1886-1888 

1870-1888 
\ 1876-1888 
! 18.-6,1887 

1876-1878 
i 1880 

1886-1888 
; 1876-1879 
I 1879-1881 
i 1881-1888 
\ 1886-1888 

1883,1884 
I 1884,1885 
i 1885-1888 
I 1883,1884 

1883-1888 
1 1887,1888 



MEADE COUNTY. 

Fowler City Graphic 

The Fowler City Advocate 

Meade County Globe, Meade Center 

Meade Center Press 

The Press-Democrat, Meade Center 

Meade Center Telegram 

The Meade Republican, Meade Center 

The Hornet, Sjiring Lake, and Artois, Artesian City. 

The Guardian, West Plains 

The West Plains News and Democrat 

Meade County Times, Mertilla 



The Western Spirit, Paola 

The Miami Republican, Paola. 

Republican-Citizen, Paola 

Miami Talisman, Paola 

Paola Times 

The Border Chief, Louisburg..., 

Watchman, Louisburg 

The Louisburg Herald 

•Osawatomie Times 

The Osawatomie Sentinel , 



MIAMI COUNTY. 



1885-1888 
1886 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1886-1888 
1886 
1887,1888 
1885-1888 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1886-1888 



1874-1888 
1876-1888 
1878-1880 
1881,1882 
1882-1888 
1879-1881 
1881 
1887,1888 
1880,1881 
1885,1886 



182 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continued. 



Newspapers. 




MIAMI covvTY— concluded. 



Osawatomie Gaslight.. 
Graphic, Osawatomie. 
FonUna News 



MITCHELL COUNTY. 

Beloit Gazette, (duplicates from April, 1872, to April, 1873 ; 1873, 1874 and 1875 lacking;). 

Beloit Weekly Record 

The Beloit Courier 

Beloit Weekly i:)emocrat 

Western Democrat, Beloit, (1882 and 1883 lacking,) 

The Western Nationalist, Beloit 

The Echo, Cawker City 

The Cawker City Free Press 

Cawker City .Journal 

The Public Record, Cawker City 

Glen Elder Key 

Glen Elder Herald 

Simpson Siflings 

Scottaville Independent 



MONTGOMEBY COUNTY. 



Independence Courier 

Independence Kansan 

The Star, Independence 

The Star and Kansan, Independence 

The South Kansas Tribune, Independence 

The Workingman's Courier, Independence 

The Living Ace, Independence 

The Evening Reporter, Independence, (lacking from 1883 to February 17, 1886,). 

The Independence News (daily and weekly) 

Montgomery Argus, Independence 

Coffey ville Journal 

The Gate City Enterprise, Coffeyville 

Gate City Gazette. Coffeyville 

The Sun, Coffeyville 

Cherry vale Leader 

Cherry vale Globe 

Cherry vale News 

Cherry Valley Torch, Cherryvale 

Cherry vale (i lobe-News 

The Globe and Torch, Cherry vale 

Daily (Uobe and Torch, Cherryvale 

The Weekly Clarion, Cherryvale 

Cherryvale Bulletin 

The Cherryvale Republican 

The Cherryvale Champion 

The Elk City Globe 

The Elk City Star 

The Elk City Democrat 

The Elk City Eagle 

The Caney Chronicle! 

The Havana Vidette 

Havana Weekly Herald 

Liberty Light 

The Liberty Review 



MORRIS COUNTY. 



Morris County Republican, Council Grove 

Council (irove Democrat 

Republican and Democrat, Council Grove 

Council Grove Republican 

Morris County Times, Council Grove 

The Kansas Cosmos, Council Grove, (January to July, 1885, lacking; October 15, 

Cosmos consolidated with Council Grove Republican,) 

The Council (Jrove (Juard 

The Anti-Monopolist, Council Grove 

Morris County Enterprise, Parkerville , 

The Parkerville Times 

The Morris ("ounty News, White City 

The Dwight Wasp 



Frisco Pioneer 

Morton County Democrat, Frisco., 

The Richfield Leader 

The Leader-Democrat, Richfield... 



MORTON COUNTY. 



1887,1888 1 1 

1888 1 

1886-1888 I a 

I 

I 
1872-1888 
1877-1879 
1879-1888 I 
1878-1880 I 
188i)-1888 
1882,1883 
1876-1878 
1878-1883 
1880-1888 I 
1883-1888 ; 

1880 
1885-1888 I 
1884-1886 I 



1874,1875 
1876-1884 
1882-1884 
1885-1888 
1876-1888 
1877-1879 

1881 
1882-1888 

1886 

1886 
1876-1888 
1884,1885 
1886,1887 
1886-1888 

1877 
1879-1882 
1881,1882 
1882-1885 
1 882-1 R84 
1885-1888 
1885-1887 

1885 
1884-1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1882-1887 
1884-1886 
1885,1886 
1886-1888 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1887,1888 



1876,1877 
1876,1877 
1877-1879 
1879-1888 
1880,1881 

1881-1886 6 
1884-1888 4 



1878-1884 
1887,1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 

1886,1887 
188ft-1888 
1886,1887 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 183 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




MORTON covTHiY— concluded. 

The Richfield Republican 1887,1888 1 

The Great Southwest, Richfield 1887,1888 1 

The TalogaStar ' 1887,1888 I 1 

NEMAHA COUNTY. j 

Seneca Weekly Courier | 1875-1884 10 

Seneca Courier-Democrat 1885,1888 4 

The Seneca Tribune 1879-1888 ; 10 

Our Mission, Seneca i 1885,1886 j 1 

Nemaha County Republican, Sabetha 1876-1888 13 

The Sabetha Advance 1876,1877 2 

Sabetha Weekly Herald 1884-1888 i 5 

The Oneida .Journal 1879-1882 I 3 

The Oneida Chieftain, Democrat, and Dispatch 1883,1884 1 

The Oneida Monitor I 1885,1886 ! 1 

The Wetmore Spectator, (lacking from August, 1884, to August, 1885,) i 1882-1888 ' 5 

The Centralia Enterprize 1883,1884 1 

The Centralia Journal 1885-1888 4 

The Goff's News 1887,1888 [ 1 

NEOSHO COUNTY. 1 

Neosho County Journal, Osage Mission 1876-1888 i 13 

The Temperance Banner, Osage Mission 1878-1880 \ 2 

Neosho Valley Enterprise, Osage Mission , , 1880-1882 ' 2 

The Neosho County Democrat, Osage Mission 1883-1888 5 

Neosho County Record, Erie 1876-1886 U 

The Neosho County Republican, Erie 1884-1886 3 

The People's Vindicator, Erie 1888 1 

Republican-Record, Erie 1886-1888 : 2 

Chanute Times 1876-1888 13 

The Chanute Democrat 1879-1882 3 

The Chanute Chronicle 1882,1883 2 

Chanute Blade 1883-1888 5 

The Chanute Vidette 1887,1888 1 

Head Light, Thayer 1876-1888 13 

The Thayer Herald 1885,1886 1 

Star of Hope, Urbana 1878 \ 1 

i 

NESS COUNTY. i 

The Pioneer, Clarinda & Sidney 1879-1882 3 

The Advance, Sidney ' 1882-1883 1 

Ness City Times 1880-1888 8 

The Truth, Ness City 1883-1884 ; i 

The News, Ness City 1884-1888 4 

The Ness City Graphic 1886 1 

Walnut Valley Sentinel, Ness City 1886-1888 j 2 

The Globe, Schoharie 1883,1884 i 

The Harold Boomer and Record 1887,1888 2 

Nonchalanta Herald 1887,1888 1 

The Bazine Register ^ 1887,1888 j 1 

NORTON COUNTY. | 

Norton County Advance, Norton j 1878-1882 5 

Norton County People, Norton 1880-1883 2 

The Norton Courier 1888-1888 ! 6 

Norton Champion 1884-1888 4 

The Norton Democrat, and Weekly New Era 1886-1888 2 

The Lenora Leader 1882-1888 6 

The Kansas Northwest, Lenora i 1884,1885 1 

The Kansas Monitor, Lenora 1885,1886 1 

The Common People, Lenora 1 1886,1887 ! 1 

The Lenora Record 1887,1888 1 

The Norton County Badger, and"! 

The Edmond Times, Edmond. J 

The AlmenaStar 

Almena Plaindealer 

The Oronoque Magic 



1886-1888 

1885-1888 3 

1888 1 

1886 1 



1868-1888 19 



OSAGE COUNTY. 

Osage County Chronicle, Burlingame, (1872 lacking) 

Osage County Democrat, Burlingame 1881-1887 4 

Burlingame Herald 1881-1884 2 

Burlingame Independent, (changed from Carbondale Calendar, January 28 to April 1, 

1886; Carbondale Independent, Aprils to May 13, 1886, then moved to Burlingame,).... 1886-1888 2 

Burlingame News, amateur 1886-1888 1 

Osage City Free Press 1876-1888 13 

The Kansas Times, Osage City, (moved from Lyndon,) \ 1879-1881 3 

The Osage City Republican 1 1882,1883 1 



/ 



184 



STATE HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Netospapert. 



OSAGE COUNTY — concluded. 

Osage County Democrat, Osage City 

The Kansas People, Osage City 

Kansas People (daily), Osage City 

Lyndon Times 

The Lyndon Journal 

The Lyndon Leader • 

Kansas l^lebeJan, Lyndon and Scranton 



Osage County Times, Scranton. 
The Carbondale Journal. 



Carbondale Indepeudent 

AstonisherA Paralyzer, Carbondale 

The Carbondalian, Carbondale .... 

The CarlMindale Record 

Kansas Workman, Scranton and Quenemo. 

Osage County Republican, Quenemo 

Melvern Record 



OSBORNE COUNTY. 

Osborne County Farmer, Osborne 

The Trulh Teller, Osborne 

Daily News, Osborne 

Osborne County News, Osborne 

Western Odd Fellow (monthly). Osborne 

Osborne County Journal, Osborne 

Bull's City Post 

Osb-jrne County Key, Bull's City 

The Western Empire, Bull's City 

The Western Empire, Alton 

Downs Times 

Downs Chief. 

Portis Patriot 



OTTAWA COUNTY. 

The Solomon Valley Mirror, Minneapolis 

The Sentinel, Minneapolis 

Minneapolis Messenger, (successor to Sentinel,) 

The Daily Messenger, Minneapolis 

Minneapolis Independent 

Ottawa County Index, Minneapolis 

The Progressive Current, Minneapolis 

Solomon Valley I>emocrat, Minneapolis 

The Daily Institute, Minneapolis, Nos. 1 to 20 

Kansas Workman, monthly, Minneapolis 

Minneapolis School Journal 

The Sprig of Myrtle, monthly, Minneapolis 

Ottawa ( ounty Commercial, Minneapolis 

The Delphos Herald 

Delphos Carrier , 

Bennington Star 

The Bennington Journal , 

The Tescott Herald 



PAWNEE COUNTY. 

Larned Press 

The Pawnee County Herald, Larned 

The I.jirned P>nterprise-Chronoscope 

Larned Daily ( hronoscope 

The Larned Optic 

The larned W'eekly Eagle-Optic 

Garfield l^etler 

TheCiarfield News 

TheBurdett Bugle 

Pawnee County Republican 



PHII.I.IPS COUNTY. 

The Kirwin Chief. 

Kirwin Progress and Kirwin Democrat 

The Indei)endent, Kirwin 

Kirwin Republican 

Philllns County Herald, Phillipsburg 

The i'hillipsburg Times 

The Phillipsburg Dispatch 

Phillipsburg Democrat 

Logan Enterprise 

Phillips County Freeman, Logan 

The I.K>gan Republican 

The Long Island Argus 

Long Island leader 

Phillips County Democrat, Long Island 




1886,1887 

1887,1888 

1887,1888 

1876-1879 

1882-1888 

1882,1883 

1882 

1888 

1879 

1B82-1884 

1885-1887 

1887,1888 

1888 

1883-1888 

1886-1888 

1884-1888 

1876-1888 

1880 

1881 

1883-1888 

18^6-1888 

1886-1888 

1880 

1881,1882 

1883-1885 

1885-1888 

1880-1888 

lb86-1888 

1881-1888 



1874-1886 
1876-1883 
1883-1888 

1887 
1876-1881 
1880-1883 
1^83,1884 
1884-1868 

1885 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1879,1880 
1881-1888 
1883-1888 

1885 
1887, 18&8 

1876-1878 
1877,1878 
1878-1888 
1887,1888 
1878-18>^ 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
lb87,1888 
Ib8d-1888 
1886,1887 

1876-1888 
1877,1878 
1880-1888 
1883,1884 
1878-1888 
1^84,1885 
J886-18b8 
18»7,1888 
1879-1883 
1883-1888 



1886-18i>8 
1886 



Sixth Biennial Repobt, 



185 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




PHILLIPS COUNTY— concluded. 

Phillips County Inter-Ocean, Long Island 

Marvin Monitor 

Woodruff Gazette and Republican 

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY, 

Pottawatomie Gazette, Louisville, (vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, and duplicate vol. 1,) 

Kansas Reporter, Louisville 

Pottawatomie County Herald, Louisville 

The Louisville Republican (and The Semi-Weekly Republican) 

The Louisville Indicator 

Weekly Kansas Valley, Wamego 

The Wamego Blade 

The Wamego Tribune 

Kansas A trriculturist, Wamego 

Wamego Democrat 

The Daily Wamegan, Wamego 

St. Marys Times 

St. Marys Democrat 

Pottawatomie Chief, St. Marys 

St. Marys Express 

St. Marys Star 

St. Marys Gazette 

Inkslingers' Advertiser, Westmoreland 

The Weekly Period, Westmoreland 

The Westmoreland Recorder 

The Onaga Journal , 

The Onaga Democrat „ 

Independent and Morning News, Havensville 

The Olsburg New's-Letter 

PRATT COUNTY. 

The Stafford Citizen 

Pratt County Press, luka 

Pratt County Times, luka 

The luka Traveler 

The Saratoga Sun 

Pratt County Democrat, Saratoga 

TheCullisou Banner 

Pratt County Register, Pratt 

The Pratt County Republican, Pratt 

The Preston Herald 

Springvale Advocate 

RAWLINS COUNTY. 

Atwood Pioneer 

Republican Citizen, Atwood 

Rawlins County Democrat, Atwood and Blakeman 

The Atwood .Journal 

The Ludell Settler 

The Celia Enterprise 

The Blakeman Register 

The Herndon Courant 

RENO COUNTY. 

Hutchinson News 

Hutchinson Daily News 

Hutchinson Herald 

The Interior, Hutchinson 

The Interior-Herald, Hutchinson 

Hutchinson Daily Interior-Herald 

The Sunday Democrat, The Dollar Democrat, The Democrat, and Tlie Hutchinson 

Democrat 

The Hutchinson Call (daily) 

The Argosy, Nickerson 

The Nickerson Register 

The Arlington Enterprise 

The Nickerson Daily Register 

The South Hutchinson Leader , 

The Saturday Review, South Hutchinson 

Sylvia Telephone 

The Haven Independent 

The Turon Rustler 

Partridge Cricket and Press 

Lerado Ledger 



1887,1888 
1886,1887 
1886,1887 



1867- 
1870- 

1?82- 
1887, 
1869- 

1877- 
1879- 

1885, 
1887, 
1876, 

1878, 
1880- 
1884- 



1882- 
1885- 
1878- 
1885 
l)-80- 
1887 



1877, 
1878- 
1881- 
1886- 
1885- 
1885, 
1886- 
1886- 

1887, 



1870 

■1887 
1879 
■1886 
18>^8 
1871 
1876 
-1882 
•1888 
1886 
1888 
1877 
1878 
1879 
-1888 
-1888 
1888 
1878 
-1885 
-1888 
-1885 
1887 
-1882 



1878 

1887 

1888 

1888 

1887 

1886 ! 

1888 I 



1888 
1888 1 
1888 



1879-1882 
1880-1888 
1885-1888 

1888 
1884-1887 
1885-1888 
1887-1888 

1888 



1876-1888 
1886-1888 
1876-1885 
1877-1885 
1885-1888 
1887 



1888 
1878-1888 
1884-1888 
1885-1888 

1887 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1886,1887 



186 



STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Continued. 



Newtpapers. 




REPUBLIC COUNTY. 



The Belleville Republic 

The Belleville Telescope 

The Weeklv Record, Belleville., 
The Belleville Democrat 



Scandia lienublic 

The Republic County Journal, Scandia.. 

Republican-Journal, Scandia 

Scandia Journal 

Republic County Independent, Scandia.. 

Republic County Chief, Scandia 

The Scandia Independent 

White Rock Independent , 

Republic City News. 

Conservative Cuban, Cuba 

Republic County Pilot, Cuba 

The Wayne Register 

The Warwick Leader 



RICE COUNTY. 

Rice County Gazette, Sterling 

Sterling Gazette 

Weekly Bulletin, and The Sterling Bulletin 

The Lyons Republican 

The Daily Republican, Lyons 

The Lyons Dailv Republican , 

Central Kansas bemocrat, (1882 and 1883 lacking,) Lyons., 

Central Kansas Democrat, daily, Lyons 

The Lyons Prohibitionist 

The Soldiers' and Lyons Tribune 

The Rural West, Little River 

The Little River Monitor 

The Chase Dispatch 

The Weekly Record, Chase 

The Daily Bulletin, Sterling 

Sterling Republican, weekly 

Sterling Republican, daily 

The Arkansas Valley Times, Sterling 

The Saturday Republican 

Geneseo Herald 

The Raymond Independent 

The Cain City Razzooper 

Partridge Press 

Independent, Frederick , 

The Alden Herald , 



RILEY COUNTY. 

Manhattan Express 

The Kansas Radical, Manhattan, (duplicate of 1867 and 1868,) 

The Manhattan Independent, ( 1865 lacking,) 

The Manhattan Standard, (triplicate of 1869 and duplicate of 1870,). 

Manhattan Homestead ., 

The Nationalist, Manhattan, (eleven duplicates,) 

The Literary Review, Manhattan 

Manhattan Beacon, ( two duplicates,) 

The Industrialist, Manhattan, (twelve duplicates,) 

Manhattan Enterprise 

The Kansas Telephone, Manhattan 

The Manhattan Republic 

Manhattan Daily Republic 

The Independent, Manhattan 

The Mercury, Manhattan 

The Golden Cresset (monthly), Manhattan 

The Journal of Mycology (monthly), ManbatUn 

The Riley Times 

The Independent, Riley Center 

Randolph Echo 

Leonardville Monitor 



ROOKS COUNTY. 

The Stockton News and the Western News, ( except 1881, see Plain ville News,). 

Rooks County Record, Stockton 

Stockton Democrat , 

Stockton Eagle 

The Plain ville News, (moved from Stockton for one year.) 

?he Plainville Press 
Jainville Echo 

Plainville Times '"'. ''"'""!"'"' 



1876 
1876-1888 
1883-1885 
1886-1888 

1877 
1878-1880 

1881 
1882-1888 
1883-1884 
1885,1886 
1887,1888 

1879 
1883-1888 
1884-1886 
1885-1888 
1885-1887 
1886,1887 



1876-1880 
1881-1888 
1877-1888 
1879-1888 

1882 
1887,1888 
1879-1887 
1886,1887 
1885-1888 
1887,1888 
1881,1882 
1886-1888 
1884,1885 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1886,1887 

1887 



1887,1888 

1887,1888 

1887,1888 

1887 

1888 



1860-1862 



1868-1870 
1869-1878 
1870-1888 

1872 
1872-1876 
1875-1888 
1876-1882 
1881-1888 
1882-1888 
1887,1888 

1883 
1884-1888 
1884,1885 
1885-1888 
1887,1888 
1879-1882 
1882-1887 
1884-1888 



1876-1888 
1879-1888 
1885-1888 
1887,1888 
1881 
1885,1886 
1884-1886 



Sixth Biennial Re poet. 



187 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




ROOKS COUNTY — concluded. 



Webster Eagle 

Webster Enterprise 

Woodston Saw and Register. 
Cresson Dispatch 



RUSH COUNTY. 

Rush County Progress, Rush Center, and LaCrosse Eagle. 

LaCrosse Chieftain 

LaCrosse Democrat 

The Blade, Walnut City 

The Herald, Walnut City 

Walnut City Gazette, Rush Center 

The Democrat, Walnut City 

Walnut City News (daily) 

The McCracken Enterprise 



RUSSELL COUNTY. 

Russell County Record, Russell 

Russell County Advance, Russell 

Russell Independent 

The Russell Hawkey e 

Russell Live-Stock Journal, and Russell Journal 

Russell Review, and Democratic Review, Russell 

Bunker Hill Advertiser 

Bunker Hill Banner 

Bunker Hill Banner (second) 

The Bunker Hill News 

Bunker Hill Gazette 

The Dorrance Nugget 

Luray Headlight 



1885-1887 

1888 

1886-1888 

1887,1888 



1877,1878 
1882-1888 
1887,1888 
1878-1882 
1883-1886 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



1876-1888 
1878 
1879-1881 
1882,1883 
1885-1888 
1886-1888 
1880,1881 
1882,1883 
1884,1885 
1887,1888 
1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 



ST. JOHN COUNTY. 



The Oakley Opinion 1885,1886 



The Salina Herald 

Salina Daily Herald 

Saline County Journal, Salina 

Saline County Daily Journal, Salina. 

Farmers' Advocate, Salina 

The Weekly Democrat, Salina 

Svenska Herolden, Salina 

The Salina Independent 

The Salina Republican 

The Rising Sun, Salina 

Brookville Independent 

Brookville Transcript..... 

Brookville Times 

Chico Advertiser 

The Gypsum Banner 

Gypsum Valley Echo 

Assaria Argus 



SALINE COUNTY. 



Western Times, Scott City 

Scott County News, Scott City... 
Scott County Herald, Scott City. 
The Scott Sentinel, Scott City..., 

Grigsby City Scorcher 

The Pence Phonograph 



SCOTT COUNTY. 



SEDGWICK COUNTY. 

Wichita Vidette, (August 25, 1870, to March 11, 1871,).. 

Wichita City Eagle, (1873-1876 lacking,) 

Wichita Daily Eagle 

Wichita Weekly Beacon 

The Wichita Daily Beacon , 

Wichita Herald 

Stern des Westens, Wichita 

National Monitor, Wichita 

Daily Republican, Wichita 

Wichita Republican 

Wichita Daily Times 

Sedgwick Jayhawker and Palladium, Wichita 

The New Republic, Wichita 

Wichita Daily Evening Resident 

The Arrow, Wichita 



1876-1888 
1887,1888 
1876-1888 
1887,1888 
1876-1879 
1878,1879 
1878-1881 
1882-1885 
1886-1888 
1885-1888 
1880 
1881-1888 
1887,1888 
1886,1887 
1886,1887 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 



1885,1886 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1887 
1887.1888 



1870,1871 
1872-1888 
1884-1888 
1874-1888 
1884-1888 
1877-1879 

1879 
1879,1880 
1880,1881 
1880,1881 
1881-1884 
1882,1883 
1883-1888 

1886 
1886-1888 



188 



State Historical Society. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS. KANSAS— Continued. 




Newtpaperi. 



SEDGWICK covJiTY — concluded. 

Kansas Staats- A nzeiger, Wichita 

Wichita Herald 

The Wichita Citizen, Labor Union, Union Labor Press, and Independent 

The Wichita District Advocate 

Sunday Growler, Wichita 

Wichita Dailv Journal 

Wichita Daily Call 

Wichita (Uobe 

Western Evangelist, Wichita 

The Leader, (prohibition,) Wichita, (see Topeka,) 

Cheney Journal 

The Cheney Weekly Blade 

Valley Center News 

The Mount Hope Mentor... 

Clearwater Leader 

TheColwich Courier 

Garden Plain Herald 

SEQUOYAH COUNTY. 

(See Finney County.) 

The Garden City Paper , 

The Irrigator, Garden City 

SEWARD COUNTY. 

The Prairie Owl, Fargo Springs 

Seward County Democrat, Fargo Springs 

The Fargo Springs News 

Springfield Transcript 

Springfield Soap- Box 

Seward County Courant, Springfield 

Seward Independent 

The Arkalon News 

The Liberal Leader 

SHAWNEE COUNTY. 

Daily Kansas Freeman, Topeka, (October 24 to November 7,) 

The Kansas Tribune, Topeka 

Topeka Tribune, (two sets,) 

The Topeka Tribune 

Topeka Daily Tribune, (January 12 to March 1.) 

The Congregational Record, Topeka, (see Douglas county). 

Weekly Kansas State Record, Topeka, (1863-1867 lacking, and 7 duplicates,) 

Daily Kansas State Record, Topeka, (January to June, 1870, lacking) 

Daily Kansas State Record, To|)eka, (duplicates of above) 

Fair Daily Record, Toi)eka, (duplicate volume,) 

The Kansas Farmer, monthly, (Topeka, May, 1833, March and April, 1864; Lawrence, 

January, 1865, to July, 1867; I^eavenworth, September, 1867, to December, 1873; 

Topeka, weekly, 1873 to 1884,) eight duplicates 

Kansas Educational Journal, Topeka, (see Leavenworth county). 

Topeka leader, (1K66 and 18fi7, duplicates,) 

Commonwealth, daily, Topeka, (50 duplicates,) 

The Weeklv Commonwealth, Toj>eka, (13 duplicates,) 

Tanner and O bbler, Topeka '... 

Kansas .Magazine (monthly), Topeka 

Topeka Daily Blade, (1874 not published, 1 duplicate,) 

Topeka Weekly Blade 

Kansas State Journal (daily), Topeka 

Kansas Weekly State Journal, Topeka 

Kansas Democrat, Topeka 

American Young Folks (monthly), Topeka 

Times (daily), Topeka , 

The Kansas Churchman, monthly, Topeka, (1883-1885, Lawrence,) 

Commercial Advertiser, Topeka 

Educational Calendar (monthly), Topeka , 

Colored Citizen, Topeka 

Der Courier, Topeka 

The Daily Capital, Topeka 

Weekly Capital and Farmers' Journal, Topeka , 

Kansas Staats-Anzeiger, Topeka 

The Kansas Methoilist and Kansas Methodist-Chautauqua, Topeka, (monthly 1879,1880 

and weekly 1881-1886,) ; 

The Topeka Tribune 

North Topeka Dailv Argus, and Times 

The Topeka Post (daily) ; , 

The Whim-Wham. Topeka 

]nie Educationist, Topeka 

Western School Journal (monthly), Topeka , 

The Kansas Telegraph, Topeka 



1886-1888 
1><85-1888 
18x6-1888 



18S7, 1888 

1887 

1887 

1887, 18S8 

1888 

1884-1886 

1888 

188.'>-1888 

1885-1888 

1886-1888 

1887, 1>88 

1887, 1888 



1879 



18S6-1888 
18S6-1888 
1886-1888 
18X7, 18S8 
1887, 188H 
1887, lh88 
1888 



1886 
1855-1858 
18)8-1861 
1866, 1867 

1864 

1859-1875 

1868-1871 

1868-1871 

1871 



1863-1888 

1865-1869 
1869-1888 
1874-1888 

1872 
1872, 1873 
1873-1879 
1876-1879 
1879-1888 
1879-1886 
1874-1882 
1876-1882 

1876 
1876-1886 

1877 

1877. 1878 

1878. 1879 
1878-1880 
1879-1888 
18H3-1888 
1879-1881 

1879-1888 
18H0, 1881 
1880, 1881 
1880 
1880,1881 
1880-1884 
1885-1888 
1881-1888 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 



189 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Concluded. 



Newspapers. 



Years. 



SHAWNEE covsTY — concluded. 

Good Tidings, Topeka 1881-1886 

Daily Democrat and Daily State Press, Topeka i 188I 1882 

The Colored Patriot, Topeka 'l882 

The Evening Herald, Topeka 1882 

The Faithful Witness (semi-monthly), Topeka 1882-1886 

The National Workman, Topeka ' 1882 

Saturday Evening Lance, Topeka.. I 1883-1888 

The Kansas Newspaper Union, Topeka | 1883-1888 

The Topeka Tribune , 1883-1885 

Anti-Monopolist, Topeka ; 1883,1884 

The Daily Critic, Topeka 1884 

New Paths in the Far West (German monthly), Topeka 1884,1885 

Light (Masonic monthly), Topeka : 1884-1888 

The Kansas Knight and Soldier (semi-monthly), Topeka 1884-1888 

The Spirit of Kansas, Topeka 1884-1888 

Western Baptist i 1884-1888 

City and Farm Record and Real Estate Journal (monthly), Topeka 1884-1888 

The Kansas Law Journal, Topeka 1885-1887 

The Citizen (daily), Topeka 1885,1886 

The Washburn .Argo ( monthly), Topeka ' 1885-1888 

The Washburn Reporter, Topeka 1887,1888 

The Kansas Democrat (daily), Topeka 1886-1888 

Our Messenger (mouthly), Topeka 1886-1888 

Welcome, Music and Home Journal (monthly), Topeka 1885-1888 

Kansas Home (monthly), Topeka 1886-1888 

The Lantern, Topeka I 18^7,1888 

North Topeka Daily Courier 1887,1888 

Topeka Times, North Topeka, (March, 1873, to February, 1874, lacking,) 1871-1874 

North Topeka Times ' 1876-1885 

The Evening Republic, North Topeka 1882 

North Topeka Mail 1882-1888 

The North Topeka News ! 1888 

News (daily), North Topeka ! 1888 

Kansas Valley Times, Rossville I 1879-1782 

The Rossville News 1883,1884 

Carpenter's Kansas Lyre, Rossville ! 1884-1888 

Silver Lake News 1882 

The Future, monthly, Richland 1885-1887 



SHERIDAN COUNTY. 

Sheridan County Tribune, Kenneth 1881 ,1882 

Weekly Sentinel, Kenneth and Hoxie 1 1884-1888 

Democrat, Kenneth and Hoxie I 1885-18'*8 

Sheridan Times ! 1887,1888 



SHERMAN COUNTY, 

The New Tecumseh, Gandy, Leonard and Itasca 

Sherman County Republican, Itasca, Sherman Center and Goodland. 

Voltaire Adviser 

Sherman County News, Voltaire 

Sherman County Dark Horse, Eustis 

Sherman County Democrat, Eustis 

Sherman Center News, Sherman Center and Goodland 

SMITH COUNTY. 

Smith County Pioneer.Smith Centre , 

The Daily Pioneer, Smith Centre 

The Kansas Free Press, Smith Centre 

Smith County Record, Smith Centre 

Smith County Weekly Bulletin, Smith Centre , 

The Bazoo, Smith Centre 

Gaylord Herald 

The Toiler and Independent, Harlan 

The Harlan Weekly Chief 

The Harlan Advocate 

The Harlan Enterprise 

The Cedarville Telephone •, 

The Cedarville Review 

Cedarville Globe 

The Dispatch, Reamsville 

The Cora Union 

The Lebanon Criterion 

The People's Friend, Reamsville 



STAFFORD COUNTY. 

Stafford County Herald, Stafford 

Stafford County Republican, Stafford , 

The St. John Advance 



1885,1886 
1886-1888 
1885.1886 
1886-1888 
18S6-18S8 
1887,1888 
1886,1887 



1876-1888 
1887,1888 
1879-1881 
1882,1883 
1884-1888 
1885-1888 
1879-1888 
1879,1880 
1884,1885 
1885-1887 
1887,1888 
1883 
1884,1885 
1886-1888 
1884-1886 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 

1879-1886 
1886-1888 



190 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




STAFFORD coWTi — concluded. 

The Sun, St. John 

County Capital, St. John ; 

The Stafford County Bee, Milwaukee 

The Macksville Times 

TheCassody Herald 

The Cassody Mirage 

Stafford County Democrat, Stafford 

The Weekly Telegram, Stafford 

STANTON COUNTY. 

Veteran Sentinel, and Johnson City and Syracuse Sentinel 

The Johnson City World 

Stanton Countv Eclipse, Johnson City 

Johnson Citv Journal 

The Mitchel'lville Courier 

The Border Rover, Borders 

Stanton Telegram, Goguac 

STEVENS COUNTY. 

Hugo Herald, Hugoton 

Hugoton Hermes 

Woodsdale Democrat 

Dormot Enterprise 

The Voorhees Vindicator 

Zella Gazelle and Moscow Review 

SUMNER COUNTY. 

Sumner County Press, Wellington : 

Wellington Daily Press 

Sumner County Democrat, Wellington 

Wellington Semi- Weekly Vidette 

The Wellingtonian, Wellington 

The Wellington Democrat 

Sumner County Standard, Wellington 

Daily Standard, Wellington 

The Daily Postal Card, Wellington 

The Kepublican, Wellington 

The Wellington Monitor , 

Kansas Weather Observer, Wellington 

Wellington Morning Quid Nunc (daily) 

Wellington Quid Nunc 

Wellington Daily Telegram 

Oxford Independent 

Oxford lieflex and Weekly 

The Oxford Register 

Caldwell Post 

Caldwell Journal 

Caldwell Daily Journal , 

Oklahoma War Chief, Wichita, January 12 to March 9, 1883; Geuda Springs, March 28 
to July 19, 1883; Oklahoma Territory, April 26 and May 3, 1884 ; Arkansas City. May 
10, 1884; Geuda Springs, August 30, 1884; South Haven, October 23 to December 4, 
1884; Arkansas City, February 3 to June 11, 1885; Caldwell, June 18, 1885, to August 
12,1886 .:. 

Caldwell Commercial 

Caldwell Standard 

The Free Press, Caldwell 

Times, Caldwell 

The Caldwell News, daily and weekly 

The Industrial Age, Caldwell 

Belle Plaine News 

The Kansas Odd Fellow, Belle Plaine 

The Resident, Belle Plaine 

Mulvane Herald 

Mulvane Record ; 

Geuda Springs Herald 

Argonia Clipper 

Conway Springs Star 

The Weekly News, South Haven 

The South Haven New Era 

THOMAS COUNTY. 

Thomas County Cat, Colby 

The Democrat, Colby 

The Hastings d Brewster Gazette 



1885-1888 
1887,1888 
1882,1883 
1886-1888 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1885-1888 



1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887.1888 



1873-1888 
1886,1887 
1877-1879 
1879 
1881-1885 
1882-1884 
1884-1888 
1887,1888 
1886,1887 



1887,1888 
1887,1888 

1887 
1876-1879 
1880-1881 
1884-1888 
1879-1883 
1883-1888 

1887 



1883-1886 
1880-1883 
1884 
1885,1886 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1879-1888 
1882,1883 
1885,1886 
1880-1882 
1885-1888 
1882-1888 
1884 1888 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 



1885-1888 
1886-1888 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 



191 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS — Continued. 



Newspapers. 



The Wa-Keeney Weekly AVorld. 

Kansas Leader, Wa-Keeney 

Trego County Tribune, Wa-Keeney. 

Globe, Cyrus 

Trego County Gazette, Wa-Keeney.. 



TREGO COUNTY. 



WABAUNSEE COUNTY. 



The Wabaunsee County Herald, Alma 

The Alma Weekly Union 

Wabaunsee County News, Alma 

The Blade, Alma 

Wabaunsee County Herald, Alma 

The Alma Enterprise 

The Land-Mark, Eskridge, (not published from December, 1874, to June 

The Home Weekly, Eskridge 

The Eskridge Star 

Wabaunsee County Democrat, Eskridge 

The Alta Vista Register 



Yeart 



WALLACE COUNTY. 

Wallace County Register, Wallace 

Wallace County News 

Wallace Weekly Herald 

The Western Times, Sharon Springs 

Sharon Springs Leader 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Western Observer, and Washington Republican, (broken files,). 

Washington Republican and Watchman 

Washington Republican 

Washington County Register, Washington 

Washington County Daily Register, Washington 

Weekly Post, Washington 

Washington Daily Post 

Washington Daily Times 

Western Independent, Hanover 

Washington County Sun and Hanover Democrat 

The Hanover Democrat 

Grit, Hanover 

The Clifton Localist 

Clifton .Journal and Review , 

Clifton Review 

The Local News, and The Semi-Weekly News, Clifton 

The Greenleaf .Journal 

The Greenleaf Independent 

The Independent- Journal, Greenleaf 

Greenleaf Journal 

Greenleaf Herald 

The Haddam Weekly Clipper 

The New Era, Haddam 

Palmer Weekly Globe 

Palmer Pioneer 

The Barnes Enterprise 



WICHITA COUNTY. 



Wichita Standard, Bonasa and Leoti City 

Leoti Lance 

Wichita County Democrat, Leoti City 

The Leoti Transcript, Leoti City 

Wichita County Herald, Coronado 

The Coronado Star 

Wichita County Farmer, Coronado, Farmer City and Leoti., 



Wilson County Citizen, Fredonia.. 

Fredonia Tribune 

Fredonia Democrat 

The Times, Fredonia 

Fredonia Chronicle 

Neodesha Free Press 

Neodesha Gazette 

Neodesha Register 

Neodesha Independent 

Altoona Advocate 

The Benedict Echo 

Buffalo Clipper , 

Buffalo Express 

The Coyville Press 



WILSON COUNTY. 



1879-1888 
1879,1880 
1885-1888 
1882,1883 

1887,1888 



1869-1871 
1871,1872 
1876-1888 
1877,1878 
1879-1881 
1884-1888 
1873-1883 
1881-1888 
1883-1888 
1886 
1887,1888 



188G-18S8 
1886,1887 
1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 



1869,1870 
1870,1871 
1876-1888 
1881-1888 
1884, 1885 
1883-1888 

1887 
1887,1888 
1876,1877 

1878 
1878-1888 
1884,1885 

1878 
1878-1880 
1881-1888 
1885-1888 
1881-1883 
1882,1883 
1883-1887 
1887,1888 
1883-1888 
1883-1888 
1886,1887 

1884 

1888 
1885-1888 



1885-1888 
1886,1887 
1886,1887 
1887,1888 
1886,1887 
1886-1888 



1870-1888 
1878,1879 
1882-1888 
1883-1885 
1885-1888 
1876-1882 
1881,1882 
1883-1888 
1887,1888 
1886,1887 
1886-1888 
1887 
1888 
1887,1888 



—13 



1^2 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



BOUND NEWSPAPER FILES AND PERIODICALS, KANSAS— Concltokd. 



Newspapers, 



WOODSON COUNTY. 

Woodson County Post, Neosho Falls 

Neosho Falls Post •••• 

Woodson County Republican and Independent, Neosho Falls, 

Weekly News, Yates Center, and the Yates Center News 

Yates Center Argus 

Woodson Democrat, Yates Center 

The Sun and Independent-Sun, Yates Center 

The Toronto Topic 

Register, Toronto 

WYANDOTTE COUNTY. 

Quindaro Chindowan 

Wyandotte Gazette, (1869 and 1873 lacking,) 

The Kansas Citv Daily Gazette 

Wyandotte Herald, (1873 lacking,) 

The Kawsmouth Pilot, Wyandotte 

Equitable Aid Advocate (monthly), Wvandotte 

Wyandotte Republican (daily and weekly) 

The Wvandotte Chief. 

Kansas Pionier, Wyandotte 

The Pioneer, Kansas City, Kansas 

The Kansas Pilot, Kansas Citv, Kansas 

The Stock Farm and Home Weekly, Kansas City, Kansas 

The Spy, Kansas City, Kansas 

The Globe and the Sun and Globe, Kansas City, Kansas 

Light, Kansas City, Kansas 

The Kansas Weekly Cyclone, Kansas City, Kansas 

The Wasp, Rosedale 

Rosedale Record 

Argentine Republic 

The Argentine Advocate 

Cromwell's Kansas Mirror, Armourdale 



Years. 



1873-1888 


10 


1883-1888 


6 


1886,1887 


1 


1877-1888 


12 


1882,1883 


2 


1884-1888 


4 


1886-1888 


2 


1883-1888 


5 


1886,1887 


^ 


1857,1858 


1 


1866-1888 


19 


1887,1888 


4 


1872-1888 


16 


1881 


1 


1881-1883 


3 


1881,1882 


2 


1883,1885 


2 


1883-1888 


5 


1878-1880 


3 


1879,1881 


2 


1880 


1 


1881,1882 


1 


1884,1886 


2 


1884-1886 


1 


1887,1888 


1 


1884,1885 


1 


1888 


1 


1887,1888 


1 


1888 


1 


1887,1888 


1 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, ETC., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES. 



Newspapers. 




ALABAMA. 

The Nationalist, Mobile 

ARIZONA. 

Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner, Prescott 

CALIFORNIA. 

Overland Monthly, San Francisco, f. s 

Overland Monthly, San Francisco, s. s , 

San Francisco Weekly Post , 

The Alaska Appeal, San Francisco , 

The Pacific Rural Press, San Francisco , 

California Patron and Agriculturist, San Francisco 

American Sentinel, Oakland 

Signs of the Times, Oakland 

Pacific Health Journal (monthly), Oakland 

COLORADO. 

Silver World, Lake City 

Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver , 

The Rocky Mountain Presbvterian, Denver and Cincinnati 

The Gunnison Review (weekly) 

The Gunnison Daily and Trl-Weekly Review-Press 

Mountain Mail, Sallda , 

Denver Dally Tribune , 

Grand Junction News 

White Pine Cone 

The Denver Republican (daily) 

The Queen Bee (monthly), Denver , 



1866-1868 
1887,1888 



1868-1875 
1883-1888 
1879-1888 
1879,1880 
1882-1888 



1886-1888 



1877-1888 
1878-1888 
1879-1880 
1880,1881 
1882-1888 
1880-1888 
1884 
1884 
1884-1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



Sixth biennial Report, 



193 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, ETC., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES — Continued. 



Newspapers. 



Yean 



CONNECTICUT. 

The Connecticut Courant, Hartford 1796-1799 3 

Middlesex Gazette, Middletown, 1804, 1805 and 1817 1804-1817 I 3 

Siliman's Journal of Science and Arts, New Haven, vols. 1, and 37 to 48 1818-1869 13 

Quarterly Journal of Inebriety, Hartford 1876-1888 12 

Travelers' Record (monthly), Hartford 1886-1888 : 3 



Dakota Teacher, Huron, August, 1885, to June, 
Bismarck Weekly Tribune 



DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA. 



1885,1886 
1887,1888 



Kendall's Expositor, Washington 1841 

The National Era, Washington 1847-1859 

The Council Fire, Washington 1879-1882 

The Alpha, Washington i 1881-1888 

The Washington World | 1882-1884 

National Tribune ! 1883,1884 

United States Government publications, monthly catalogue, Washington I 1885-1888 

The Official Gazette of the United States, Patent Office, Washington I 1885-1888 

Public Opinion, Washington and New York 1887, 



The Florida Dispatch, Jacksonville., 



GEORGIA. 

Southern Industrial Record (monthly), Atlanta.... 
Atlanta Constitution 



ILLINOIS. 

Eeligio- Philosophical Journal, Chicago 

The Inter-Ocean, Chicago 

Semi-Weekly Inter-Ocean, Chicago 

Faith's Record (monthly), Chicago 

Commercial Advertiser, Chicago 

Industrial World and Commercial Advertiser, Chicago 

Industrial World and Iron Worker, Chicago 

American Antiquarian (quarterly), Chicago 

Weekly Drovers' Journal, Chicago , 

The Standard, Chicago 

Farmers' Review, Chicago 

Chicago Journal of Commerce 

National Sunday School Teacher (monthly), Chicago 

Land Owner, Chicago 

Chicago Advance, (files for 1872, 1873, 1874, 1875, 1877, 1879, 1884, and one duplicate,)., 

The Dial, Chicago 

Brown and Holland's Short-Hand News (monthly), Chicago 

The Watchman (semi-monthly), Chicago 

The Weekly Magazine, Chicago 

The New Era, Chicago 

The Odd Fellows' Herald, Bloomington 

The Weekly News, Chicago 

The Western Plowman, Moline 

The Grange News, River Forest 

Svenska Amerikanaren, Chicago 

The Unitarian (monthly), Chicago 

The Union Signal, Chicago 

The Penman's Gazette (monthly), Chicago and New York 

Pravda (monthly), Chicago 

The Western Trail (monthly), Chicago 

Gaskell's Magazine (monthly), Chicago 

The Open Court, Chicago 

The Comrade (bi-monthly), Chicago 

The National Educator (monthly), Chicago 

The Chicago Express 



INDIAN TEKRITaRY. 



The Cherokee Advocate, Tahlequah , 

The Cheyenne Transporter, Darlington. 
Indian Chieftain, Vinita 



INDIANA. 

Indiana State Journal, Indianapolis 

Our Herald, La Fayette 

The Millstone and The Corn Miller (monthly), Indianapolis. 

Mennonitische Rundschau, Elkhart 

Indiana Student (monthly), Bloomington 



1885-1888 
1887,1888 



1868-1877 
1874-1881 
1879-1888 
1874-1881 
1877-1879 
1880-1882 
1882-1888 
1878-1888 
1879-1888 
1880-1888 
1880,1881 

1881 
1869-1881 
1870-1873 
1872-1884 
1881-1888 
1882-1885 
1882-1888 
1882-1885 
1883,1884 
1883-1888 
1884-1886 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1885-1888 
1886,1887 
1886-1888 

1886 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 

1888 



1881-1888 
1883-1886 
1884-1888 



1878-1888 
1882,1883 
1884-1888 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 



194 



STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, ETC., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES— Continued. 



Newtpapert. 




IOWA. 

DsTenport Gazette • 

The Weekly Hawk-Eye, Burlington 

The Burlington Hawk-Eye (daily) 

The Iowa Historical Society (quarterly), Iowa City 

KENTUCKY. 

Weekly Courier-Journal, Louisville 

Southern Bivouac (monthly), Louisville 

LOUISIANA. 

South-Western Christian Advocate, New Orleans 

The Times-Democrat (daily). New Orleans 

MAINE. 

Oxford Observer, Paris — 

Oxford Democrat, Paris 

Maine Advertiser, Norway 

MARYLAND. 

Johns Hopkins University Circular, Baltimore, (1882-1884 lacking,) 

Jottings (monthly), Baltimore 

The American Journal of Psychology, Baltimore, (quarterly) 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

The Boston Chronicle, Dec. 21, 1767, to Dec. 19, 1768 

Federal Orrery, Boston, Oct. 20, 1794, to April 18, 1796, and scattering duplicates from 
Oct. 20, 1794, to Oct. 12, 1795 

Massachusetts Mercury, Boston, May 11, 1798, to Aug. 9, 1799 

The Independent Chronicle and the Universal Advertizer, Boston, from Jan. 1, 1798, to 
Dec. 17, 1801 

The Independent Chronicle, Boston, Dec. 21, 1801, to Dec. 80, 1804 

Boston Patriot, from April 7, 1809, to Sept. 12, 1810; from March 2 to Dec. 25, 1811; from 
March 14, 1812, to Sept. 8, 1813; and scattering duplicates from March 3, 1809, to 
March 10, 1813 

Independent Chronicle and Boston Patriot (semi-weekly), Jan. 11, 1832, to Aug. 10, 1837.. 

Columbian Centinel and Massachusetts Federalist, Boston, from June 29, 1799, to Aug. 
31, 1805; from Jan. 3, 1807, to Oct. 3, 1810; from Jan. 2, 1811, to July 1, 1812; and 
scattering duplicates from Feb. 28, 1801, to Dec. 29, 1802 

Boston Gazette, from Jan. 9 to Oct. 29, 1804; from Aug. 19, 1815, to Aug. 19, 1816; from 
Dec. 27, 1817, to Dec. 25, 1819: from April 23, 1827, to Nov. 28, 1828 

Boston Commercial Gazette (daily), from Dec. 29, 1817, to Dec. 25, 1819 

Massachusetts Si)y or Worcester (iazette 

The National ^gis, Worcester, Dec. 2, 1801, to Dec. 25, 1811 ; from Jan. 20, 1813, to May 
4, 1814; from Jan. 5, 1815, to Dec. 25, 1816; from Dec. 15, 1824, to June 8, 1825; and 
years 18i5, 1830,1838-1840 

Boston Spectator, from Jan. 4, 1814, to Feb. 5, 1815 

North American Review, Boston, (Nos. 3-6, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 19, 20, 21 and 130 lacking,) 
1879 18S0 1888 

Essex Register, Saieni, from JanV'l to De^^ ........!....'..! , 

The Missionary Herald, Boston, vols. 17-80 

The Massachusetts Spy (weekly), Worcester 

New England Galaxy, Boston, from Oct. 31, 1823, to Dec. 26, 1828; and scattering dupli- 
cates from Oct. 15, 1824, to April 6, 1827 

Christian Examiner, Boston, vols. 1-19, 1824-1836, and 12 vols, between 1840 and 1867 

Boston Recorder, from Jan. 2, 1832, to Dec. 25, 1835 

The Liberator, Boston, (lacking 1834-1837 and 1839,) 

Evening Journal, Boston, from Jan. 3, 1837, to Dec. 30, 1843; from Jan. 4 to Dec. 30, 1844; 
and from Feb. 4 to Dec. 30, 1845 , 

The Commonwealth (daily), Boston, Jan. 1 to July 3, 1851 ; and from Jan. 1 to Sept. 21, 
1854 

The Commonwealth, Boston, from Sept. 1, 1866, to Aug. 28, 1869 

Youth's Companion, Boston, from Oct. 21, 1852, to April 17, 1856, and 1886-1888 

Dally Transcript, Worcester, from Feb., 1853, to Dec, 1855 

Evening Telegraph (daily), Boston, from Sept. 27, 1854, to March 31, 1855 , 

Quarterly Journal of American Unitarian Association, Boston 

Monthlr Journal of the American Unitarian Association, Boston 

Anglo-Saxon, Itoston, from Jan. 5 to Dec. 16, 1856 , 

The Atlantic .Monthlv, Boston, vols. 1-50 , 

The Atlas and Daily bee, Boston, from June 15 to Dec. 31, 1868 

Worcester Daily Spy, from Jan. to Dec, 1859; from Jan., 1868, to Dec, 1884; and from 
July, 1885, to Julv, 1886 

Worcester Evening Gazette, from Jan. to Dec, 1866; from Jan., 1867, to July 18, 1881; 
and from Jan., 18S2, to Dec, 18S5 

Zion's Herald, Boston, (1868, 1869,1870,1879, 1880, 1883,) 

Banner of Light, Boston 

Worcester Daily Press, from June, 1873, to Dec, 1876 

Boston Journal of Chemistry 

iEgls and Gazette, Worcester, (part of 1877 lacking,) ' i 



1878 
1881-1885 
1882-1885 
1885-1888 

1878-1880 
1886, 1887 



1879-1888 



1824-1826 
1871-1876 
1872-1875 



1879-1888 
1887,1888 



1767,1768 



1794-1796 
1798-1799 



1798-1801 
1801-1804 



1809-1813 
1832-1837 



1799-1812 

1804-1828 
1817-1819 
1805, 1806 



1801-1825 
1814, 1815 

1815-1888 
1817 

1821-1884 
1822 

1823-1828 
1824-1868 
1832-1835 
1833-1865 

1837-1845 

1851-1854 
1866-1869 
1852-1888 
1853-1855 
1854, 1865 
1864-1859 
•1860-1869 

18.56 
1857-1882 

1858 



1868-1885 
1868-1883 
1869-1872 
1873-1876 
1873-1877 
1875-1880 



Sixth biennial Repobi. 



195 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, ETC., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES — Continued. 



Newspapers. 



MASSACHUSETTS — Concluded. 
The New England Historical and Genealogical Register (quarterly), Boston 

The Woman's Journal 

Harvard University Bulletin (quarterly) 

Civil Service Record, Boston 

United States Official Postal Guide (monthly), Boston 

Our Dumb Animals (monthly), Boston 

Science, Cambridge, (see New York,) 

The Citizen (monthly), Boston 

The Evening Traveller (daily), Boston, from January to June, 1886 

The Popular Science News, Boston 

The Unitarian Review and Religious Magazine, Boston , 

Political Science Quarterly, Boston 

Abolitionist, Boston 

The Writer (monthly), Boston 

The Estes & Lauriat Book Bulletin (monthly), Boston 

American Teacher (monthly), Boston 

Evening Gazette, Boston 

The New Jerusalem Magazine (monthly), Boston 

Spelling (quarterly), Boston 

Library Notes (monthly), Boston 

Martha's Vineyard Herald, Cottage City 




MICHIGAN. 

The Fireside Teacher (monthly), Battle Creek ! 1886-1882 

The Unitarian, Ann Arbor 1887,1888 



MINNESOTA. 

Pioneer-Press, St. Paul and Minneapolis 



The Western Journal, (and Civilian, monthly), St. Louis 

Organ and Reveille, St. Louis 

St. Joseph Free Democrat 

American Journal of Education (monthly), St. Louis 

Kansas City Times, daily, ( 1875 lacking,) 

The Great Southwest (monthly), St. Louis, vols. 1,2,3,6 and 7 .... 

St. Joseph Herald, daily, (1878 and to July, 1879, lacking,) 

St. Joseph Herald 

St. Joseph Gazette 

The Kansas City Review of Science and Industry, monthly 

Weekly Journal of Commerce, Kansas City 

Kansas City Daily Journal 

Mirror of Progress, Kansas City 

Kansas City Price Current 

Santa Fe Trail (monthly), Kansas City, volume 1, number 1 to 

Camp's Emigrant Guide to Kansas, Kansas City 

Fonetic Teacher (monthly), St. Louis, volume 2 

American Home Magazine, Kansas City 

The Communist and Altruist (bi-monthly), St. Louis 

Kansas City Live-Stock Indicator 

The Mid-Continent, Kansas City 

Svenska Herolden, Kansas City 

Western Newspaper Union, Kansas City 

The Centropolis, Kansas City 

American Journalist (monthly), St. Louis 

The Kansas City Medical Index 

Kansas City Live-Stock Record and Price Current 

The Kansas City Record 

Missouri and Kansas Farmer, Kansas City 

The Kansas City Star, daily 

The Faithful Witness (monthly), Kansas City 

The Herald, Kansas City 

The Kansas Magazine (monthly), Kansas City 

The St. Louis Evangelist 

St, Louis Globe-Democrat, daily 

The Central Christian Advocate, St. Louis 

The Evening News, Kansas City 

Kansas City Daily Traveler 



NEBRASKA. 

The Western Newspaper Union, Omaha 

The Woman's Tribune (monthly and weekly), Beatrice., 

Western Resources (monthly), Lincoln 

Nebraska State Journal (daily), Lincoln 

Nebraska State Journal, Lincoln 



1848-1854 
1851 
1860 
1873-1888 
1873-1888 
1874-1880 
1876-1888 
1877-1888 
1877-1888 
1877-1884 
1877-1879 
1879-1888 
1879-1881 
1880,1881 
1880,1881 
1880-1884 
1881 
1881,1882 
1881-1888 
1882-1888 
1882-1888 
1882-1884 
1883-1888 
1883-1888 
1883-1885 
1884-1888 
1884-1888 
1885-1888 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1886,1887 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1888 
1888 
1888 



1886-1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



196 



State histobical Society. 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, ETC., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES — Continued. 



Newspapers. 



NEW JERSEY. 




The Journal of American Orthoepy (monthly), Ringos 1884-1888 

Orchard & Garden (monthly), Little Silver 1887,1888 



NEW MEXICO. 

Santa F6 New Mexican 

Albuquerque Weekly Journal 

Mining World, Las Vegas 

New Mexican Mining News, Santa F6 

Las Vegas Weekly Optic 

The Santa Fe Weekly Leader 

The Daily Citizen, Albuquerque 

Daily New Mexican, Santa FC 



NEW YORK. 

New York American, New York City 

Evangelical Magazine, Utica, (vols. 2 and 3,) 

Evangelical Magazine and Gospel Advocate, Utica, (vols. 4, 5, and 9, 1833, 1834 and 1838,) 

The Anti-Slavery Record, New York 

The Emancipator, New York, (from February 3, 1837, to February 14, 1839,) 

The New-Yorker, New York 

The Jeffersonian, Albany 

The Diamond, New York 

The Northern Lieht, Albany 

Workingman's Advocate, New York 

New York F>angelist 

Scientific American, New York, (lacking from 1861 to 1884,) 

New York Daily Tribune, ( lacking from 1870 to 1874, and from 1876 to 1879,) 

New York Semi-Weekly Tribune, (lacking 1876, 1883, 1884,) 

New York Weekly Tribune, (lacking 1871-1878,) 

Propagandist, New York 

The Home Missionary, New York 

Harper's Monthly Magazine, New York 

Harper's Weekly, New York 

New York Illustrated News 

The Industry of All Nations, New York 

Putnam's Monthly, New York 

Daily Times, New' York, (incomplete,) 

The Phonographic Intelligencer, New York 

The Printer, New York , 

New York Independent, New York, (1874 duplicate,) 

U. S. Service Magazine (monthly). New York , , 

The Galaxy ( monthly). New York 

American Agriculturist (monthly), New York, (lacking 1862-1866,) 

The Revolution, New York , 

The Spectator, New York and Chicago , 

Scribner's Monthly and the Century Magazine, New York , 

Popular Science >Ionthly, New York 

Fruit Recorder and Cottage Gardner, Palmyra 

The Christian Union, New York 

The Iron Age, New York 

The Librarjr Journal (monthly), New York , 

The Magazine of American History (momthly), New York ,..., 

Brown's Phonographic Monthly, New York 

The National Citizen and Ballot Box, (from May, 1878, to October, 1881,) New York, (see 

Ballot Box, Ohio,) ,. ....^ 

The Cultivator and Country Gentleman, Albany 

The Daily Register, New York 

America, New York 

The Sheltering Arms (monthly). New York !....!......!...!!....!...*.'.""'! 

The Union, Hrooklvn 

The Bee Keepers' Exchange (monthly), Canajoharie !!!...."!..!!!!.. 

The Publishers' Weekly, New York 

The American Mi8.«ionary, New York !!."".*!!...! 

The Nation, New York " 

John Swinton's Paper, New York ..!.....!......!! 

Appleton'8 Literary Bulletin (bi-monthly). New York .'..'*..'"'.*.'.*.*.'.*. 

Phonetic Educator, New York and Cincinnati 

The Literary News, New York '/.] 

The Student's Journal (phonographic monthly), New York ...."....!!.!..".***.' 

The Phonographic World (monthly), New York 

New York Weeklv Witness 

The Irish World, New York !..."..!!!!*.*.!."!.*'.!!.*.'".".'.*.*,*.*"" 

The Christian Advocate (from April, 1885, to Dec. 30, 1886), New York !.....*.'.'."'.'.!!."!!.*!."!!!.' 

The Cooperative Index to Periodicals (quarterly). New York 

The Protestant Episcopal Mission Leaf (monthly), New York 

The National Temperance Advocate, New York 

Science, New York 



1881-1883 
1881-1886 
1880-1882 
1881-1883 
1883,1884 
1885,1886 
1887,1888 
1887,1888 



1827,1828 
1828,1829 
1833-1838 

1836 
1837-1839 
1837^1840 
1838,1839 
1840-1842 
1841-1843 
1844,1845 
1845-1847 
1849-1888 
1849-1888 
1871-1887 
1869-1884 
1850,1851 
1850-1888 
1851-1854 
1857-1888 

1853 

1853 
1853-1867 
1854-1856 

1857 
1858-1863 
1869-1887 
1864-1866 
1866,1877 
1860-1869 
1868-1870 
1870-1880 
1870-1888 
1872-1885 
1874-1876 
1874-1887 

1876 
1876-1888 
1877-1888 
1878-1883 

1878-1881 
1879,1880 
1879-1888 
1879-1881 
1879-1888 
1879-1882 
1879-1882 
1879-1888 
1880-1888 
1882-1888 
1883-1887 



1884,1885 
1884-1888 
1885-1888 
1885-1888 
1885-1888 
1885,1886 
1885-1888 
1886 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 



Sixth Biennial Be poet. 



197 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, ETC., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES — Continued. 



Newspapers. 




NEW YOUVi — concluded. 

The American Book-Maker (monthly), New York 

The New Princeton Review (semi-monthlj-), New York city. 

The Husbandman, Elmira 

Sabbath Reading, New York 

The Delineator (monthly). New York 

Electrical Review, New York 

Scribner's Magazine (monthly). New York., 



1885,1886 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1886-1888 
1886 
1886-1888 
1887,1888 

Agricultural Science (monthlv), New York 1887,1888 

The Swiss Cross (monthlv), New York 1887,1888 

The Voice, New York 1887,1888 

The Decorator and Furnisher (monthly), New York 1887,1888 

The Public Service Review (monthly). New York 1887,1888 

Home Knowledge (monthly), New York 1887,1888 

Judge, New York 1888 

New York Pioneer 1 1887,1888 

The Curio, New York I 1887,1888 

Demorest's Monthly, New York ! 1888 

Tariff League Bulletin, New York i 1888 

Library Bulletin of Cornell University (monthly) I 1887,1888 

Political Science Quarterly, New York I 1886-1888 



OHIO. 

The Ohio Cultivator, Columbus 

Weekly Phonetic Advocate, Cincinnati 

Phonetic Advocate Supplement, Cincinnati 

The Masonic Review 

Typeof the Times, Cincinnati 

American Phonetic Journal, Cincinnati 

The Crisis, (from January 31, 1861, to January 23, 1863,) Columbus 

The Ballot Box, from June 1876, to May 1878, Toledo, (see National Citizen, New York)., 

Nachrichten aus der Heidenwelt, Zanesville 

Cincinnati Weekly Times 

The Phonetic Educator, Cincinnati 

The Christian Press, Cincinnati 

The American Journal of Forestry, Cincinnati 

The Christian Standard, Cincinnati 

Magazine of Western History (monthly), Cleveland 

Farm and Fireside (semi-monthly), Springfield 

The American Grange Bulletin, Cincinnati 

Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, Columbus 

Phonographic Magazine (monthly), Cincinnati 



1845,1846 
1850-1853 
1850-1852 
1853-1862 
1854,1855 

1858 
1861-1863 
1876-1878 
1877-1880 
1878-1888 
1878-1883 
1880-1888 
1882-1883 
1883-1888 
1884-1888 
1884-1888 

1886 
1887-1888 

1887 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

The American Naturalist, Philadelphia 

The Press (daily), Philadelphia 

Progress, Philadelphia 

Public Ledger (daily), Philadelphia 

Faith and Works (monthly), Philadelphia 

Eadle Keatah Toh — The Morning Star and the Red Man, 



I 1867-1880 

, 1878-1880 

: 1878-1885 

i 1879-1888 

I 1879-1888 

Carlisle \ 1881-1888 

1879-1886 
1880-1888 
1883,1884 



Sunday School Times, (files for 1879, 1880, 1884, 1885, 1886), Philadelphia 
Naturalist's Leisure Hour (monthly), Philadelphia.. 

Historical Register, (vols. 1 and 2), Harrisburg 

The Farmer's Friend, Mechanicsburg \ 1886-1888 

Dye's Government Counterfeit Detector, Philadelphia i 1886-1888 

The Building Association and Home Journal (monthly), Philadelphia 

The Book Mart (monthly), Philadelphia 

Paper and Press (monthly), Philadelphia 

American Manufacturer and Iron World, Pittsburg 



TEXAS. 

Live-stock .Journal, Fort Worth 1882-1888 

Texas Wool Grower, Fort Worth 1882,1883 

El Paso Times (daily) I 1883 

Texas Review (monthlv), Austin 1886 

The Canadian Free Press 1887,1888 

The Canadian Crescent 



VERMONT. 



The Woman's Magazine (monthly), Brattleboro. 
The National Bulletin (monthly), Brattleboro... 



VIRGINIA. 

The Richmond Standard 

Southern Workman and Hampton School Record, Hampton. 



Whatcom Reveille. 



WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 



1885-1888 
1886,1887 



1880,1881 



1884-1885 



1887,1888 

1887,1888 

1888 

1888 



198 ISTATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



BOUND NEWSPAPERS, ETC., OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES — Concluded. 



Newspapers. 



Years. 



WISCONSIN. 

Wisconsin State Journal, Madison 

Western Farmer and Wisconsin Grange Bulletin, Madison 

ENGLAND. 

London Illustrated News 

Diplomatic Review, (vols. 1-25,) London 

The Fonetic Journal, Bath 

The Labour Standard, London 

Forestry, a magazine for the country (monthly), Edinburgh and London 

FRANCE. 

Bulletin de la Soci^tfi Protectrice des Animaux (monthly), Paris 

Bulletin de la Soci6t6 de Geographic, Paris 

Socit-tti de Geographie compte rendu des Stances de la Commission Centrale (semi- 
monthly), Pans 

Chronique de la Soci6t6 des Gens de Lettres (monthly), Paris 

Bulletin Mensuel de la Soci6t6 des Gens de Lettres, Paris 

Bulletin des Stances de la Socifitg Nationale d' Agriculture (monthly), Paris 



1878-1888 
1886 



1842-1879 
1855-1877 
1879 
1882-1884 
1884,1885 



1878-1882 
1878-1888 

1882-1888 
1879-1888 
1878-1880 
1879-1886 



KANSAS NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS NOW RECEIVED. 

The following is a list of the newspapers and periodicals published in 
Kansas, corrected up to January 1, 1889. The regular issues of these, with 
very few exceptions, are now being received by the Kansas State Historical 
Society. They are the free gift of the publishers to the State. They are 
bound in annual or semi-annual volumes, and are preserved in the library 
of the Society in the State Capitol for the free use of the people. They 
number 827 in all. Of these 45 are dailies, 1 is semi-weekly, 733 week- 
lies, 40 monthlies, 1 is semi-monthly, 2 are bi-monthlies, 4 are quarterlies, and 
1 is occasional. They come from all of the 106 counties of Kansas, and 
record the history of the people of all the communities and neighborhoods. 

ALIiEN COUNTY. 

The Humboldt Union, Republican; W. T. McElroy, publisher and proprietor, 
Humboldt. 

The Humboldt Herald, Democratic; S. A. D. Cox, editor and publisher, Hum- 
boldt. 

The lola Register, Republican; W. W. Scott, publisher, lola. 
Allen County Courant, Democratic; J. C. Hamm & Bro., publishers and propri- 
etors, lola. 

The Moran Herald, Republican; G. D. IngersoU, editor and proprietor, Moran. 

AMDEBSON COUNTY. 

Garnett Weekly Journal, Democratic; J. T. Highley, publisher, Garnett. 

The Republican-Plaindealer, Republican; Anderson County Republican Company 
and Howard M. Brooke, publishers, Garnett. 

The Garnett Eagle, Republican; W. A. Trigg, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Garnett. 

The Greeley News, neutral; W. O. Champe, editor, Greeley. 

The Colony Free Press, Republican; J. J. Burke, editor, Colony. 

Westphalia Times, independent; Adele D. Reed, editor and proprietor, Misses 
Adele D. and Bertie Reed, publishers, Westphalia. 

The Kincaid Dispatch, Republican; J. E. Scruggs and J. G. Cash, publishers, 
Kincaid. 



Sixth biennial be poet. 199 



ATCHISON COUNTY. 

The Atchison Champion, (daily and weekly,) Republican; John A. Martin, pro- 
prietor, Alf. H. Martin, business manager, Atchison. 

Atchison Patriot, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; C. S. Wilson, editor, R. B. 
Drury, business manager, Patriot Publishing Company, publishers, Atchison. 

Atchison Globe, (daily and weekly,) independent; Edgar W. Howe & Co., editors 
and proprietors, Atchison. 

The Atchison Times, Union Labor; J. A. Sunderland, publisher, Atchison. 

The Messachorean, Midland College, (monthly,) educational; W. B. Glanding, 
managing editor, Atchison. 

Muscotah Record, Republican; L. H. and Chas. Miller, editors and proprietors, 
Muscotah. 

The Effingham Times, independent; Wilson Cohoon and Coleman Martin, editors 
and proprietors, Effingham. 

The Prairie Press, Democratic; W. C. Adkins, publisher, Lancaster. 

BAEBER COUNTY. 

Medicine Lodge Cresset, Republican; L. M. Axline, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Medicine Lodge. 

The Barber County Index, Democratic; E. P. Caruthers, editor and proprietor. 
Medicine Lodge. 

The Hazelton Express, Republican; W. A. E. Adams, editor and publisher. Hazel- 
ton. 

The Kiowa Herald, Democratic; J. E. Hall, editor and publisher, Kiowa. 

The Kiowa Journal, Republican; W. C. Charles and D. A. Woodworth, editors and 
publishers, Kiowa. 

The Union, Democratic; J. D. Youart, editor and proprietor. Sun City. 

The Lake City Bee, independent; A. B. Hoffman, editor and proprietor, Lake City. 

BAKTON COUNTY. 

The Great Bend Register, Republican ; R. A. Charles, editor, E. L. Chapman, 
proprietor, Great Bend. 

Great Bend Tribune, Republican ; C. P. Townsley, editor and proprietor. Great 
Bend. 

Barton County Democrat, Democratic; Will E. Stoke, editor and proprietor. 
Great Bend. 

The Ellinwood Advocate, Democratic ; J. D. Quillen, editor, Ellinwood. 

Pawnee Rock Leader, Republican ; M. E. Heynes, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Pawnee Rock. 

BOUEBON COUNTY. 

Fort Scott Monitor, (daily and weekly), Republican ; John H. Rice, editor, W. M. 
Rice, associate editor, R. P. Rice, business manager, H. V. Rice, traveling solicitor. 
Fort Scott. 

Fort Scott Tribune, (daily and weekly,) Democratic ; J. B. Chapman, editor. Fort 
Scott. 

Fort Scott Weekly Globe, Union Labor ; H. L. Burdett and A. L. Preston, pub- 
lishes, Fort Scott. 

The Bronson Pilot, neutral ; W. M. Holeman, proprietor, Bronson. 

The Fulton Independent, independent; A. W. Felter, editor and proprietor, Fulton. 

The Telephone, Republican ; G. J. McQuad, editor and proprietor. 

BEOWN COUNTY. 

Brown County World, Republican; D. W. Wilder, editor and proprietor, Ewing 
Herbert, associate editor and manager, Hiawatha. 



200 STATE HISTOBIGAL SOCIETY. 



The Kansas Democrat, Democratic; George T. Williams, editor and publisher, 
Hiawatha. 

Horton Headlight, Republican; Harley W. Brundige and Samuel E. Bear, editors 
and publishers, Horton. 

The Horton Gazette, Republican; Charles C. Bartruff, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Horton. 

Horton Commercial, Democratic; Clyde McManigal, editor, J. S. Sherdeman and 
Clyde McManigal, publishers, Horton. 

The Horton Railway Register, Republican; C. N. Whitaker, managing editor, 
Harry Whitaker, city editor, Horton. 

The Everest Enterprise, independent; T. A. H. Lowe, editor and business man- 
ager, T. A. H. Lowe and J. B. Green, publishers, Everest. 

Fairview Enterprise, independent; S. O. Groesbeck, editor, Fairview. 

BUTLEB COUNTY. 

The Augusta Journal, Republican; W. J. Speer, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Augusta. 

Walnut Valley Times, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Alvah Shelden, editor, pub- 
lisher and proprietor. El Dorado. 

El Dorado Republican, Republican; T. B. Murdock, editor and proprietor. El Do- 
rado. 

Butler County Jeflfersonian, Democratic; J. B. Crouch, editor and proprietor. 
El Dorado. 

Douglass Tribune, Republican; J. M. Satterthwaite, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Douglass. 

The Leon Indicator, Republican; C. R. Noe, editor and publisher, Leon. 

The Herald, independent; E. Davis, jr., editor, publisher and proprietor, Towanda. 

Latham Signal, Republican; Tom C. Copeland, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Latham. 

The Brainerd Ensign, Republican; R. P. Morrison, editor, publisher and propri- 
prietor, Brainerd. 

Potwin Messenger, neutral; J. M. Worley, publisher, Potwin. 

CHASE COUNTY. 

Chase County Courant, Democratic; W. E. Timmons, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Cottonwood Falls. 

Chase County Leader, Republican; William A. Morgan, editor and publisher, 
Cottonwood Falls. 

Chase County Republican, Republican; W. Y. Morgan, editor and proprietor, 
Strong City. 

CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY. 

The Sedan Times- Journal, Republican; Adrian Reynolds, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Sedan. 

The Sedan Graphic, Democratic; A. D. Dunn, publisher, Sedan. 

The Weekly Call, Republican; F. M. Gwyn, editor and publisher, Peru. 

Chautauqua Springs Express, neutral; W. J. Wright, editor and publisher, Chau- 
tauqua Springs. 

The Cedar Vale Star, independent; F. G. Kenesson, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Cedar Vale. 

CHEBOKEE COUNTY. 

The Columbus Star-Courier, Democratic; N. T. Allison and W. P. Eddy, editors 
and proprietors, Columbus. 



Sixth biennial Befobt. 201 



The Columbus Advocate, Republican; A. T. Lea & Son, editors, publishers and 
proprietors, Columbus. 

Baxter Springs News, neutral, M. H. Gardner, editor and publisher, Baxter 
Springs. 

Short Creek Republican, Republican; L. C. Weldy, editor and proprietor. Galena. 

Galena Miner, Union Labor; J. F. McDowell, publisher. Galena. 

The Western Friend, (monthly,) religious; Cyrus W. Harvey, editor, Varck. 

Weir City Tribune, independent; Wm. Hawley, editor, The Tribune Printing 
Co. publishers and proprietors, Weir. 

Weir City Eagle, Republican; John McKillop, editor and manager, Weir City. 

CHEYENNE COUNTY. 

Cheyenne County Rustler, Republican; C. E. Denison, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, St. Francis. 

The Plaindealer, Democratic; C. F. Woodward, editor, Plaindealer Publishing 
Co., publishers, St. Francis. 

Bird City News, Republican; Geo. W. Murray, editor and publisher, Bird City. 

Cheyenne County Democrat, Democratic; Will C. Hydon, editor and manager. 
Bird City. 

CLABK COUNTY. 

Clark County Clipper, Democratic; John I. Lee editor, Lee Bros, publishers and 
proprietors, Ashland. 

Ashland Weekly Journal, Republican; Charles C. Moore and Myron G. Stephen- 
son editors and proprietors, Ashland. 

The Englewood Enterprise, neutral; J. R. Axsom, editor and proprietor, Engle- 
wood. 

The Englewood Chief, Republican; J. M. Grasham, editor, J. M. Grasham and G. 
S. Watt, publishers, Englewood. 

CLAY COUNTY. 

The Dispatch, Republican; E. J. Bonham and J. B. Palmer, editors, J. B. Palmer, 
manager. Dispatch Publishing Company, publishers. Clay Center. 

The Times, Republican; J. P. Campbell and D, A. Valentine, €>ditors, owners and 
publishers. Clay Center. 

Republican Valley Democrat, Democratic; R. O. Lewis, editor. Democrat Publish- 
ing Co., publishers. Clay Center. 

The Clay County Sentinel, Republican; C. W. Hoyt, editor and publisher, Morgan- 
ville. 

The Herald, Republican; E. P. Ellis, editor and proprietor, Chas. H. Jones, local 
editor and business manager, Oak Hill. 

The Echo, Republican; J. C. Cline, editor, Frank A. Cline, publisher, Oak Hill. 

Wakefield Advertiser, Democratic; J. J. L. Jones, editor, Wakefield. 

CLOUD COUNTY. 

Concordia Empire, Republican; T. A. Sawhill, editor and proprietor, Concordia, 

Kansas Weekly Blade, Republican; J. M. Hagaman, publisher, Concordia. 

The Concordia Times, Republican; T. A. Filson, editor and publisher; S. Z. Filson, 
associate editor, Concordia. 

Weekly Daylight, Democratic; E. Marshall & Co., editors and proprietors, Con- 
cordia. 

The Clyde Herald, Republican; J. B. and M. L. Rupe, editors and proprietors, 
Clyde. 



202 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

The Clyde Argas, Republican; Chas. A. Morley and Owen V. Smith, editors and 
publishers, Clyde. 

The Glasco Sun, independent; Miss Katie Hubbard, editor and proprietor, Glasco. 

The Mil ton vale News, Republican; J. C. Cline, editor and proprietor, Miltonvale. 

The Kansan, Republican; James and Mary L. Burton, editors, publishers and 
proprietors, Jamestown. 

The Quill, Republican; W. W. Pinkerton, proprietor; Mark G. Woodrufif, associate 
editor, Jamestown. 

COFFEY COUNTY. 

Burlington Republican and Patriot, Republican; C. O. Smith, editor, publisher 
and proprietor, Burlington. 

The Burlington Independent, Democratic; John E. Watrous, publisher, Burling- 
ton. 

The Burlington Nonpareil, Republican; Brown Printing Company, publishers, 
Burlington. 

LeRoy Reporter, independent; Frank Fockele, publisher and proprietor, LeRoy. 

The Lebo Light, neutral; F. M. Burnham, editor and proprietor, Lebo. 

Waverly News, independent; L. E. Smith, publisher and proprietor, Waverly. 

The Gazette, Union Labor; Dan K. Swearingen, publisher, Burlington. 

COMANCHE COUNTY. 

The Western Star, Democratic; W. M. Cash, editor and proprietor, Coldwater. 

The Coldwater Review, Democratic; Review Publishing Company, publishers, 
Coldwater. 

Coldwater Echo, Republican; E. G. Phelps, editor, J. E. Hutchison, publisher, 
Coldwater. 

Coldwater Enterprise, Republican; N. S. Mounts, editor, Geo. W. Newman, pub- 
lisher. Mounts & Newman, proprietors, Coldwater. 

The Leader, Democratic; Joe H. Carter, editor. Protection. 

COWLEY COUNTY. 

The Winfield Courier, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Ed. P. Greer, editor, 
Frank H. Greer, oity editor, Winfield. 

Winfield Telegram, Democratic; J. R. Clark, editor and proprietor, Winfield. 

Saturday Evening Tribune, Republican; E. B. Buck, editor. Tribune Company, 
publishers, Winfield. 

The Winfield Visitor, (daily and weekly,) independent; A. L. Schultz and M. L. 
Harter, editors, publishers and proprietors, Winfield. 

The American Nonconformist, Union Labor; H. Vincent, editor, J.H.Randall, 
associate editor, H. and L. Vincent, publishers and proprietors, Winfield. 

Republican Traveler, (daily and weekly,) Republican; T. W. Eckert, editor, T. W. 
Eckert and R. A. Howard, publishers, Arkansas City. 

Arkansas Valley Democrat, Democratic; T. Mclntire, editor, C. M. Mclntire, 
local editor, L. M. M'Intire, publisher, Arkansas City. 

Canal City Dispatch, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; Geo. W. Wagner and B. 

A. Wagner, editors and publishers, Arkansas City. 

The Fair Play, Union l!.abor; W. B. Wagner, editor and proprietor, Arkansas 
City. 

The Burden Enterprise, Republican; W. L. Button, editor, W. K. McComas, pub- 
lisher and proprietor. Burden. 

Burden Eagle, Republican; J. G. and J. H. Crawford, editors and proprietors, 
Burden. 

The Udall Record, Republican; W. H. Hornaday, editor and publisher, Udall. 



Sixth Biennial Bepobt. 203 



The Cambridge News, Republican; A. V. Wilkinson, editor, Samuel B. Sherman, 
Henry F. Hicks, and A. V. Wilkinson, proprietors, Cambridge. 

Atlanta Cricket, Republican; Milo A. Copeland, publisher, Atlanta. 

Dexter Free Press, independent; P. W. Craig, editor and publisher, Dexter. 

OEAWFOBD COUNTY. 

The Girard Press, Republican; E. A. W^asser and Dudley C. Flint, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Girard. 

The Girard Herald, Union Labor; W. A. Bailey, editor and proprietor, Girard. 

The Cherokee Sentinel on the Border, Republican; F. W. Doughty and Willis 
Swank, publishers, Cherokee. 

Pittsburg Smelter, Republican; John P. Morris, editor, Pittsburg. 

The Pittsburg Headlight, (daily and weekly,) Republican; W^m. Moore & Son 
(C. W. Moore), editors and publishers, Pittsburg. 

Pittsburg Democrat, Democratic; G. S. McCartney, publisher, Pittsburg. 

The McCune Times, Republican; Alfred Jett, editor and publisher, McCune. 

Walnut Journal, Republican; H. Quick and Martin, editors, publishers and 

proprietors. Walnut. 

The Arcadian, Republican; Willis Swank, editor, publisher and proprietor, Law- 
rence Galliher, local editor and business manager, Arcadia. 

Arcadia Democrat, Democratic; J. M. Swan, editor, J. M. Swan and J. C. Pasley, 
proprietors, Arcadia. 

The Hepler Banner, Republican; Henry F. Canutt, editor, H.F. Canutt and Son, 
publishers, Hepler. 

DAVIS COUNTY. 

The Junction City Union, Republican; W. C. Moore, editor, John Montgomery 
and E. M. Gilbert, publishers, Junction City. 

The Junction City Tribune, Union Labor; John Davis, editor, Chas. S. Davis, as- 
sociate editor and business manager, John Davis & Sons, proprietors, Junction City. 

The Junction City Republican, Republican; Geo. A. Clark, editor, publisher and 
proprietor. Junction City. 

Insurance Messenger, (monthly;) G. F. Little, editor and proprietor, M. L. Little, 
associate editor. Junction City. 

DEOATUB COUNTY. 

Oberlin Herald, Democratic; Fred. L. Henshaw, editor and proprietor, Oberlin. 

Oberlin Opinion, Republican; F. W. Casterline, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Oberlin. 

The Eye, Republican; C. Borin, editor; Eye Publishing Company, publishers, 
Oberlin. 

The Oberlin Farmer, (monthly,) agricultural; G. Webb Bertram, editor and pro- 
prietor, Oberlin. 

The Norcatur Register, neutral; H. H. Hoskins, editor and publisher, Norcatur. 

The Jennings Times, Democratic; John Shields and Lewis, editors, Jennings. 

Jennings Echo, Republican; J. W. Page and R. M. Day, editors, publishers and 
proprietors, Jennings. 

DICKINSON COUNTY. 

Abilene Weekly Chronicle, Republican; R. B. Claiborne, editor, publisher and 
proprietor. Chronicle Publishing Company, publishers, Abilene. 

The Abilene Gazette, Democratic; the Gazette Printing Company, publishers, 
Abilene. 

Abilene Reflector, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Chas. M. Harger, city editor, 



204 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Richard Waring, business manager, Reflector Publishing Company, publishers, Ab- 
ilene. 

Dickinson County News, Democratic; B. F. Strother, editor, Strother Bros., pub- 
lishers, Abilene. 

Solomon Sentinel, Republican; E. B. Burnett, editor and publisher, Solomon City. 

The Enterprise Independent; Enterprise Publishing Company, publishers, En- 
terprise. 

The Kansas Miller and Manufacturer, (monthly,) manufacturing interests; C. B. 
Hoffman, editor, W. T. Hopkins, business manager. Enterprise. 

The Hope Herald, Republican; Geo. Burroughs, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Hope. 

Hope Dispatch, Republican; A. M. Crary, editor, M. C. Hemenway, proprietor, 
Hope. 

The Herington Tribune, neutral; V. C. Welch and Frank I. Sage, publishers, 
Herington. 

The Herington Headlight, Republican; Tom Gallagher, publisher, Herington. 

The Chapman Courier, independent; J. H. Engle, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor. Chapman. 

The Manchester Sun, neutral; A. 8. Green, editor, Manchester. 

DONIPHAN COUNTY. 

The Weekly Kansas Chief, Republican; Sol. Miller, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Troy. 

The Troy Times, Republican; F. L. Finch, editor and publisher, W. H. Finch» 
proprietor, Troy. 

White Cloud Review, neutral; Sanders Bros., publishers, White Cloud. 

DOUGLAS COUNTY. 

The Evening Tribune, (daily,) Republican; 0. E. Learnard, publisher and pro- 
prietor, H. M. Greene, editor, Lawrence. 

Lawrence Journal, (daily and weekly,) Republican; O. E. Learnard, publisher and 
proprietor, H. M. Greene, editor, Lawrence. 

Die Germania, (German,) Edward Griin, publisher, Lawrence. 

The Lawrence Gazette, Democratic; Osbun Shannon, editor. Gazette Publishing 
Co., publishers, Frank L. Webster, manager, Lawrence. 

The University Review, (monthly,) educational; V. L. Kellogg, editor-in-chief ^ 
W. T. Caywood and A. L. Wilmoth, business managers, Kansas University Publish- 
ing Co., publishers, Lawrence. 

The Weekly University Courier, educational; Richard Horton, editor-in-chief^ 
Courier Co., publishers, Chas. H. Johnson, president, E. C. Esterly, secretary, P. T. 
Foley, printer, Lawrence. 

University Times, educational; Edgar Martindale, editor-in-chief, C. E. Street 
and J. Frank Craig, business managers, Lawrence. 

Delta of Sigma Nu, (bi-monthly,) college society magazine; Grant W. Harrington^ 
managing editor, Lawrence. 

The Progressive Educator, (monthly,) educational; Prof. J. A. Stotler, editor and 
proprietor, Lawrence. 

The College Review, Business College, (quarterly;) E. Mcllravy, editor, Lawrence 
Business College, publishers, P. T. Foley, printer, Lawrence. 

Baldwin Ledger, Republican; W. H. Finch, editor, Baldwin. 

The Baker University Index, (monthly,) educational; C. K. Woodson, editor-in- 
chief, J. A. Hyden, jr., business manager. College literary societies, publishers, Law- 
rence. 



Sixth Biennial re poet, 205 



College Echo, (monthly,) educational; F. P. Jacoby, editor, Lane University, 
publishers, Lecompton. 

The Eudora News, neutral; M. R. Cain, editor and proprietor, Eudora. 

EDWAKDS COUNTY. 

The Weekly Kinsley Mercury, Republican; W. S. Hebron, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Kinsley. 
. Weekly Banner-Graphic, Democratic; J. M. Springer, editor, Kinsley. 

ELK COUNTY. 

The Howard Courant, Republican; Asa, Tom. E. and John A. Thompson, editors, 
publishers and proprietors, Howard. 

The Howard Democrat, Democratic; James Robert Hall, editor and publisher, 
Howard. 

The Broad Axe, Union Labor; Harry E. Bird, editor and publisher, Howard. 

The Longton Times, independent; Geo. M. Flory, editor and publisher, Longton. 

Moline Mercury, Republican; Geo. C. Armstrong, editor and proprietor, Moline. 

The Grenola Chief, Union Labor; Brice E. Davis, editor and proprietor, Grenola. 

Kansas Weekly Ledger, Republican; William Root, editor and publisher. Elk 
Falls. 

ELLIS COUNTY. 

Hays City Sentinel, Republican; W. P. Montgomery, manager and publisher. Hays 
City. 

Free Press, (semi-weekly,) Republican; Harry Freese, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Hays City. 

Democratic Times, Democratic; G. W. Sweet, editor and publisher, Hays City. 

The Republican, Republican; George P. Griffith, editor. Hays City. 

The Ellis Headlight, Republican; Edgar M. Baldwin, editor and publisher, Ellis. 

The Ellis Review, neutral; Frank J. Brettle, editor and publisher, Ellis. 

ELLSWOBTH COUNTY. 

Ellsworth Reporter, Republican; Geo. Huycke, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Ellsworth. 

Ellsworth Democrat, Democratic; G. A. Coilett and F. S. Foster, editors and 
publishers, Ellsworth. 

The Weekly Herald, Republican; H. D. Morgan, editor, Ellsworth. 

The Wilson Echo, Republican; 'S. A. Coover, editor, Coover & Hutchison, pro- 
prietors, C. S. Hutchison, foreman, Wilson. 

Wilson Eagle, Democratic; R. J. Coffey, editor, Wilson. 

The Kanopolis Journal, Republican; R. V. Morgan, editor and publisher, Kan- 
opolis. 

The Holyrood Enterprise, Republican; M. G. Woodmansee, editor and proprie- 
tor, Holyrood. 

FINNEY COUNTY. 

Finney County Democrat, Democratic; L. H. Barlow and M. B. Hundley, editors 
and publishers, Garden City. 

Garden City Sentinel, (daily and weeily,) Republican; J. W. Gregory, publisher 
and proprietor, Garden City. 

Garden City Weekly Herald, Republican; J. S. Painter, editor, W. W. Wallace, busi- 
ness manager, Herald Printing Company, publishers, Garden City. 

The Terry Eye, Democratic; E. L. Stephenson, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Terry. 

The Hatfield News, neutral; M. B. Crawford <fe Co., proprietors, Hatfield. 



206 STATE HISTOBIGAL SOCIETY. 



FOBD OOUNn. 

The Dodge City Times, Democratic; Noal Edwards and E. L. Mendendall, editors 
and proprietors, Dodge City. 

Dodge City Weekly Democrat, Democratic; Joe. W. Trimble, editor, Dodge City. 

Our Methodist, (monthly,) religions; Rev. A. P. George, editor and publisher, 
Dodge City. 

Ford County Republican, Republican; R. E. Deardofif, editor; M. W. Sutton and 
Rush E. Deardoff, proprietors. Dodge City. 

Speareville Blade, Republican; T. B. Stewart &. Co., editors and proprietors; E. L. 
Smith, local editor, Speareville. 

Ford Gazette, Republican; C. D. Baxter, editor, publisher and proprietor. Ford. 

The Bucklin Herald, Democratic; T. G. Hunter, editor and proprietor, Bucklin. 

The Weekly Telegram, Republican; M. D. Stroup, editor; and M. D. Stroup and 
Charles Eckley, publishers, Bloom. 

The Bucklin Journal, Republican; E. L. Coen, editor; R. T. Roby, publisher, 
Bucklin. 

FBANKLIN COUNTY. 

Ottawa Journal and Triumph, Union Labor; E. H. Snow, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Ottawa. 

The Ottawa Republican, (daily and weeky,) Republican; Geo. T. Anthony, editor, 
A. T. Sharpe, publisher, Ottawa. 

The Queen City Herald, Democratic; J. B. Kessler, editor, publisher and propri- 
etor, Ottawa. 

The Kansas Lever, Prohibition; E. W. Frick and Frank Muth, Ottawa Printing 
Company, publishers and proprietors, Ottawa. 

The Ottawa Campus, (monthly,) collegiate; William J. Cowell, editor-in-chief, 
J. W. Griffith, business manager, Ottawa University Oratorical Association, publish- 
ers, Ottawa. 

The Eagle, Republican; T. W. Fields, editor, publisher and proprietor, Williams- 
burg. 

Wellsville Exchange, neutral, Mrs. L. A. Fields, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Wellsville. 

The Pomona Enterprise, neutral; T. L. Newoomb, editor, Enterprise Publishing 
Company, publishers, Pomona. 

GABFIELD COUNTY. 

Bavanna Chieftain, Republican; W. F. Ellsworth, editor, Ravanna. 

Ravanna Record, Democratic; Thos. A. Davies, publisher, Ravanna. 

Garfield County Call, Independent Democratic; E. L. Cline, editor and proprie- 
tor. Eminence. 

The Garfield County Journal, independent; S. J. Myers, editor, C. F. Hoadley, pub- 
lisher and proprietor, Loyal. 

OOVE COUNTY. 

Grainfield Cap Sheaf, Independent Democratic; C. M. and E. L. M'Clintock, ed- 
itors, and publishers, Grainfield. 

Gove County Gazette, Democratic; E. J. Eillean, editor. Gazette Printing Com- 
pany, publishers, Gove City. 

Gove County Republican, Republican; J. E. Hart, editor, W. J. Lloyd, 'publisher, 
Gove City. 

The Settlers' Guide, Republican; S. W. Baker, editor, J. H. Baker, manager, 
Quinter. 



Sixth Biennial Re poet. 207 



GBAHAM COUNTY. 

The Millbrook Times, Republican; Benj. B. F. Graves and Merritt L. Graves, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Millbrook. 

Graham County Democrat, Democratic; Louis M. Pritchard and Milt. L. Singrey, 
editors and publishers, Millbrook. 

The Hill City Reveille, Republican; H. D. Clayton, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor. Hill City. 

Hill City Democrat, Democratic; J. F. Stewart and H. Kampmeier, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Hill City. 

Hill City Star, Republican; J. H. Wright and H. S. Hogue, publishers, Hill City. 

Hill City Sun, Union Labor; T. H. McGill, editor, publisher and proprietor. Hill 
€ity. 

The Fremont Press, Democratic; E. E. Bright and R. S. Stout, editors and pro- 
prietors, Fremont. 

The Bogue Signal, Republican; F. F. McBride, editor and proprietor, Bogue. 

GEANT COUNTY. 

Grant County Register, Democratic; Herbert L. Gill, editor and proprietor, 
Ulysses. 

The Tribune-Commercial, Republican; John M. Ruckman and Geo. W. Perry, 
editors, publishers and proprietors, Ulysses. 

Golden Gazette, Democratic; J. A. Harman, editor, publisher and proprietor, J. 
O. Johnson, associate editor. Golden. 

Shockeyville Plainsman, Republican; T. R. Hornaday, editor and proprietor, 
Shockey. 

GRAY COUNTY. 

The Jacksonian, Democratic; E. S. Garten, editor and manager, Jacksonian 
■Printing Company, publishers and proprietors, Cimarron. 

New West Echo, Republican; N. B. Klaine, editor, S. S. Logan, business manager, 
New West Printing Company, publishers, Cimarron. 

The Montezuma Chief, Democratic; J. H. Hebard, editor and manager. Chief 
Publishing Company, publishers, T. B. Pyles, proprietor, Montezuma. 

Ingalls Union, independent; R. H. Turner, editor. Union Publishing Company, 
publishers, Ingalls. 

GEEELEY COUNTY. 

The Horace Champion, Republican; Clarke H. White and Henson B. Lemmon, 
proprietors, Horace. 

The Horace Messenger, Democratic; A. J. Hunter and A. C. Fulkerson, editors 
and proprietors, Horace. 

The Greeley County Enterprise, Democratic; Carter Hutchinson, editor and 
manager, Tribune. 

Greeley County Republican, Republican; J. M. Hawkins, publisher, Tribune. 

GEEENWOOD COUNTY. 

The Eureka Herald, Republican; Z. Harlan, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Eureka. 

The Greenwood County Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; W. E. Doud, 
editor and proprietor, Eureka. 

Democratic Messenger, Democratic; T. W. Morgan, editor, Eureka. 

The Madison News, Republican; W. O. and V. E. Lunsford, editors and proprie- 
tors, Madison. 

—14 



208 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



The Severy Record, Republican; Geo. H. Doad, editor, Geo. H. Doud and H. W. 
Bailey, proprietors, Severy. 

The Kansas Clipper, Democratic; C. E. Wainscott, editor and proprietor, Severy. 

Fall River Times, Union Labor; J. A. Somerby, editor, Fall River. 

Saturday Morning Sun, neutral; J. H. Morse, editor and proprietor, Fall River. 

HAMILTON COUNTY. 

The Syracuse Journal, Republican; H. N. Lester, editor, G. W. Reed, businesa 
manager, Journal Publishing Company, publishers, Syracuse. 

Syracuse Sentinel, Republican; Will C. Higgins and Ed. V. Higgins, managing 
editors and proprietors, Sentinel Company, publishers, Syracuse. 

The Democratic Principle, Democratic; F. M. Dunlavy, editor and proprietor, 
T. S. Hurd, associate editor, Syracuse. 

The Kendall Boomer, Democratic; Henry Block, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Kendall. 

The Coolidge Citizen, Republican; O. H. Knight and J. H. Borders, editors and 
proprietors, Coolidge. 

The Coolidge Times, Democratic; L. I. Purcell, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Coolidge. 

HABPEB COUNTY. 

The Anthony Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; George W. Mafifet, 
editor, publisher and proprietor; Lafe. Merritt, city editor, Anthony. 

Harper County Enterprise, Democratic; T. H. W. McDowell, editor, publisher 
and proprietor; W. L. Hutchinson, general business manager, Anthony. 

Anthony Journal, Republican; J. R. Hammond, editor; Anthony Journal Co., 
publishers, Anthony. 

The Harper Sentinel, Democratic; J. L. Isenberg, editor and publisher, Harper. 

The Prophet, Union Labor, , editor and manager, Harper. 

Harper Normal School and Business College Journal, (monthly,) educational; 
R, W. Ball, editor and publisher, Harper. 

The Harper Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; M. A. Hull, editor and 
publisher, Harper. 

The Attica Advocate, Republican; L. A. Hoffman, editor; Hoffman &. Son, (A. B.,) 
publishers and proprietors, Attica. 

Freeport Leader, Republican; Mervin O. Cissel, publisher, Freeport. 

Bluff City Herald, Republican; James Glover, editor and proprietor. Bluff City. 

The Crisfield Courier, independent; B. Wilson, editor; Henry Anderson andL. B. 
Wilson, proprietors, Cristield. 

HARVEY COUNTY. 

The Newton Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Noble L. Prentis, editor; 
Newton Publishing Company, publishers, Newton. 

Newton Kansan, Republican ; Charles H. Kurtz, editor and proprietor, Newton. 

Newton Anzeiger, German; C. D. Heinrich, editor and publisher, Newton. 

The Kansas Commoner, Union Labor; J. R. Rogers, editor, B. E. Kies, business 
manager, Newton. 

The Newton Weekly Journal, Democratic; John A. Reynolds, publisher, Newton. 

The Halstead Independent, Republican; Joe F. White, editor and proprietor, 
Halstead. 

The Burrton Graphic, Republican; M. L. Sherpy, editor and proprietor, Burrton. 

The Sedgwick Pantagraph, Republican: Cash M. Taylor, editor and publisher, 
Sedgwick. 



Sixth biekkial repobt. 209 



HASKELL COUNTY. 

The Ivanhoe Times, Democratic; T. B. Pyles, editor, Times Publishing Com- 
pany, publishers, Ivanhoe. 

The Santa Fe Leader, Democratic; C. R. Cravens, editor. Leader Publishing 
Company, publishers, Santa Fe. 

The Santa F^ Monitor, Republican; J. W. Richardson, editor and publisher, 
Santa F6. 

HODGEMAN COUNTY. 

Jetmore Reveille, Republican; Roando C. Orndorflf, managing editor, H. Orn- 
dorfiP, proprietor, Jetmore. 

The Jetmore Weekly Scimitar, Democratic; William J. Fuller, editor and mana- 
ger, Jetmore. 

Jetmore Sif tings, Republican; L. C. Miller, editor and proprietor, Jetmore. 

Jetmore Journal, Republican; E. E. Hood, editor, S. A. Sheldon, proprietor, Jet- 
more. 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

The Holton Weekly Recorder, Republican; M. M. Beck, editor and proprietor, 
Holton. 

The Holton Weekly Signal, Democratic; W. W. Sargent, editor and proprietor, 
Holton. 

The Normal Advocate, (monthly,) educational; E. J. Hoenshel, editor and pro- 
prietor; J. J. Rippetoe, associate editor, Holton. 

The Whiting Weekly News, Republican; J. S. Clark, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor. Whiting. 

Soldier City Tribune, neutral; A. P. Shaw, publisher. Soldier. 

JEFFEESON COUNTY. 

The Oskaloosa Independent, Republican; F. H. Roberts, editor and publisher, 
Oskaloosa. 

Valley Falls New Era, Republican; A. W. Robinson, editor and proprietor. Valley 
Falls. 

The Valley Falls Register, Democratic; T. W. Gardner, editor and publisher. Val- 
ley Falls. 

Lucifer, (The Light Bearer,) Liberal; Moses Harmon, editor and publisher. Val- 
ley Falls. 

Fair Play, Liberal; E. C. Walker, editor, E. C. Walker and Lillian Harmon, 
publishers. Valley Falls. 

The Winchester Herald, Republican; Oscar C. Kirkpatrick, publisher, Winchester. 

The Nortonville News, Republican; Robert A. Wright, editor and proprietor, 
Nortonville. 

Meriden Report, Democratic; John Gish and John Groshong, editors and pub- 
lishers, Meriden. 

ThaMcLouth Times, Republican; A. B. Mills, editor and publisher, McLouth. 

JEWELL COUNTY. 

Jewell County Monitor, Republican; R. F. Vaughan, editor and proprietor, 
Mankato. 

Jewell County Review, Republican; S. M. Weed, editor and proprietor, Mankato. 

Kansas Labor Clarion, Union Labor; J. Dunton, editor and proprietor, Mankato. 

The Jacksonian, Democratic; George W. Reed, editor, S. S. Mason, publisher, 
Mankato. 



210 STATE Historical Society. 



Jewell County Republican, Republican; Benjamin Musser and W. C. Palmer, 
publishers, Jewell City. 

Burr Oak Herald, Republican; H. F. Faidley, editor and proprietor. Burr Oak. 

JOHNSON COUNTY. 

The Olathe Mirror, Republican; H. A. Perkins, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Olathe. 

The Kansas Patron, Grange; Geo. Black, editor, H. C. Livermore, manager, John- 
son County Cooperative Association, publishers, Olathe. 

The Kansas Star; published by the pupils of the Deaf and Dumb Institution, 
Olathe. 

The Olathe Baptist Builder, (monthly,) religious; R. P. Stephenson, editor and 
publisher, Olathe. 

Spring Hill New Era, Prohibition; J. W. Sowers, editor. Spring Hill. 

The Johnson County Democrat, Democratic; David Hunt, publisher, Olathe. 

KEABNEY COUNTY. 

The Kearney County Advocate, Republican; C. O. Chapman, editor and proprie- 
tor, Lakin. 

Lakin Pioneer Democrat, Democratic; John T. Griffith, editor and publisher, 
Lakin. 

Hartland Herald, Democratic; Jos. Dillon, editor and proprietor, Hartland. 

Kearney County Coyote, Democratic; Lon. Whorton, editor and proprietor, 
Hartland. 

The Standard, Democratic; Jo. W. Merifield, editor, Hartland. 

KINGMAN COUNTY. 

Kingman County Democrat, Democratic; W. A. Eaton, editor and publisher, 
Kingman. 

The Kingman Courier, (daily and weekly), Republican; J. Malcom Johnston, 
editor, J. A. Maxey, business manager, C. M. Bay, publisher, Kingman. 

Kingman Leader, Republican; Morton Albaugh, editor, Kingman. 

Voice of The People, Union Labor; C. L. Swartz, editor, N. V. Van Patten, man- 
ager, Kingman. 

Norwich News, Republican; J. O. Graham, editor and publisher, Norwich. 

The Cunningham Herald, independent Republican; J. Geo. Smith, editor and 
publisher, Cunningham. 

The Spivey Dispatch, independent; Al. D. Krebs and W. J. Krebs, editors and 
proprietors, Spivey. 

The Spivey Index, neutral; Geo. W. Kelley, editor, B. V. Kelley, publisher, Spivey. 

KIOWA COUNTY. 

The Kiowa County Signal, Republican; Will. E. Bolton, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Greensburg. 

Greensburg Rustler, Democratic; S. B. Sproule, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Greensburg. 

Kiowa County Times, independent; H. B. Graves, editor, Coke Eberly, publisher, 
Greensburg. 

Wellsford Reformer, Democratic; 8. W. Herring, editor, W. S. Neal, proprietor, 
Wellsford. 

Haviland Tribune, Union Labor; Will. S. Neal, proprietor, Haviland. 



Sixth biennial repobt. 211 



LABETTE COUNTY. 

The Parsons Sun, (daily and weekly,) Republican; H. H. Lusk, editor, publisher 
and proprietor. Parsons. 

The Parsons Eclipse, (daily and weekly,) independent; J. B. Lamb & Sons, (C. L. 
and Lamb,) editors and proprietors, Parsons. 

Parsons Palladium, Democratic; Will W. Frye, editor, Frank W. and Will W. Frye, 
publishers and proprietors. Parsons. 

The Weekly Clarion, Republican; A. H. Tyler, editor, and business manager, L. K. 
Sheward, publisher and proprietor, Parsons. 

The Chetopa Advance, Republican; J. M. Cavaness, editor, Chetopa. 

Chetopa Statesman, Union Labor; Nelson Abbott, editor, Chetopa. 

The Chetopa Democrat, Democratic; J. J. Rambo, publisher, Chetopa. 

The Oswego Independent, Republican; Nelson Case, editor, Mrs. Mary McGill, 
publisher, W^. F. McGill, local editor, Oswego. 

Labette County Democrat, Democratic; J. M. Landis, editor and publisher, Os- 
wego. 

The Oswego Bee, (daily and weekly,) Union Labor; Wright, Macon & Company, 
publishers, J. H. Macon, business manager, Oswego. 

The Mound Valley Herald, Republican; W. F. Thrall, editor and publisher. Mound 
Valley. 

Altamont Sentinel, independent; Mrs. Lizzie Newlon, publisher, C. S. Newlon, pro- 
prietor, Altamont. 

The Wilsonton Journal, neutral; Mrs. Augustus Wilson, editor and proprietor, E. G. 
Gushing, associate editor and manager, Wilsonton. 

LANE COUNTY. 

Lane County Herald, Democratic; J. C. Riley, jr., editor; Riley & Egger, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Dighton. 

The Dighton Journal, Republican; Ben L. Green, editor and proprietor; H. E. 
Woolheater, local editor, Dighton. 

Lane County Republican, Republican; M. H. Curts, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Dighton. 

LEAVENWOBTH COUNTY. 

The Leavenworth Times, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Z. A. Smith, editor, 
A. C. Lamborn, manager, Leavenworth Times Publishing Company, publishers, 
Leavenworth. 

The Standard, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; T. A. Hurd, president, Edward 
Carroll, secretary, Frank T. Lynch, treasurer and manager, Leavenworth. 

The Sun, (daily,) independent; Sun Publishing Company, publishers, Leaven- 
worth. 

Leavenworth Post, (German,) independent; Max Gronefeld, editor, Franz F. 
Metschan, publisher, Leavenworth. 

The Kansas Catholic, religious; John O'Flanagan, editor, Kansas Catholic Pub- 
lishing Company, publishers, Leavenworth. 

The Home Record, (monthly,) charitable; Mrs. C. H. Gushing, editor. Home for 
the Friendless, publishers, Leavenworth. 

The Orphan's Friend, (monthly,) charitable; Mrs. Thomas Carney, editor and 
business manager, Mrs. DeForest Fairchild, associate editor, Leavenworth. 

The Lance, independent; James Paddock, editor and publisher, Leavenworth. 

Central Business College Journal, (monthly,) educational; Leach & Parker, 
principals, Leavenworth. 

The Tonganoxie Mirror, Republican; William Heynen, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Tonganoxie. 



212 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



lilNOOIiN COUNTY. 

The Lincoln Republican, Republican; Tell W. Walton, editor and publisher, 
Lincoln. 

The Lincoln Beacon, independent; advocates Woman Suffrage, Prohibition, and 
Anti-Monopoly; W. S. and Anna C. Wait, editors and publishers, Lincoln. 

Lincoln County Democrat, Democratic; Ira S. Troup, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Lincoln. 

Sylvan Grove Sentinel, neutral; W. H. Pilcher, editor and publisher, Sylvan 
Grove. 

Barnard Times, independent; S. M. Figge, publisher, Barnard. 

liINN COUNTY. 

Linn County Clarion, Republican; C. J. Trigg, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Mound City. 

Mound City Progress, independent; Howard T. Smith and John R. Mentzer, 
editors, publishers and proprietors, Mound City. 

Torch of Liberty, Union Labor; W. H. Clark and James Morrison, editors and 
publishers, Mound City. 

LaCygne Weekly Journal, Republican; J. P. Kenea and Ed. C. Lane, editors and 
publishers, LaCygne. 

The Pleasanton Observer, Republican; S. J. Heaton, editor, D. S. Capell, J. P. 
Kenea and Ed. C. Lane, proprietors, Pleasanton. 

The Pleasanton Herald, Union Labor; J. E. Latimer, editor and publisher, Pleas- 
anton. 

The Blue Mound Sun, Republican; John N. Barnes and W. S. Piatt, editors and 
publishers. Blue Mound. 

The Prescott Republican, Republican; Charles Henry Bigwood and James Stew- 
art Beckwith, editors and publishers, Prescott. 

liOGAN COUNTY. 

Monument Obelisk, Republican; J. W. Taylor, editor and publisher. Monument. 

Oakley Opinion, Democratic; Edward Kleist, editor and publisher, Oakley. 

Oakley News Letter, Republican; John A. Goodier, editor and publisher, Oakley. 

Winona Weekly Messenger, Democratic; A. S. Booton, editor and publisher, 
Winona. 

The Winona Clipper, Republican; J. P. Israel, editor, Winona. 

Logan County Republican, Republican; C. V. Kinney, editor; J. K. Hupp, pro- 
prietor, Russell Springs. 

Logan County Leader, Democratic; S. W. Grove, editor; S. W. Grove and Geo. 
Egger, publishers, Russell Springs. 

Augustine Herald, Republican; N. Fenstemaker, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Augustine. 

liYON COUNTY. 

The Emporia News, (daily and weekly,) independent; J. F. O'Connor, editor; H. 
D. Hammond, business manager; News Company, publishers, Emporia. 

Emporia Republican, (daily and weekly,) Republican; C. V. Eskridge, editor, pub- 
lisher and proprietor, Emporia. 

The Emporia Democrat, Democratic; J. M. McCown, editor and proprietor, Em- 
poria. 

The Kansas Workman, Union Labor; Cyrus Corning, editor; Kansas Workman 
Publishing Company, publishers, Emporia. 

The Fanatic, Prohibition; Joseph Langellier, editor and publisher, Emporia. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 213 

Emporia Sunday Gazette, Republican; W. F. Craig, editor and proprietor, Em- 
poria. 

The Hartford Call, Republican; W. J. Means, editor and publisher, Hartford, 

The Americus Ledger, Republican; C. A. and William Moore, editors, publishers, 
and proprietors, Americus. 

Allen Tidings, Republican; Major A. Paul, editor and proprietor, Allen. 

m'pheeson county. 

The McPherson Freeman, Republican; H. B. Kelly, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, McPherson. 

The McPherson Republican and Weekly Press, (daily and weekly,) Republican; 
S. G. Mead, editor, publisher and proprietor, McPherson. 

The Democrat, Democratic; Warren Knaus, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
McPherson. 

McPherson Anzeiger, (German;) J. F. Harms, editor, Western German Publish- 
ing Company, publishers, McPherson. 

Our Opinion, Union Labor; Geo. C. Findley, editor and business manager. Our 
•Opinion Publishing Company, publishers, McPherson. 

The School, Fireside and Farm, (monthly,) educational; S. Z. Sharp, editor-in- 
chief, George E. Studebaker, business manager, McPherson College, publishers, 
McPherson. 

The Lindsborg News, Republican; A. Ringwald, publisher, Lindsborg. 

The Canton Republican, Republican; W. R. Davis, editor and publisher. Canton. 

The Moundridge Leader, independent; James M. Coutts, editor, Moundridge 
Publishing Company, proprietors, Moundridge. 

The Marquette Monitor, Republican; S. W. Hill, editor and proprietor, Mar- 
quette. 

The Galva Times, neutral; James A. Harris, publisher, Galva. 

Framat, (Swedish,) educational; Jonas Westling, manager, Bethany Book Con- 
cern, publishers, Lindsborg. 

MAEION COUNTY. 

Marion Record, Republican; E. W. Hoch, editor, B. C. Hastings, manager, Marion. 

The Cottonwood Valley Times, Democratic; W. W. Wheeland, editor, "The Times " 
Publishing Company, J. H. Buchanan, president, M. O. Billings, business manager, 
publishers, Marion. 

Marion County Anzeiger, German; J. F. Harms, editor, Western German Pub- 
lishing Company, publishers, Hillsboro. 

The Lower Light, (monthly,) religious; 0. L. Clarke, secretary, Y. M. C. A., 
publishers, Marion. 

The Peabody Gazette, Republican; W. H. Morgan and Son (Geo. E.), editors, 
publishers and proprietors, Peabody. 

The Peabody Graphic, Republican; R. L. Cochran, editor, D. McKercher, pub- 
lisher, Peabody. 

The Florence Herald, Republican; W. H. Booth, editor and proprietor, Florence. 

Florence Weekly Bulletin, Democratic; J. B. Crouch, editor, Florence. 

Hillsboro Herald, (German,) Republican; John Dole, proprietor, Hillsboro. 

The Lost Springs Courier, Republican; J. C. Padgett, publisher, Lost Springs. 

MAESHALL COUNTY. 

Marshall County News, Republican; Geo. T. Smith, editor and proprietor, Marys- 
^ille. 

Marshall County Democrat, Democratic; O. J. Morse and W. T. Ecks, editors and 
managers, Marysville. 



214 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



Marysville Post, (German,) Democratic; William Becker, editor, publisher an<J 
proprietor, Marysville. 

The True Republican, Union Labor; P. D. Hartman, editor, Marysyille. 

The Waterville Telegraph, Republican; Henry C. Willson, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Waterville. 

Blue Rapids Times, Republican; E. M. Brice and Edward Skinner, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Blue Rapids. 

The Frankfort Bee, Republican; W. J. Granger, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Frankfort. 

The Frankfort Sentinel, Union Labor; S. H. Peters, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Frankfort. 

The Axtell Anchor, Republican; J. M. Ross and Thomas Nye, publishers, Aitell.. 

The Star, Republican; Dan M. Mabie, editor and publisher, Beattie. 

The Irving Leader, Republican; J. R. Leonard, editor and proprietor, Irving. 

MEADE COUNTY. 

The Meade County Globe, Republican; Frank Fuhr, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Meade Center. 

Meade County Press-Democrat, Democratic; H. Wilts. Brown, editor and pub- 
lisher, Meade Center. 

The Meade Republican, Republican; T. J. Palmer, editor and proprietor, Meade 
Center. 

Fowler City Graphic, Republican; I. A. Strauss, editor, O. S. Hurd, publisher and 
proprietor. Fowler City. 

The West Plains Mascott, Republican; H. B. Stone, editor and publisher. West 
Plains. 

The Hornet, Republican; Chas. K. Sourbeer, editor, Sourbeer Bros., publishers. 
Artesian City. 

MIAMI COUNTY. 

The Western Spirit, Democratic; B. J. Sheridan, editor, publisher and proprietor 
Paola. 

The Miami Republican, Republican; W. D. Greason, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Paola. 

The Paola Times, Republican; Aaron D. States, editor; Harry W. Land, pub- 
lisher; States & Land, proprietors, Paola. 

The Louisburg Herald, Republican; R. H. Cadwallader, editor, publisher and: 
proprietor, Louisburg. 

Osawatomie Graphic, independent; Frank Pyle and Merritt E. Springer, editors- 
and proprietors, Osawatomie. 

Osawatomie Advertiser, neutral; published by Osawatomie Printing Co., A. F. 
Meek, president; W. H. Campbell, secretary; G. N. Marley, publisher, Osawatomie. 

The Fontana News, neutral; M. Bramblet, editor and publisher, Fontana. 

MITGHEIiL COUNTY. 

The Beloit Gazette, Republican; S.H. Dodge, editor, publisher and proprietor, Be- 
loit. 

Beloit Weekly Courier, Republican; W.H.Caldwell, editor and proprietor, Beloit.. 
The Western Democrat, Democratic; H. A. Yonge, publisher and proprietor, Beloit^ 
Cawker City Journal, Republifean; by Ferd. Prince, Cawker City. 
Public Record, Republican; L. L. Alrich, editor and publisher, Cawker City. 
The Weekly Times, Republican; J. W. McBride, editor and proprietor, Cawker 
City. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 215 



Glen Elder Herald, Republican; N. F. Hewett, editor, Glen Elder. 
Scottsville Independent, Republican; Frank M. Coflfey, editor and publisher, 
Scottsville. 

MONTGOMEBT COUNTY. 

The star and Kansan, Democratic; H. W. Young, editor, publisher and propri- 
etor, Independence. 

South Kansas Tribune, Republican; W. T. and C. Yoe, editors, publishers and 
proprietors, Independence. 

The Evening Reporter, (daily,) neutral; T. N. Sickels, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor. Independence. 

The Refugees' Lone Star, (occasional,) charitable; D. Votaw, editor, Freedman's 
Relief Association, publishers, Independence. 

The Coffeyville Journal, Republican; D. Stewart Elliott, editor, W. G. Waver- 
ling, business manager and publisher, Coffeyville. 

The Sun, Republican; W. A. Peffer, jr., editor and publisher, Coffeyville. 

The Eagle, Democratic; H. M. Stewart, editor, Stewart <fc Hetherington, pub- 
lishers, Coffeyville. 

Daily Globe and Torch, and The Republican, (weekly,) Republican; C. P. Buf- 
fington, editor. Republican Publishing Company, ( C. C. Kincaid, C. P. Buffington, 
W. A. Cormack and 0. F. Carson,) publishers, Cherryvale. 

Cherry vale Champion, Republican; S. P. Moore, editor, F. G. Moore, publisher 
and proprietor, Cherryvale. 

The Elk City Eagle, Republican; W. F. Kingston, editor, publisher and propri- 
etor. Elk City. 

The Caney Chronicle, Republican; J. T. McKee, editor, J. T. McKee & Sons, pro- 
prietors, Caney. 

The Liberty Review, Union Labor; A. S. Duley, editor and publisher. Liberty. 

The Havana, Herald, independent; V. 0. Prather, editor and proprietor, E. G. 
Smith and V. O. Prather, publishers, Havana. 

MOBBIS COUNTY. 

The Council Grove Republican, Republican; Frank Moriarty and W. F. Waller, 
editors and proprietors. Council Grove. 

Council Grove Guard, Democratic; E. J. Dill, editor and publisher. Council Grove. 

The Anti-Monopolist, Union Labor; W. H. T. Wakefield, editor, publisher and 
proprietor. Council Grove. 

The Dunlap Reporter, independent; Daniel W. Murphy, editor, Dunlap. 

The White City News, independent; Banna F. Cress, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, White City. 

The Dwight Wasp, Republican; Joseph O. Clayton, editor and manager; Dwight 
Printing Company, publishers, Dwight. 

MOBTON COUNTY. 

The Leader-Democrat, Democratic; Q. A. Robertson, editor, Richfield. 

The Richfield Republican, Republican; R. G. Price, publisher, Richfield. 

The Taloga Star, Prohibition; H. W. Worthington, editor and publisher; Samuel 
Worthington, associate editor, Taloga. 

Westola Wave, neutral; W. C. Calhoun, editor and proprietor, Westola. 

Cundiff Journal, Democratic; Colver & Wester, editors and proprietors, Cundiff. 

Morton County Monitor, Republican; Glenn S. Van Gundy, editor; Frank Van 
Gundy, publisher, Morton. 

The Herald ; Gilbert, editor and proprietor, Morton. 



216 STATE Historical Society. 



NEMAHA COUNTY. 

Seneca Courier-Democrat, Democratic; A. P. and C. H. Herold, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors, Seneca. 

The Seneca Tribune, Republican; W. H. and G. F. Jordan, editors and publish- 
ers, Seneca. 

Nemaha County Republican, Republican; J. F, Clough, editor and proprietor, 
W. H. Whelan, associate editor, Sabetha. 

The Sabetha Herald, Republican; Flora P. Hogbin, editor, A. C. Hogbin, pub- 
lisher, Sabetha. 

Nemaha County Spectator, Republican; John Stowell, editor, Wetmore. 

Centralia Journal, Republican; Bert Patch, editor, B. H. Patch, publisher and 
proprietor, Centralia. 

The Goff's News, neutral; Thomas A. Kerr, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Goff's. 

NE08H0 COUNTY. 

Neosho County Journal, Democratic; John R. Brunt, publisher and proprietor, 
Osage Mission. 

Chanute Weekly Times, Republican; Cyrus T. Nixon, editor and publisher, 
Chanute. 

The Chanute Blade, Democratic; C. E. Allison and J. P. Bell, editors and pub- 
lishers, Chanute. 

Chanute Vidette, Republican; G. M. Dewey, publisher and proprietor, Chanute. 

Republican Record, Republican; Ben. J. Smith, editor and proprietor, Erie. 

The People's Vindicator, Union Labor; Wm. George and W. E. Hardy, editors 
and publishers, Erie. 

Head Light, Republican; C. T. Ewing, publisher, Thayer. 

Galesburg Enterprise, Republican; J. R. Schoonover, publisher, Galesburg. 

NESS COUNTY. 

Ness City Times, Republican; Steele L. Moorhead, editor and proprietor, Ness 
City. 

Ness County News, Republican; James K. Barnd, editor and proprietor, Ness City. 

Walnut Valley Sentinel, Democratic; D. E. McDowell and R. G. Weisell, editor, 
publisher and proprietor, Ness City. 

Harold Record, Republican; Robert Findlay, sr., editor and proprietor, Harold. 

Nonchalanta Herald, neutral; H. C. Notson, editor and publisher, Nonchalanta. 

NOBTON COUNTY. 

The Norton Courier, Republican; F. M. Duvall, manager, Norton. 

The Champion, Republican; J. W. Conway, editor and proprietor, Norton. 

Weekly New Era and Norton Democrat, Democratic; W. H. Hiles, editor, Norton. 

Lenora Record, Democratic; Charles T. Bogert, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Lenora. 

The Edmond Times, Republican; Mark J. Kelley, editor. Times Printing Com- 
pany, publishers, Edmond. 

The Almena Star, Republican; Marion J. Munday, publisher, Almena. 

The Almena Plaindealer, Republican; A. J. McKinney, editor and publisher, 
Almena. 

OSAOE COUNTY. 

The Osage County Chronicle, Republican; J. N. McDonald, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Burlingame. 

The Burlingame Democrat, Democratic; W. D. Jacobs and J. L. Cooper, editors 
and proprietors, E. J. Dill, W. D. Jacobs and J. L. Cooper, publishers, Burlingame. 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 217 



The Burlingame News, (amateur monthly;) Dick Taylor, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Burlingame. 

The Beech Brook Breeze, (amateur monthly;) Nettie B. Woodzelle, editress, W. 
H, Mundy, publisher, Burlingame. 

The Burlingame Echo, (amateur monthly;) W. H. Mundy, editor, proprietor and 
publisher. Miss Lulu Harris, associate editor, Burlingame. 

The Oage City Free Press, Republican; J. V. Admire, editor, D. J. Roberts, super- 
intendent. Free Press Company, publishers, Osage City. 

Kansas People, independent; Miles W. Blain and Elijah Mills, editors and pub- 
lishers, Osage City. 

The Lyndon Journal, Republican; W. A. Madaris, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Lyndon. 

Osage County Graphic, Republican; R. A. Miller, editor. Graphic Publishing 
Company, publishers, Lyndon. 

The Carbondalian, Republican; Reuben F. Playford, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Carbondale. 

The Osage County Republican, Republican; W. F. Cochran and M. B. Evans, 
editors and publishers, Quenemo. 

The Melvern Record, Republican; W. S. Rilea, editor and publisher, Melvern. 

Osage County Times, Union Labor; James Cox, editor and proprietor, Scranton. 

08B0BNE COUNTY. 

Osborne County Farmer, Republican; C. W. Crampton and C. W. Landis, editors, 
publishers and proprietors, C. W. Crampton, business manager, Osborne. 

Osborne County News, Democratic; W. D. Gerard & Co., editors and publishers, 
Osborne. 

Osborne County Journal, Republican; F. H. Barnhart and John G. Eckman, pro- 
prietors, Osborne. 

Downs Times, Republican; E. D. and Q. R. Craft, publishers, Downs. 

The Downs Chief, Democratic; W. H. Whitmore, editor and proprietor. Downs. 

Western Empire, Republican; Israel Moore and D. E. Goddard, publishers, Alton. 

Portis Patriot, Republican; M. H. Hoyt, publisher and proprietor, Portis. 

The Downs Globe, Republican; Benj. T. Baker, editor, Benj. T. Baker and James 
Bower, proprietors, Downs. 

OTTAWA COUNTY. 

The Minneapolis Messenger, Republican; A. P. Riddle and C. M. Dunn, editors 
and publishers, A. P. Riddle, proprietor, Minneapolis. 

Solomon Valley Democrat, Democratic; Park S. Warren, managing editor, Min- 
neapolis. 

Minneapolis Commercial, Republican; H. R. Campbell, editor, H. R. and E. K. 
Campbell, publishers, Minneapolis. 

Kansas Workman, (monthly,) A. O. U. W.; A. P. Riddle, editor and proprietor, 
Minneapolis. 

The Sprig of Myrtle, (monthly,) Knights of Pythias; A. P. Riddle, editor and pro- 
prietor, Minneapolis. 

The School Room Journal, (monthly.) educational; A. P. Warrington, editor, Min- 
neapolis. 

Delphos Republican, Republican ; J. M. Waterman, editor and proprietor, Delphos. 

Bennington Star, Union Labor; D. B. Loudon, editor and proprietor, D. K. Kirk- 
land, local editor, Bennington. 

The Tescott Herald, Republican; Guy A. Adams, editor and proprietor, Tescott. 



218 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



PAWNEE COUNTY. 

Lamed Weekly Chronoscope, Republican; The Larned Printing Company, pub- 
lisher, Fred S. Hatch, managing editor, Larned. 

The Larned Eagle-Optic, Democratic; Optic Steam Printing Company, pub- 
lishers, Thomas E. Leftwich, managing editor, A. B. Leftwich, business manager, 
Larned. 

The Labor News, Union Labor; W. M. Goodner, editor and business manager, 
Larned. 

Larned Democrat, Democratic; B. B. Crawford, editor and proprietor, Larned. 

The Burdett Bugle, Democratic; J. C. Browne, publisher, Burdett. 

PHIIililPS COUNTY. 

The Kirwin Chief, Republican; R. J. Palmer, and C. E. Anderson, publishers, R. 
J. Palmer, manager, Kirwin. 

Phillipsburg Herald, Republican; E. F. Korns and R. A. Dague, publishers and 
proprietors, Phillipsburg. 

Phillipsburg Democrat, Democratic; W. D. Covington, proprietor, Phillipsburg. 

The Phillipsburg Dispatch, Republican; J. M. McNay, editor, J. M. McNay & Co., 
publishers, Phillipsburg. 

Phillips County Freeman, anti-monopoly; H. N. Boyd, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Logan. 

The Logan Republican, Republican; Lew and Chas. Cunningham, publishers, 
Logan. 

Long Island Leader, Republican; J. N. Curl, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Long Island. 

Phillips County Inter Ocean, Republican; E. M. Weed, editor, and proprietor, 
Long Island. 

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY. 

The Louisville Indicator, Republican; E. D. Anderson, editor and publisher, 
Louisville. 

Kansas Agriculturist, Republican; Ernest A. Weller, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Wamego. 

Daily Wamegan, Republican; Ernest A. Weller, editor and proprietor, Wamego. 

The Kansas Reporter, Republican; W. P. Campbell, editor and publisher, Wamego. 

St. Marys Star, Democratic; James Graham, editor; C. W. and L. J. Graham, 
associate editors and publishers, St. Marys. 

St. Marys Gazette, Republican; J. S. Carpenter, editor; J. S. Carpenter and A. C. 
Sherman, publishers, St. Marys. 

The Westmoreland Recorder, Republican; J. W. Shiner, editor and publisher, 
Westmoreland. 

The Onaga Democrat, Democratic; A. W. Chabin, editor and publisher, Onaga. 

The Olsburg Newsletter, Republican; Lewis Havermale, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Olsburg. 

-PBATT COUNTY. 

The Pratt County Republican, Republican; F. A. Lanstrum and C. T. Warren, 
editors and proprietors, Pratt. 

Pratt County Times, Republican; James Kelly, editor; James Kelly and J. W. 
Naron, publishers, Pratt Center. 

Pratt County Register, Democratic; Dilday & Van Senden, editors, publishers 
aivl proprietors, Pratt Center. 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 219 



Cullison Tomahawk, Democratic; J. S. M'Anarney, editor; Cullison Publishing 
Company, publishers; C. Y. Martin, manager, Cullison. 

Preston Enterprise, independent; Charles T. Allen, editor and publisher, Preston. 

BAWLINS COUNTY. 

The Republican Citizen, Republican; James D. Greason, editor and publisher, 
Atwood. 

The Atwood Journal, Democratic; R. S. Hendricks, editor and proprietor, At- 
wood. 

The Rawlins County Democrat, Democratic; L. A. Hannigan, editor, Blakeman. 

The Blakeman Register, Republican; F. F. Coolidge, editor and proprietor, 
Blakeman. 

The Ludell Gazette, Republican; R. H. Chase, editor, Ludell. 

The McDonald Times, Republican; Fred H. Eno, editor, J. R. Sedgwick, pub- 
lisher, McDonald. 

The Herndon Courant, Republican; E. H. Rathbone, publisher, Herndon. 

EENO COUNTY. 

Hutchinson News, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Ralph M. Easley, president 
and managing editor, Hutchinson News Company, publishers, Hutchinson. 

Weekly Interior Herald, Republican; Fletcher Meridith, editor and proprietor, 
Hutchinson. 

The Weekly Democrat, Democratic; M. J. Keys, editor and publisher, Hutchin- 
son. 

The Saturday Review, Democratic; Y. A. Hartman, editor. South Hutchinson. 

The Nickerson Argosy, Republican; W. F. Hendry and J. E. Humphrey, editors 
and publishers, Nickerson. 

The Nickerson Register, Republican; Harry W. Brown and Harry Brightman, 
editors and publishers, Nickerson. 

The Arlington Enterprise, Republican, John L. Sponsler, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Arlington. 

Sylvia Telephone, Republican; F. D. Roberts <fe Co., proprietors, Sylvia. 

The Haven Dispatch, Republican; George S. Astle and G. W. Duke, editors and 
proprietors. Haven. 

The Turon Rustler, Republican; M. A. Smedley and R. S. Smedley, editors and 
publishers, Turon. 

The Journal, Republican; R. H. Chittenden, editor, H. T. Chittenden, jr., pub- 
lisher. South Hutchinson. 

The Weekly Press, Republican; F. G. Guyer, editor and proprietor, Olcott. 

The Torch Light, Prohibition; L. D. Abbott, editor and pr6prietor, Plevna. 

EEPUBIilO COUNTY. 

The Belleville Telescope, Republican; E. E. Brainerd, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Belleville. 

The Belleville Democrat, Democratic; C. M. McLaury, editor, J. and C. M. 
McLaury, publishers and proprietors, Belleville. 

Scandia Journal, Republicari; I. C. Ware, editor. Ware & Co., publishers, Scandia. 

The Scandia Independent, independent; H. J. Newton, publisher and propri- 
etor, Scandia. 

Republic City News, Republican; Gomer T. Davies, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Republic City. 



220 STATE RISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



The Cuba Union, Republican; T. A. Cordry, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Cuba. 

The Cuba Daylight, Republican; Joseph Shimek, editor, publisher and propria 
etor, Cuba. 

BIOE COUNTY. 

Sterling Gazette, Republican; E. B. Cowgill, editor and publisher, A. L. McMillan, 
associate editor, Sterling. 

The Sterling Bulletin, Republican; J. E. Junken and S. H. Steele, publishers, W. 
J. Benn, city editor, Sterling. 

Sterling Weekly Champion, Republican; Thos. L. Powers, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Sterling. 

The Lyons Republican, Republican; Clark Conkling, publisher, Lyons. 

The Lyons Prohibitionist, Prohibition; D. P. Hodgdon, editor and proprietor,. 
Lyons. 

The Lyons Tribune, Democratic; Soldiers' Tribune Publishing Company, pub- 
lishers, Lyons. 

The Chase Record, independent; D. W. Stone, editor and proprietor. Chase. 

The Little River Monitor, Republican; W. G. Greenbank, editor and business, 
manager, E. B. PuUiam, publisher, Little River. 

Geneseo Herald, Republican; W. R. White and M. W. Smith, editors, Geneseo. 

Cain City Razzooper, Democratic; Will J. McHugh, editor and publisher, B. Grant 
Jeflferis, associate editor, Cain City. 

Frederick Independent, Republican; Ira H. Clark, editor and proprietor, Fred- 
erick. 

BILEY COUNTY. 

The Nationalist, Republican; Rev. R. D. Parker, Geo. F. Thompson, and L. B. 
Parker, editors, publishers and proprietors, Manhattan. 

The Industrialist, educational and agricultural;^ edited by the Faculty of the 
State Agricultural College, Geo. T. Fairchild, president, Manhattan. 

The Manhattan Republic, (daily and weekly,) Republican; G. A. Atwood, editor 
and publisher, Manhattan. 

The Mercury, Democratic; J. J. Davis, editor and proprietor, Manhattan. 

The Kansas Telephone, (monthly,) religious; Rev. R. D. Parker, editor and pub- 
lisher, Manhattan. 

Journal of Mycology, (monthly,) scientific; Prof. W. A. Kellerman, editor and 
publisher, Manhattan. 

The Argus, (quarterly,) religious; Manhattan Y. M. C. A., publishers, Manhattan. 

The Saturday Signal, Union Labor; Jas. W. and Emmett McDonald, publishers, 
Manhattan. 

Randolph Enterprise, Republican; J. H. Colt, editor and proprietor, Randolph. 

Leonardville Monitor, Republican; P. S. Loofbourrow, editor, Leonardville. 

The Riley Times, Union Labor; Dudley Atkins, editor and publisher, Riley. 

BOOKS COUNTY. 

The Western News, Republican; E. and O. Owen, editors and proprietors, 
Stockton. 

Rooks County Record, Republican; W. L. Chambers, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Stockton. 

Rooks County Democrat, Democratic; H. T. Miller, editor and publisher, Stockton. 

Stockton Eagle, Republican; R. D. Graham and Mart. H. Hoyt, editors, Stockton. 

Stockton Academician, educational, (monthly;) edited by the Faculty, I. F. Mather,, 
principal, Stockton. 



Sixth biennial Mepobt. 221 



The Plainville Times, Republican; W. E. Powers, editor and proprietor, Plain- 
ville. 

Labor Tablet, Union Labor; James and William Butler, editors and publishers, 
Plainville. 

Woodston Register, independent; D. E, Cole, editor, M. L. Mclntyre <fe Co., pub- 
lishers, Woodston. 

Cresson Dispatch, neutral; Frank M. Boyd, proprietor, Cresson. 

KUSH COUNTY. 

Rush Centre Gazette, Republican; R. A. Russell, editor and publisher, R. A. and 
H. A. Russell, proprietors, Rush Centre. 

Rush County News, Republican; Tom J. Stumbaugh, editor and manager. News 
Publishing Company, publishers, Rush Centre. 

La Crosse Chieftain, Republican; John E. Frazer, editor, John E. Frazer and 
F. H. Davis, proprietors, La Crosse. 

The La Crosse Democrat, Democratic; J. M. Tracy, editor and publisher. La 
Crosse. 

McCracken Enterprise, Republican; W. B. Newton, editor and publisher, Mc- 
Cracken. 

BUSSELL COUNTY. 

The Russell Record, Republican; James Jones, editor and publisher, Wi S. Keller, 
foreman, Russell. 

Russell Journal, Democratic; E. J. Collins, editor, Collins and Merrill, proprietors, 
Russell. 

Bunker Hill Gazette, Republican; J. C. Gault and A. J. Ulsh, editors, J. C. Gault, 
publisher. Bunker Hill. 

The Dorrance Nugget, Republican; Samuel H. Haffa, editor and proprietor, Dor- 
rance. 

Luray Headlight, independent; J. M. McAfee, editor and publisher, Luray. 

The Lucas Advance, Republican; C. E. Hughey, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Lucas. 

Waldo Enterprise, independent; F. M. Case, editor and publisher, Waldo. 

SALINE COUNTY. 

Saline County Journal, Republican; M. D. Sampson, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Salina. 

Salina Herald, Democratic; J. M. Davis, publisher, Salina. 

The Salina Republican, (daily and weekly.) Republican; J. Leeford Brady, editor, 
publisher and proprietor, Salina. 

The Rising Sun, Prohibition; D. M. Gillespie, editor and publisher, Salina. 

Normal Register, (quarterly,) educational; L. O. Thoroman, managing editor, 
Salina. 

The Western Odd Fellow, (semi-monthly,) secret society; D. J. Richey, publisher, 
Salina. 

Vade Mecum, (monthly,) in the interests of agents and advertisers; F. F. Oakley, 
publishers, Salina. 

Brookville Transcript, Republican; Frank Honeywell, editor and publisher, 
Brookville. 

The Gypsum Valley Echo, Republican; J. Wayne Amos, editor and publisher. 
Gypsum City. 

The Assaria Argus, Republican; Dursley Sargent, publisher and proprietor, As- 



222 STATE HiSTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



80OTT COUNTY. 

Scott County News, Republican; Harvey Fleming and N. D. Adams, editors and 
publishers, Scott City. 

The Sentinel-Herald, Democratic; D. F. Hall, editor, J. M. Beadles, managing 
editor, Scott City. 

The Pence Phonograph, Democratic; R. W. Black, editor and proprietor, Pence. 

8EDOWICK COUNTY. 

Wichita Eagle, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Marshall M. Murdock, editor, 
M. M. and R. P. Murdock, publishers and proprietors, Wichita. 

The News-Beacon, (daily,) and The Wichita Beacon, (weekly,) Democratic; John 
S. Richardson, editor, Frederick N. Peck, publisher, Wichita. 

Wichita New Republic, Republican; J. S. Jennings, editor and proprietor, Wich- 
ita. 

The Arrow, neutral; Lon Hoding, publisher, Wichita. 

Wichita Herold, (German,) Democratic; John Hoenscheidt, editor, Wichita. 

Kansas Staats-Anzeiger, (German,) Democratic; John Hoenscheidt, editor, Wich- 
ita. 

The Wichita Independent, neutral; H. W. Sawyer, editor and manager, Wichita. 

The Mirror, society; R. E. Ryan and E. L. Mackenzie, editors and publishers, 
Wichita. 

The Wichita Journal, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; John Hoenscheidt, man- 
aging editor, Leo. L. Redding and Samuel A. Harburg, associate editors. Journal 
Publishing Company, publishers, Wichita. 

Monthly Echoes, Y. M. C. A.; A. Baird, general secretary, Wichita. 

University Review, (quarterly,) educational; Rev. Warren B. Hendryx, president 
and business manager, Wichita. 

The Wichita Weekly Express, Union Labor; Robert E. Neff, editor, G. T. Demaree, 
managing editor. Enterprise Publishing Company, publishers, Wichita. 

Wichita Commercial Bulletin, neutral; J. Hulaniski, editor, C. L. Hammack, busi- 
ness manager, Hulaniski <fe Hammack, publishers, Wichita. 

The Wichita Commercial, neutral; Ralph Field, editor and publisher, Whit 0. 
Mitchell, associate editor, Wichita. 

Wichita Diocesan News, religious; Rev. John Begley, editor, Wichita. 

The Valley Center News, Republican; Dwight Beach, editor, Dewing &, Beach, pro- 
prietors. Valley Center. 

The Weekly Mount Hope Mentor, Republican; E. V. Welch, publisher and pro- 
prietor. Mount Hope. 

The Colwich Courier, independent; Willis B. Powell, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Colwich. 

The Clearwater Sun, Republican; F. B. Brown, editor and publisher, Clearwater. 

The Cheney Blade, Republican; Warren Foster, editor and proprietor, Cheney. 

BEWABD COUNTY. 

The Liberal Leader, Democratic; Lambert Willstaedt, editor and publisher, Lib- 
eral. 

Southwest Chronicle, Republican; GrifiF B. Newcom, editor and manager. Chroni- 
cle Printing Co., publishers, Liberal. 

The Arkalon News, Republican; A. K. Stoufer, editor and proprietor, Arkalon. 

Springfield Transcript, Democratic; L. P. Kemper, editor and proprietor, 
Springfield. 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 223 



SHAWNEE COUNTY. 

The Capital-Commonwealth, (daily and weekly,) Republican; J. K. Hudson, edi- 
tor, publisher and proprietor, Topeka. 

State Journal, (daily and weekly,) Republican; Frank P. MacLennan, editor and 
publisher, Topeka. 

The Kansas Democrat, (daily,) Democratic; The Kansas Democrat Publishing Co., 

C. K. Hdlliday, jr., president, W. P. Tomlinson, vice-president, Harry Garvey, secre- 
tary, treasurer, manager and publisher, J. L. Thornton, business manager, Topeka. 

Kansas Farmer, agricultural; Kansas Farmer Company, publishers, Samuel J. 
Crawford, president, J. B. McAfee, vice-president, H. A. Heath, business manager, 
W. A. Peffer, managing editor, Topeka. 

Kansas Telegraph, (German,) Democratic; H. Von Langen, editor and publisher, 
Topeka. 

The Kansas Churchman, (monthly.) religious; Rt. Rev. Bishop Vail, editor, 
Topeka. 

The Western Baptist, religious; L. H. Holt and C. S. Sheffield, editors, publishers 
and proprietors, Topeka. 

Saturday Evening Lance, literary; Harry W. Frost, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

The Kansas Newspaper Union ; F. P. Baker, editor, N. R. Baker, manager, Topeka. 

Western School Journal, (monthly,) educational; John MacDonald, editor, pub- 
lisher and proprietor, Topeka. 

The Weekly Knight and Soldier, G. A. R.; M. 0. Frost, editor and publisher, To- 
peka. 

The American Citizen, (colored,) Republican; J. Hume Childers, editor, A. Mor- 
ton, manager, J. L. Sims, assistant manager, Morton & Co., publishers, Topeka. 

The Christian Citizen, general newspaper; Richard Wake, editor, Riley & W^ake 
Printing Company, publishers, A. T. Riley, business manager, Topeka. 

The Sunday Ledger, literary; J. P. Limeburner, editor, George W. Reed, business 
manager. The Ledger Company, publishers, Topeka. 

The Light, (monthly,) Masonic; Charles Spalding, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Our Messenger, (monthly,) W\ C. T. U.; Olive P. Bray, editor, Topeka. 

The Welcome, (monthly,) musical; E. B. Guild, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

The Washburn Argo, (monthly,) literary; A. W. Brewster, editor-in-chief, Samuel 
W. Naylor, business manager, Topeka. 

The Washburn Reporter, collegiate; Robert Stone, editor-in-chief, C. P. Donnell, 

D. H. Piatt, H. M. Olson andJ. L. Poston, associate-editors, L. S. Dolman, business 
manager, Topeka. 

The Night Hawk; Washburn College, occasional, Topeka. 

Kansas United Presbyterian, (monthly,) religious; Rev. M. F. McKirahan, pub- 
lisher, R. M. McGaw, local editor, W. J. Neely and J. E. Kirkpatrick, business man- 
agers, Topeka. 

The Leader, Prohibition; Lee H. Dowling, editor, Topeka. 

Topeka Argus, Republican-Prohibition, equal suffrage, human rights and West- 
ern immigration; Mrs. M. E. DeGeer, editor-in-chief. Miss Laura Keeve, publisher, 
Topeka. 

The Kansas Financier, (semi-monthly;) S. L. Seabrook, editor and proprietor, 
Topeka. 

The Printer Girl, (monthly,) literary; Mary Abarr, editor and manager, Printer 
Girl Publishing Co., publishers, Topeka. 

What Now, (monthly;) published by Railroad Department of the Y. M. C. A., 
R. L. Roberts, editor, Topeka. 
—16 



224 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



The Association Reflector, (monthly,) Y. M. C. A.; T. P. Day, editor, G. W. Gar- 
land, business manager, Topeka. 

The Season Signal, (monthly,) advertising; J. M. Shepherd, publisher, Topeka. 

The Budget, (monthly,) advertising; J. F. Daniels, publisher, Topeka. 

The Kansas News, (monthly,) advertising; C. E. Prather, editor, Kansas News 
Co., publishers, Topeka. 

National Passenger, (monthly,) railroad; James L. King, editor, Geo. M. Ewing, 
business manager, Topeka. 

The Topeka Mail, Republican; Frank A., Albert C. and George A. Root, editors 
and publishers. North Topeka. 

The North Topeka News, (daily and weekly,) neutral; G. F. Kimball, editor, Kan- 
sas News Co., publishers. North Topeka. 

The Spirit of Kansas, Prohibition and anti-monopoly; G. F. Kimball, editor and 
publisher, North Topeka. 

The Rossville Times, neutral; G. A. Weller, editor and publisher, Rossville. 

SHEBIDAN COUNTY. 

The Hoxie Sentinel, Republican; W. L. Humes, editor and proprietor, Hoxie. 
TheHoxie Democrat, Democratic; S. P. Davidson, editor and proprietor, Hoxie. 
The Selden Times, Republican; J. F. Thompson, publisher, Selden. 

SHEBMAN COUNTY. 

Sherman County Democrat, Democratic; Frank Parks, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Goodland. 

Sherman County Dark Horse, Republican; J. H. Tait, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Goodland. 

The Goodland News, Democratic: E. F. Tennant, editor and publisher, Goodland. 

Sherman County Republican, Republican; J. H. Stewart, publisher, J. J. Crofut, 
soliciting editor, Goodland. 

State Line Register, neutral; Chas. A. Fitch, editor, J. Frank Longanecker, pro- 
prietor, Kanorado. 

SMITH COUNTY. 

Kansas Pioneer, (daily and weekly;) J. N. Beacom, managing editor and pub- 
lisher, J. J. Hafer, local editor, Smith Centre. 

The Smith County Bulletin, Republican; John Q. Royce, editor and proprietor, 
Smith Centre. 

The Bazoo, Democratic; Jack W. Stewart, editor and proprietor. Smith Centre. 

Gaylord Herald, Republican; Lew C. Headley, editor and proprietor, Gaylord. 

Cedarville Globe, Republican; A. Barron, editor and proprietor, Cedarville. 

The Lebanon Criterion, Republican; J. A. Wright, editor and publisher, Lebanon. 

Union Labor Trumpet and The People's Friend, Union Labor; M. L. and Katie 
Lockwood, publishers, Kensington. 

The Kensington Mirror, Republican; 0. L. Reed, editor, Kensington. 

The Athol News, Union Labor; M. L. and Katie Lockwood, publishers, Athol. 

STAFFORD COUNTY. 

Stafiford County Herald, Republican and Democratic; R. M. Blair and L. M. 
Steele, editors. Herald Publishing Company, proprietors, M. Benefiel, publisher. 

Stafiford County Republican, Republican-Prohibition; Dr. Geo. W. Akers, editor. 
Art. B. Akers, business manager, Akers & Son, proprietors, Stafford. 

The St. John Weekly News, Republican; W. K. P. Dow, editor and business man- 
ager, The News Publishing Company, publishers, St. John. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 225 



County Capital, Democratic; John B. Hilmes, editor and publisher, St. John. 

The Macksville Times, Republican; A. H. Dever, editor, Welch & Woodford, 
managers, John S. Welch, business manager, Macksville. 

The Cassoday Mirage, Democratic; Hosea Hammitt, editor and publisher, Cas- 
soday. 

STANTON COUNTY. 

Johnson City Journal, Republican; John A. Webster and N. R. Spencer, editors, 
Johnson City. 

The Border Rover, Democratic; Lou Cravens, editor and publisher, T. B. Pyles, 
proprietor. Borders. 

Stanton Telegram, Republican; E. W. Cross, editor and proprietor, Goguac. 

STEVENS COUNTY. 

The Hugo Weekly Herald, Democratic; Geo. W. McClintick, editor and proprietor, 
Hugoton. 

Woodsdale Democrat, Democratic; S. N. Wood & M. L. Wood, editors. Woods- 
dale Publishing Company, publishers, D. W. Walker, manager, Woodsdale. 

The Hermes, Republican; Chas. M. Davis, editor and publisher, Hugoton. 

Moscow Review, Democratic; Lee A. Walton, editor, James Moody, publisher, T. 
B. Pyles, proprietor, Moscow. 

The Voorhees Vindicator, Democratic; C. R.Wright, editor, T. B. Pyles, proprie- 
tor, Voorhees. 

SUMNEB COUNTY. 

The Sumner County Press, Republican; Jacob Stotler, editor and manager, Will 
R. Stotler, assistant editor, Press Printing Company, publishers, Wellington. 

Sumner County Standard, (daily and weekly,) Democratic; Luke Herring, editor 
and publisher, Wellington. 

The Wellington Monitor, Republican; J. G. Campbell and Chas. Hood, editors 
and publishers, Wellington. 

The Christian Reminder, (monthly,) religious; Rev. J. G. M. Hursh, editor and 
publisher, Wellington. 

Stars and Stripes for Young America, (bi-monthly,) amateur; Fred F. Heath, 
Milwaukee, Wis., and John T. Nixon, editors, Wellington. 

The Mocking Bird, Republican; A. A. Richards, publisher, Oxford. 

The Caldwell Journal, Democratic; David Leahy, editor, R. B. Swarthout, pub- 
lisher, Caldwell. 

The Caldwell News, Republican; Robert T. Simons, editor and publisher, Cald- 
well. 

The Industrial Age, Union Labor; S. C. Whitwam, editor, Wellington. 

Belle Plaine News, independent; Emera E. Wilson, editor, Wilson, Turley & Co., 
proprietors. Belle Plaine. 

Mulvane Record, independent; G. L. Reed, editor, publisher and proprietor, Mul- 
vane. 

Geuda Springs Herald, Republican; M. W. Reynolds, editor and proprietor, Geuda 
Springs. 

The Argonia Clipper, independent; S. W. Duncan, editor and proprietor, Argonia. 

Conway Springs Star, Republican; Geo. W. Cain and P. W. Bast, publishers, Con- 
way Springs. 

The South Haven New Era, neutral; Boone Denton, editor and proprietor, South 
Haven. 

THOMAS COUNTY. 

Thomas County Cat, Republican; Joseph A. Gill, editor, Thomas County Publish- 
ing Company, proprietors Colby. 



226 State Historical Society, 

The Democrat, Democratic; Howard Carpenter, editor and proprietor, Colby. 
The Colby Tribune, Republican; I. A. Kelley, editor and proprietor, Colby. 
The Brewster Gazette, Republican; Q. F. Roberts, editor, Brewster. 

TBBGO COUNTY. 

Western Kansas World, Republican; W. 8. Tiiton, editor, publisher and proprie- 
tor, Wa-Keeney. 

Wa-Keeney Tribune, Democratic; C. L. Cain, publisher and proprietor, Wa- 
Eeeney. 

Trego County Republican, Republican; Geo. J. Shepard, editor and publisher, 
Wa-Keeney. 

WABAUNSEE COUNTY. 

The Wabaunsee County News, Republican; I. D. Gardiner, editor, publisher and 
proprietor, Alma. 

The Alma Enterprise, Republican; V. C. Welch and Frank I. Sage, editors, pub- 
lishers and proprietors. Alma. 

The Eskridge Star, Republican; E. H. Perry, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Eskridge. 

The Alia Vista Register, Republican; S. A. Stauffer, editor. Register Co., pub- 
lishers, Alta Vista. 

The Paxico Courier, Republican; L. E. Hoffman, editor, Paxico. * 

WAIiliAOE COUNTY. 

Wallace County Register, Republican, S. L. Wilson, editor, S. L. Wilson <fe Co., 
publishers, Wallace. 

Wallace Weekly Herald, Democratic; A. S. Booton, editor, A. S. Booton and J. L. 
Bornt, publishers, Wallace. 

The Western Times, Republican; Mrs. Kate B. Russell, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Sharon Springs. 

Sharon Springs Leader, Republican; C. N. Banks, editor,publisher and proprie- 
tor, Tune Bentley, local editor and manager, Sharon Springs. 

The Weskansan, independent; Mark Scott, editor, Weskan Publishing Company, 
publishers, Weskan. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Washington Republican, Republican; H. C. Robinson and L. J. Sprengle, editors, 
publishers and proprietors, Washington. 

The Washington Register, Republican; J. B. Besack &, Son (W. H.), editors, 
Washington. 

The Washington Post, Democratic; Samuel Clarke, editor, Washington. 

The Hanover Democrat, Democratic; J. M. Hood, editor, J. M. Hood and ■ 
Munger, publishers, Hanover. 

The Clifton Review, Republican; J. A. Branson, editor and proprietor, Clifton. 

The Local News, Republican; L. A. Palmer, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Clifton. 

Greenleaf Journal, Republican; J. W. Bliss, editor, Frank D. Bliss, publisher and 
proprietor, Greenleaf. 

The Greenleaf Herald, independent; Frederick Amelung, editor and proprietor, 
Greenleaf. 

Haddam Weekly Clipper, Republican; J. B. Campbell, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Haddam. 

The Haddam Investigator, neutral; Ray E. Chase, editor, T. C. Baldwin, manager, 
Haddam. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 227 

The Barnes Enterprise, Republican; M. H. Williams and M. O. Reitzel editors, 
Enterprise Publishing Company, publishers, Barnes. 

Palmer Pioneer, Republican; F. T. Cook, editor, Palmer. 

Hollenberg Record, Republican; Charles E. Williamson, editor, Hollenberg. 

WICHITA COUNTY. 

Wichita Standard, Republican; C. S. Triplett, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Leoti. 

The Leoti Transcript, Democratic; W. R. Gibbs, editor and proprietor, Leoti. 
The Western Farmer, neutral; D. T. Armstrong, editor and proprietor, Leoti. 

WILSON COUNTY. 

Wilson County Citizen, Republican; John S. Gilmore, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Fredonia. 

Fredonia Democrat, Democratic; H. L. Crittenden, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor, Fredonia. 

Neodesha Register, Republican; J. K. Morgan, editor, publisher and proprietor, 
Neodesha. 

Neodesha Independent, independent; Harry A. Armstrong, editor and publisher, 
Neodesha. 

Buffalo Express, Union Labor; W. H. Jones, editor and publisher, Buffalo. 

Altoona Journal, independent; M. A. Rhea, editor and publisher, Altoona. 

WOODSON COUNTY. 

The Post, Republican; J.N. Stout, editor, publisher and proprietor, Neosho Falls. 

The News, Republican; I. M. Jewitt and R. H. Trueblood, publishers and pro- 
prietors, Yates Center. 

Woodson Democrat, Democratic; R. R. Wells, editor and proprietor, Yates 
Center. 

The Toronto Republican, Republican; N. B. Buck and C. A. Buck, publishers and 
proprietors, Toronto. 

WYANDOTTE COUNTY. 

The Wyandotte Herald, Democratic; V. J. Lane & Co., editors, publishers and 
proprietors, Kansas City. 

The Kansas City Gazette, (daily and weekly,) Republican; the Gazette Company, 
publishers, Geo. W. Martin, president and editor, J. J. Maxwell, city editor and treas- 
urer, J. W. Wert, secretary, Kansas City. 

Kansas Pioneer, Republican; Louis Weil, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 

The Agassiz Companion, (monthly,) scientific; Will H. Plank, editor and pub- 
lisher, Kansas City. 

Rosedale Record, Democratic; F. M. B. Norman, editor and proprietor, Rosedale 
Publishing Company, publishers, Rosedale. 

The Armourdale Advocate, (daily and weekly,) Republican; John E. Rastall, editor 
and proprietor, F. O. Rodell, local editor, Armourdale post office, Kansas City. 

Cromwell's Kansas Mirror, Republican; Mark Cromwell, editor and proprietor 
Armourdale post office, Kansas City. 

Argentine Republic, neutral; Joseph T.Landrey, editor and proprietor, Argentine. 

NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS OF OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES 

NOW RECEIVED. 

ABIZONA. 

Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner, Republican; Arizona Publishing Company, pub- 
lishers, J. C. Martin, editor and manager, Prescott. 



228 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



OAIjIFOBNIA. 

The Weekly Post; Post Company, publishers, San Francisco. 

Pacific Rural Press; Dewey & Co., publishers, A. T. Dewey and W. B. Ewer, edi- 
tors, San Francisco. 

The Overland Monthly; Overland Monthly Company, publishers, San Francisco. 

California Patron and Agriculturist; A. T. Dewey, manager, San Francisco. 

The Signs of The Times; International Missionary Society, publishers, E. J. 
Waggoner and Alonzo T. Jones, editors, Oakland. 

Pacific Health Journal and Temperance Advocate, (monthly;) Pacific Press 
Company, publishers, J. N. Loughborough, J. E. Caldwell, M. D., and C. P. Bollman, 
editors, Oakland. 

The American Sentinel, (monthly;) Pacific Press Publishing Company, publish- 
ers, E. J. Waggoner and Alonzo T. Jones, editors, Oakland. 

OOIiOBADO. 

Weekly Rocky Mountain News; News Company, publishers, John Arkins, presi- 
dent and manager, Denver. 

The Denver Republican, (daily;) Republican Publishing Company, publishers, 
Denver. 

Queen Bee, woman suffrage; Mrs. C. M. Churchill, publisher and proprietor, 
Denver. 

Colorado School Journal, (monthly;) Aaron Gove, editor, J. D. Dillenback, pub- 
lisher, Denver. 

Hinsdale Phonograph; Walter E. Mendenhall, editor, W. E. Mendenhall and D. 
C. Loudon, proprietors, Lake City. 

Gunnison Review-Press, (tri-weekly,) Republican; H. C. Olney, manager, Review- 
Press Publishing Company, publishers, Gunnison. 

White Pine Cone, Republican; Geo. S. Irwin, editor, Gunnison. 

The Salida Mail, (semi-weekly;) C. F. Brown, editor, J. F. Erdlen, publisher, 
Erdlen & Brown, proprietors, Salida. 

Law and Gospel, (monthly;) W. H. Bauser, publisher, Springfield. 

OONNBCTIOUT. 

Quarterly Journal of Inebriety; T. D. Crothers, M.D., editor, published by the 
American Association for the Cure of Inebriates, Hartford. 

Travelers' Record, (monthly;) Travelers' Insurance Company, publishers, Hart- 
ford. 

DISTRICT or COLUMBIA. 

The Official Gazette of the United States Patent OflBce, (weekly,) Washington. 

United States OflBcial Postal Guide; The Brodix Publishing Co., Washington. 

Public Opinion; Public Opinion Co., publishers, Washington, A. H. Lewis, resi- 
dent manager, 140 Nassau street. New York. 

The National Tribune; Geo. E. Lemon, editor, Washington. 

United States Government Publications, (monthly catalogue;) J. H. Hickcox, 
publisher, Washington. 

DAKOTA. 

Bismarck Weekly Tribune, Republican; M. H. Jewell, publisher, Bismarck. 

FliOBIDA. 

The Florida Weekly Dispatch; Chas. W. Da Costa, publisher, A. K. Hammond, 
manager, Jacksonville. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 229 



GEOBGIA. 

Southern Industrial Railroad Record; conducted by A. L.Harris, Record Publish- 
ing Co., publishers, Atlanta. 

The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta. 

Spelman Messenger, (monthly;) L. A. Upton and M. J. Packard, editors, E. 0. 
Werden, publisher, Atlanta. 

ILLINOIS. 

Semi- Weekly Inter-Ocean; Inter-Ocean Publishing Company, Chicago. 

Industrial World and Iron Worker; F. W. Palmer, editor, Melvin M. Cohen, assist- 
ant manager, Chicago. 

The Standard, (religious;) Justin A. Smith, D. D., editor, Edward Goodman, E. R. 
and J. S. Dickerson, proprietors, Chicago. 

The Weekly Drovers' Journal; H. L. Goodall & Co., publishers, Chicago. 

The Svenska Amerikanaren; Swedish American Printing Co., publishers, Bong- 
gren and Waerner, editors, A. E. G. Wingard, business and advertising manager, 
Chicago. 

The American Antiquarian, and Oriental Journal, (bi-monthly;) Rev. Stephen D. 
Peet, editor and publisher, Mendon and Chicago. 

The Union Signal, organ of W. Is. T. U.; Mary Allen West, editor, Julia Ames, 
associate editor, Woman's Temperance Publication Association, publishers, Geo. C. 
Hall, business manager, Chicago. 

The Open Court; Dr. Paul Cams, editor. Open Court Publishing Company, pub- 
lishers, Chicago. 

The Comrade, (monthly;) H. E. Gerry, managing editor, Chicago. 

The Dial, (monthly;) A. C. McClurg & Co., publishers, Chicago. 

Watchman, (semi-monthly,) Y. M. C. A.; S. A. Taggart, editor, W. W. Vanarsdale, 
publisher, Chicago. 

The Chicago Express, Union Labor; D. P. Hubbard, editor and manager, Express 
Printing Co., publishers, Chicago, 

The Humane Journal, (monthly;) Albert W. Landon, publisher, Chicago. 

Pravda, mission work; A. E. Adams, publisher, Chicago. 

The Newspaper Union, (monthly;) J. F. Cramer, president, C. E. Strong, man- 
ager, Chicago. 

The Kindergarten, (monthly;) Cora L. Stockham and Emily A. Kellogg, editors, 
Alice B. Stockham & Co., publishers, Chicago. 

The Western Trail; published in the interest of the Rock Island Railroad, Chi- 
cago. 

Liberty Library; J. M. Foley, publisher, Chicago. 

The Odd Fellows' Herald; G. M. Adams, editor and manager, M. T. Scott, pub- 
lisher, Bloomington. 

Western Plowman; J. W. Warr, editor, L. B. Kuhn, business manager, Warr & 
Kuhn, proprietors, Moline. 

The National Educator; J. Bonham, editor and publisher. Rev. Francis Springer, 
associate editor, Springfield. 

INDIAN TEEBIXOBY. 

The Cherokee Advocate; W. P. Boudinot, editor, J. L. Springston, translator, 
Tahlequah. 

Indian Chieftain; John L. Adair, editor, M. E. Milford, manager, Chieftain Pub- 
lishing Co., publishers, Vinita. 

INDIANA. 

The Indiana State Journal; Journal Newspaper Co., publishers, Indianapolis. 
The Millstone and the Corn Miller, (monthly;) the D. H. Ranck Publishing Co., 



230 STATE HI8T0BICAL SOCIETY, 



(D. H. Ranck, president, A. K. Hallowell, vice-president, Lonis H. Gibson, secretary,) 
publishers, Indianapolis. 

Indiana Student, (semi-monthly;) Robertson &. Dresslar, editors, Bloomington. 

Mennonitische Rundschau, Mennonite Publishing Co., publishers, Elkhart. 



The Iowa Historical Record, (quarterly;) published by the State Historical So- 
ciety, M. W. Davis, secretary, Iowa City. 

liOniSIANA. 

Southwestern Christian Advocate; A. E. P. Albert, editor, published by the Metho- 
dist Book Concern, New Orleans. 

MABTIiAND. 

Johns Hopkins University Circulars, (monthly;) printed by John Murphy &Co^ 
Baltimore. 

The American Journal of Psychology, (quarterly;) G. Stanley Hall, editor, E. C. 
Sanford, publisher, Baltimore. 

Jottings, (monthly,) insurance; Jottings Co., proprietors, Baltimore. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Register, (quarterly;) John Ward Dean, 
editor, N. E. Historic Genealogical Society, publishers, Boston. 

The Woman's Journal; Lucy Stone, H. B. Blackwell and Alice Stone Blackwell, 
editors, Boston. 

The Unitarian Review and Religious Magazine, (monthly;) Jos. Henry Allen, 
editor, Boston. 

The Youth's Companion; Perry Mason & Co., publishers, Boston. 

Popular Science News, (monthly;) Austin P. Nichols, editor, W. J. Rolfe, asso- 
ciate editor, Seth C. Bassett, manager, Bcston. 

Harvard University Bulletin; Justin Winsor, editor, Cambridge. 

Library Notes, (quarterly;) Melvil Dewey, editor. Library Bureau, publishers, 
Boston. 

Estes and Lauriat's Monthly Book Bulletin, Boston. 

Saturday Evening Gazette; Henry G. Parker, editor and publisher, Boston. 

Journal of American Folk-Lore, (quarterly;) Franz Boas, T. Frederick Crane, 
J. Owen Dorsey, editors, W. W. Newell, general editor, Boston. 

The Writer, (monthly;) W. H. Hills, editor and publisher, Boston. 

The New-Jerusalem Magazine, (monthly,) religious; Massachusetts New-Church 
Union, publishers, Boston. 

American Teacher, (monthly,) educational; A. E. Winship and W. E. Sheldon, 
editors. New England Publishing Company, publishers, Boston. 

Spelling, (quarterly,) organ of the Spelling Reform Association; Melvil Dewey, 
editor, Boston. 

Martha's Vineyard Herald, Chas. Strahan, publisher. Cottage Hill. 

MICHIGAN. 

The Fireside Teacher, (monthly,) home culture; G. H. Bell, publisher, Battle 
Creek. 

Advent Review and Sabbath Herald; Uriah Smith, editor, L. A. Smith, associate 
editor, Seventh-Day Adventist Publishing Association, Battle Creek. 

The Unitarian, (monthly;) J. T. Sunderland, publisher, Ann Arbor. 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 231 



MISSOUBI. 

Kansas City Times, (daily;) Morrison Munford, president and manager, Charles 
E. Hasbrook, secretary, Times Publishing Co., publishers, Kansas City. 

Kansas City Daily Journal; Journal Co., publishers, Kansas City. 

The Kansas City Star, (daily,) Kansas City. 

The Evening News, (daily;) Willis J. Abbott, editor, N. E. Eisenlord, business 
manager, Kansas City. 

Kansas City Daily Traveler; Traveler Printing Co., H. B. Cooper, manager, Kansas 
City. 

Kansas City Live-Stock Indicator; The Indicator Publishing Company, publishers, 
Kansas City, 

The Kansas City Live-Stock Record and Farmer; J. H. Ramsey Printing Co., pro- 
prietors, Kansas City. 

Lanphear's Kansas City Medical Index, (monthly;) S. Emory Lanphear, editor 
and publisher, Kansas City. 

The Kansas City Record; A. N. Kellogg Newspaper Co., publishers, J. F. Guiwits, 
manager, Kansas City. 

Western Newspaper Union, Kansas City. 

The Mid-Continent, religious; Rev. A. A. E. Taylor, editor. Rev. William J. Lee, 
associate editor, Presbyterian Newspaper Co., publishers, Kansas City. 

The New West, (monthly;) Warren Watson, editor, The New West Publishing Co., 
publishers, Kansas City. 

The Herald; Herald Publishing Co., publishers, Kansas City. 

Missouri and Kansas Farmer, (monthly;) Cliffe M. Brooke, editor and publisher, 
Kansas City. 

Western Advocate, or Camp's Emigrant Guide, (monthly;) C. Rollin Camp, editor 
and publisher, Kansas City. 

The Sun, (bi-monthly;) C. T. Fowler, publisher, Kansas City. 

St. Joseph Herald, (daily and weekly;) William M. Shepherd, manager. Herald 
Publishing Co., publishers, St. Joseph. 

St. Joseph Weekly Gazette; Gazette Publishing Co., publishers, E. E. McCammon, 
secretary, St. Joseph. 

St. Louis Globe-Democrat, (daily;) Globe Printing Company, publishers, D. M. 
Houser, president, S. Ray, secretary, St. Louis. 

American Journal of Education, (monthly;) J. B. Merwin, managing editor, St. 
Louis. 

The Central Christian Advocate; Benj. St. James Fry, editor, Cranston &, Stowe, 
publishers, St. Louis. 

The Christian Evangelist; J. H. Garrison and B. W. Johnson, editors, J. J. Haley, 
office editor, Christian Publishing Company, publishers, St. Louis. 

The Altruist, (monthly;) devoted to common property and community homes; 
A. Longley, editor, St. Louis. 

St. Louis Herald, (monthly;) Charles A. Mantz, publisher, St. Louis. 

The Church Builder and Western Evangelist; H. C. Scotford, editor and pub- 
lisher, Kansas City, Mo., and Wichita, Kas. 

NEBRASKA. 

Western Resources; H. S. Reed, managing editor, Resources Publishing Com- 
pany, publishers, Lincoln. 

The Woman's Tribune; Clara Bewick Colby, editor and publisher, Beatrice. 

Western Newspaper Union; Newspaper Union Publishing Company, publishers, 
Omaha. 



232 STATE HI8T0B1CAL SOCIETY, 



Nebraska Congregational News; H. A. French, publisher, Lincoln. 
Nebraska State Journal, (daily and weekly;) Lincoln. 

NEW JEBSEY. 

The Journal of American Orthoepy, (monthly;) C. W. Larisun, editor, Ringos. 
Orchard and Garden; published by J. T. Lovett, Little Silver. 

NEW MEXICO. 

The Daily Citizen ; Thos. Hughes, editor and proprietor, Albuquerque. 
Las Vegas Daily Optic; R. A. Kistler, editor and proprietor. East Las Vegafc. 
Santa F6 Daily New Mexican; New Mexican Printing Company, publishers, 
Santa Fe. 

NEW YOBK. 

New York Tribune, (daily,) New York. 

The Daily Register; the New York law journal, New York. 

The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine; Century Company, publishers, Wm. 
W. Ellsworth, secretary, New York. 

Harper's Weekly; Harper «fe Bros., New York. 

Magazine of American History, (monthly;) Mrs. Martha J. Lamb, editor, New 
York. 

Scientific American; 0. D. Munn and A. E. Beach, editors and proprietors, New 
York. 

Science; Science Company, N. D. C. Hodges, publishers, New York. 

The Swiss Cross; Harlan H. Ballard, editor, N. D. C. Hodges, publisher. New 
York. 

Electrical Review; Geo. Worthington, editor, Chas. W. Price, associate editor, 
New York. 

The Library Journal, (monthly;) official organ of the American Library Assooia- 
tion; C. A. Cutter and R. R. Bowker, editors. New York. 

The Cooperative Index to Periodicals, (quarterly;) W. I. Fletcher, editor, New 
York. 

The American Missionary, (monthly;) published by the American Missionary 
Association, Rev. W. M. Taylor, D. D., LL. D., president. New York. 

The Home Missionary, (monthly;) published by the American Home Missionary 
Society, Alexander H. Clapp, D. D., Treasurer, New York. 

The Nation, New York. 

Political Science Quarterly; edited by the Faculty of Political Science of Colum- 
bia College, Ginn <fe Co., publishers, New York. 

Appleton Literary Bulletin; D. Appleton <fe Co., publishers. New York. 

The Irish World; Patrick Ford, editor and proprietor, New York. 

New York Weekly Witness; John Dougall & Co., publishers. New York. 

The Voice; Funk & Wagnalls, publishers, New York. 

The Decorator and Furnisher, (monthly;) T. A. Kennett, editor, W. P. Wheeler, 
business manager. The Art Trades Publishing Company, publishers. New York. 

Student's Journal; Andrew J. Graham, editor and proprietor, New York. 

Sabbath Reading; John Dougall & Co., publishers, New York. 

The Phonographic World, (monthly;) E. N. Miner, publisher, New York. 

The Library Magazine, John B. Alden, publisher. New York. 

The National Temperance Advocate; J. N. Stearns, secretary and publishing 
agent, New York. 

The Publishers' Weekly, (a book trade journal;) R. R. Bowker, manager. New York. 

The Husbandman, Elmira. 

Public Opinion; Public Opinion Co., publishers. New York and Washington. 



Sixth Biennial Repoet. 233 



The New York Pioneer; John Dougall & Co., publishers, New York. 

The New Princeton Review, (bi-monthly;) A. C. Armstrong & Son publishers, 
New York. 

The Tariff League Bulletin; published by the American Protective Tariff League, 
New York. 

Demorest's Monthly Magazine; W. Jennings Demorest, publisher, New York. 

The North American Review, (monthly;) Allen Thorndike Rice, editor, New York. 

Sheltering Arms, (monthly,) New York. 

Scribner's Magazine, (monthly;) Chas. Scribner's Sons, publishers. New York. 

The Globe; The North American Exchange Company, publishers. New York. 

Judge; I. M. Gregory, editor, W. J. Arkell, publisher. New York. 

The Standard; Henry George, editor and proprietor. New York. 

The Book Buyer, (monthly;) Chas. Scribner's Sons, New York. 

The Bibliographer, (monthly;) Moulton, Weuborne and Co., publishers, Buffalo. 

Garden and Forest; conducted by Prof. C. S. Sargent, The Garden and Forest 
Publishing Company, publishers. New York. 

Book Chat; Brentano's, publishers, New York. 

The Literary News, (monthly,) New York. 

The Library Bulletin of Cornell University, Ithaca. 

The Book Mart, (monthly;) Halkett Lord, literary editor, New York. 

The Youth's Temperance Banner; J. N. Stearns, corresponding secretary and 
publishing agent. New York. 

OHIO. 

Magazine of Western History, (monthly;) J. H. Kennedy, editor, Cleveland. 

Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly; Prof. George W. Knight, Prof. W. 
H. Venable, Prof. B. A. Hinsdale and Prof. G. F. Wright, editorial committee, A. H. 
Smythe, publisher, Columbus. 

Weekly Times, Cincinnati. 

The Christian Press; published by the Western Tract Society, Cincinnati. 

Christian Standard; Isaac Errett, editor-in-chief, Cincinnati. 

American Grange Bulletin; F. P. Wolcott, editor, Cincinnati. 

Farm and Fireside, (semi-monthly;) Mast, Crowell <fe Kirkpatrick, editors and 
proprietors, Springfield and Philadelphia, Pa. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Public Ledger, (daily;) G. W. Childs, editor and publisher, Philadelphia. 

Faith and Works; published by the Woman's Christian Association; Miss H. V. 
Wriggins, business manager. Miss A. C. Webb, editor, Philadelphia. 

The Naturalist's Leisure Hour, (monthly;) A. E. Foote, editor and publisher, Phila- 
delphia. 

Farmers' Friend and Grange Advocate; R. H. Thomas, editor, Mechanicsburg. 

Building Association and Home Journal, (monthly;) Michael J. Brown, editor 
and proprietor, Philadelphia. 

Paper and Press, (monthly ;) W. M. Patton, publisher and proprietor, Philadelphia. 

American Manufacturer and Iron World; Jos. D. Weeks, editor, Pittsburgh. 

Poultry Keeper, (monthly;) P. H. Jacobs, editor. Poultry Company, publishers, 
Parkesburg and Philadelphia. 

Book News; John Wanamaker, publisher, Philadelphia. 

The Book^Mart, (monthly;) Halkett Lord, literary editor, Book Mart Publishing 
Co., publishers, Pittsburgh. 

The Red Man, (monthly;) printed by Indian boys at the Indian School, M. Bur- 
gess, business manager, Carlisle. 



234 State Histobical Society. 

TENNESSBB. 

Agrionltaral Science, (monthly;) Ghas. S. Plumb, editor, Knoxville. 

TEXAS. 

Oanadian Free Press; L. V. Harm, editor and proprietor, Canadian. 

The Canadian Crescent; Freeman E. Miller, Canadian. 

Texas Live-Stock Journal; Stock Journal Publishing Company, publishers. Fort 
Worth. 

The Southern Mercury; State Alliance Publishing Company, P. S. Browder, busi- 
ness manager, Dallas. 

VEBMONT. 

The Woman's Magazine, (monthly;) Esther T. Housh, editor, Frank E. Hoosh &. 
Co., publishers, Brattleboro. 

VIBGINIA. 

Southern Workman and Hampton School Record; S. C. Armstrong, H. W. Lud- 
low and M. F. Armstrong, editors, F. N. Gilman, business manager, printed by 
negro and Indian students, Hampton. 

WISCONSIN. 

Wisconsin State Journal; David Atwood, proprietor, Madison. 

CANADA. 

The Herald, phonetic; The Herald Publishing Co., publishers, Toronto. 

FBANCE. 

Soci^t^ de G^ograpie, Compte rendu des Stances de la Commission Centrale, 
(semi-monthly;) Paris. 

Bulletin de la Soci^t^ de Gdographie, (quarterly,) Paris. 

Chronique de la Soci^t^ des Gens de Lettres, (monthly,) Paris. 

Bulletin des Stances de la Soci^t6 Nationale d' Agriculture de France, (monthly,) 
Paris. 

Bulletin de la Minist^re de 1' Agriculture, (monthly,) Paris. 



Sixth Biexxial Report. 235 



MEETINGS, 1889-90. 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL MEETING. 

The thirteenth annual meeting of the Society was held in the hall of the 
House of Kepresentatives, Tuesday evening, January 15, 1889; Hon. Ed- 
ward Russell, President of the Society, in the chair. 

An address was delivered by Hon. James Humphrey, of Junction City, 
on the subject "Kansas, West of Topeka, Prior to 1865 ;" a paper prepared 
by John C. McCoy, of Kansas City, Mo., on the subject of the "Survey of 
the Indian Lands of Kansas," was read by Hon. T. D. Thacher; and a 
paper on the subject of the "Rescue of Dr. John Doy," was read by Maj. 
James B. Abbott, of DeSoto. 

On motion, the amendment to the constitution of the Society submitted 
at the annual meeting, 1888, was adopted, in the following words : 

"The elective oflScers of the Society shall consist of a President and two Vice- 
Presidents, who shall hold their offices for the term of one year, and until their suc- 
cessors shall be chosen ; and a Secretary and a Treasurer, who shall hold their 
offices for the term of two years, and until their successors shall be chosen ; said 
officers to be chosen by the Board of Directors from their members, their election 
to be made at the first meeting of the Board subsequent to the annual meeting 
of the Society, and their terms of office shall begin at the date of their election 
and qualification in office." 

On motion of Hon. D. W. Wilder, Hon. Joel Moody, of Linn county, was 
invited to deliver an address before the Society at some time during the 
winter. 

The committee on nominations reported the following names for members 
of the Board of Directors for the term of three years next ensuing: 

F. G. Adams, Topeka ; Henry Booth, Larned ; E. T. Carr, Leavenworth ; James 
Christian, Arkansas City ; Ed. Carroll, Leavenworth ; E. J. Dallas, Topeka ; W. C. 
Edwards, Larned; L. R. Elliott, Manhattan ; J. S. Emery, Lawrence; N. S. Goss, 
Topeka ; B. J. F. Hanna, Wa-Keeney ; R. R. Hays, Osborne ; D. N. Heizer, Great 
Bend ; F. M. Hills, Cedar Vale ; C. K. Holliday, Topeka ; Scott Hopkins, Horton ; F. 
Wellhouse, Fairmount ; James Humphrey, Junction City ; C. J. Jones, Garden City ; 
P. G. Lowe, Leavenworth ; Geo. W. Martin, Kansas City ; J. R. Mead, Wichita ; Joel 
Moody, Mound City ; George R. Peck, Topeka ; Adrian Reynolds, Sedan ; John 
Schilling, Hiawatha ; B. F. Simpson, Topeka ; Jacob Stotler, Wellington ; W. D. 
Street, Decatur ; C. A. Swensson, McPhefson ; D. MoTaggart, Liberty ; T. D. Thacher, 
Topeka ; Z. T. Walrond, Osborne. 

The Board of Directors elected the following officers : 

President, Col. William A. Phillips, Salina; Vice-Presidents, Col. Cyrus 
K. Holliday, Topeka, and Hon. James S. Emery, Lawrence; Secretary, 
F. G. Adams; Treasurer, Hon. John Francis. 
—16 



236 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

The following committees were appointed for the ensuing year : 

Executive Committee — Governor L. U. Humphrey, Hon. T. Dwight 
Thacher, Hon. Albert R. Greene, Hon. N. A. Adams, Hon. F. P. Baker. 

Legislative Committee — Hon. James S. Emery, Hon. F. P. Baker, Hon. T. 
Dwight Thacher, Col. C. K. Holliday, Hon. A. R. Greene. 

The meeting then adjourned. 



SPECIAL MEETING FEBRUARY 4, 1889. 

On call of the President and Secretary a meeting of the Historical So- 
ciety was held in its rooms Monday evening, February 4th, to hear a paper 
read by Senator Joel Moody, on the subject, "Alvar Nunez Cabeea de Vaca." 
The meeting was called to order by Vice-President Hon. James S. Emery, 
of Lawrence. 

At the conclusion of Senator Moody's address a vote of thanks was ex- 
tended to him, and a copy of his address solicited for publication in the 
Transactions of the Society. 



SPECIAL MEETING FEBRUARY 11, 1889. 

On Monday evening, February 11, 1889, the Historical Society met in 
the Senate Chamber, for the purpose of listening to an address delivered 
by Senator H. B. Kelly, in accordance with an invitation which had been 
extended to him by vote of the Society. The subject was, "No Man's 
Land." At the conclusion of the reading, the thanks of the Society were 
extended to the Senator, together with a request for a copy of his address 
for publication in its Transactions. 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL MEETING. 

At the annual meeting, January 21, 1890, in the absence of President 
Wm. A. Phillips, Vice-President C. K. Holliday presided. 

Hon. T. D. Thacher read the annual address prepared by President Phil- 
lips, entitled " Lights and Shadows of Kansas History." 

Hon. Percival G. Lowe read a paper entitled " Kansas as seen in the 
Indian Territory." 

Hon. A. R. Greene read an eulogium, prepared by Hon. B. F. Simpson, 
on the late Governor John A. Martin. 

Col. A. S. Johnson, Col. Thomas Ewing, Hon. Edward Russell, Hon. 
John Brady and Rev. John G. Pratt were, by vote, invited to prepare pa- 
pers to present to the next annual meeting. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 237 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year : 

President, Col. Cyrus K. Holliday, Topeka; Vice-Presidents, Hon. James 

S. Emery, Lawrence, and Governor Lyman U. Humphrey, Independence. 
The following were elected members of the Board of Directors for the 

term ending January 17, 1893: 

J. B. Abbott, DeSoto; N. A. Adams, Manhattan; Geo. T. Anthony, Ottawa; F. W. 
Blackmar, Lawrence; James H. Canfield, Lawrence; Richard Cordley, Lawrence; J. 
H. Downing, Hays City; R. G. Elliott, Lawrence; Henry Elliston, Atchison; Geo. T. 
Fairchild, Manhattan; Geo. D. Hale, Topeka; Wm. Higgins, Topeka; E. W. Hoch, 
Marion; Edgar W. Howe, Atchison; J. K. Hudson, Topeka; A. S. Johnson, Topeka; 
H. B. Kelly, McPherson; L. B, Kellogg, Emporia; C. H. Kimball, Parsons; J. A. 
Lippincott, Topeka; Timothy McCarthy, Larned; T. A. McNeal, Medicine Lodge; 
Peter McVicar, Topeka; Sol. Miller, Troy; M. M. Murdock, Wichita; T. B. Murdock, 
El Dorado; Noble Prentis, Newton; Wm. M. Rice, Fort Scott; Chas. F. Scott, lola; 
A, W. Smith, McPherson; A. R. Taylor, Emporia; W. A. Quayle, Baldwin City; D. A. 
Valentine, Clay Center. 



f 



COLLECTIONS 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

1886—1890. 
AND EXECUTIVE MINUTES OF GOVERNOR JOHN W. GEARY. 



PRESIDENT'S ADDEESS. 



[At the annual meeting of the Society, January 17, 1888, Hon. D. W, Wilder, 
President of the Society, delivered the following address :] 

Beginnings are the hardest. This Society made the beginning of its li- 
brary in a book-case in the State Auditor's office. Next, its domicile was under 
the Senate stairway, in the northwest corner of the east wing of the State 
House. Its third home was a room on the lower floor of the north side of 
the east wing. When the west wing was completed the present rooms were 
occupied, and were believed to be spacious enough to last twenty years. 
Four years ago the rooms were crowded, and there was an overflow into a 
large unfinished room in the basement. The Society is not yet thirteen years 
old, it has upwards of 40,000 volumes, and still our friends in this State and 
other States are sending us precious gifts, and we care for them the best we 
can. Last year Judge Adams had book-cases made and placed in the hall 
of this wing, and some people stuck up their noses and said it was a desecra- 
tion of these handsome corridors. Mr. Dennis, the State Librarian, has had 
similar cases made and placed in the halls of the east wing. He also had 
an overflow that filled one room in the cellar. The State Library is also 
growing with great rapidity. But the walls of the central building of our 
capitol are now going up with reasonable speed, and the State House Com- 
missioners assure us that both libraries shall have ample room when that 
lofty building is completed. 

A society and library that have grown so fast must have had good friends 
at the beginning. This Society had; it has ever been fortunate. The first 
donor of books and the first President was Samuel A. Kingman, then Chief 
Justice of State. His interest in the Society and his influence were very' 
great, and they have continued from the hour of its birth. Our State his- 
tory has no nobler name than Kingman's, and it will live with the life of 
the State. 

The most persistent, efficient and steadfast early friend of the Society was 
Hon. Floyd P. Baker. Without his work the Society would have failed. 
He was the publisher and editor of the Commonwealth, i\iQ leading State pa- 
per, as he still is, and he not only wrote hundreds of articles for the Society, 
but he did its printing on credit, when nobody else would trust it, and he 
gave it the benefit of his good judgment and rare business sagacity. For 
years he has been the business head of the Society, giving his time and la- 

(241) 



242 STATE HL^TORIC.iL SOCIETY. 

bor freely and with generous enthusiasm. Mr. Baker has also been the 
President of the Society, and his unselfish labors will continue while life 
lasts. 

Two other names only will be mentioned at this time. They do not com- 
plete the list, by any means, but, on other occasions, and from time to time, 
the record will be made complete. Those names are, of course, Judge Adams 
and his daughter. Miss Zu Adams. Other persons have aided the Society 
and library; these two have given all of their time, and have made both. 
They were born for the work. They have had a full intellectual apprecia- 
tion of the scope of such a society, and their hearts and their hands have 
been nobly devoted to the work. In a world of money-making and of ma- 
terial success, they have turned aside from popular paths and entered these 
cloisters, and labored here, at the expense of health and wealth — always 
with good cheer, kindness, and magnanimity. Judge Adams not only knows 
history: he knows geology; he knows the mound-builders of the prehistoric 
age. He has no theologic hatred, and is as friendly to Catholic as to Prot- 
estant missionaries; as fair and impartial to one Protestant sect as to 
another. This library already contains the fullest religious history of all 
denominations in Kansas that can be obtained anywhere, and additions are 
constantly coming in. Judge Adams has been an Indian agent; not one of 
the kind that plundered the Red man, but one who met him in kindness as a 
brother man. And Judge Adams was active and influential, in Territorial 
days, in making Kansas free. He knew all of the actors in that national 
revolution. So free is he from bigotry and malice that he is the warm per- 
sonal friend of the pro-slavery men of that period who still live in the State. 
They also come here with their treasures, glad and proud that Kansas is 
free and the nation is free. Our antagonist is our helper, and this library 
is the repository of everything that relates to Kansas history. It is most 
fortunate — a good fortune not to be estimated — that its founder and builder. 
Judge Adams, is a man of broad and catholic mind. He is a Kansan, and 
nothing relating to Kansas is foreign to him. And so the Society and li- 
brary are founded upon the everlasting rock. 

One profession, friendly to this Society and forming the largest part of it, 
deserves the best words in the dictionary. The editors and publishers have 
all been its friends from the start. They made Kansas, and it was enough 
for them to crown the work with a little job of this kind. A united press 
can move Kansas, the world, and the whole solar system, and remain fresh 
and vigorous enough to tackle some other trifle the next day. Having 
made an interesting effort of this kind, most of the papers would say: "A 
large mass of entertaining matter, necessarily crowded out of this issue, will 
appear in the evening edition." 

The newspapers of Kansas are still the life and the main support of the 
Historical Society. The publishers cheerfully send all of their papers here, 
and the Society preserves and binds them. They make the history of the 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 243 

State. The Society was started at the right time to secure the files of all 
the important papers published in the Territorial period. We have the 
Leavenworth Herald, the first paper in English published on our soil, and 
we have the files of the pioneer papers of Lawrence, Topeka and other lo- 
calities. Stray copies of early papers are still coming in, and all are valua- 
ble. The printed w^ord is much more correct than the remembered word, 
even of the person who has the most retentive memory. The memory, like 
the physical system, changes every seven years. 

When this Society was founded, in 1875, only half of Kansas had been 
settled, and every paper of every town and county in the new half is pre- 
served in this library. The local items, the legal and business advertise- 
ments, the school and church notices, and the election returns, contain the 
name of every man and woman who has taken any noticeable part in mak- 
ing half of Kansas — the better half, perhaps; certainly a very lively and 
wide-awake people, occupying 40,000 square miles in the heart of the con- 
tinent. 

Facts like these show you what the Society has done and is doing; why it 
is prosperous and popular ; why so many people are interested in its destiny. 



244 State historical Society 



PERSONAL REMINISCENCES AND KANSAS EMIGRATION, 1855. 



[A paper read before the meeting of the State Historical Society by Prof. Isaac 
T. Goodnow, at the annual meeting, January 17, 1888.] 

The Missouri Compromise of 1820 limited slavery to the south of the 
line of 36° 30' north, a little south of the southern line of Kansas. A re- 
peal of this by the Kansas and Nebraska act of 1854 opened a vast terri- 
tory to the introduction of slavery, and left its introduction or exclusion, to 
actual settlers. They could "vote it up" or "vote it down"! The design 
of the South was to make Kansas a slave State. The great problem for 
solution was, which great party of the Nation could most rapidly throw in 
its emigrants. The State of Missouri was the natural gateway through 
which the tide of emigration, both slave and free, swept. 

The populous, wealthy counties of western Missouri were slavery's strong- 
hold, and gave it a great advantage. First, they could close this gateway 
at their discretion. Second, under the leadership of David Atchison, Vice- 
President of the United States, they formed the Blue Lodges of Missouri, 
containing thousands of members, sworn to obey their leaders and to estab- 
lish slavery in Kansas. At election-times, armed with shot-guns and rifles, 
bow^ie-knives and revolvers, with the inevitable barrel of whisky, they would 
pour over the borders, take possession of the various places of voting, and 
" v^ote up" slavery. 

To promote Free-State emigration the New England Emigrant Aid Com- 
pany was formed. It organized emigration ; friends and neighbors went 
together, and had each other's society in the new country; the fare was 
greatly reduced, on the railroads, and at the hotels on the route, and much 
care and anxiety was saved by sending with each company a superintendent, 
who "knew the ropes" and could render assistance in any emergency. 
Great central points were selected by the company, hotels erected, steam 
mills provided, and town companies organized. Pamphlets and newspapers 
were scattered broadcast over the free North. The best lecturers, the most 
gifted orators sounded the tocsin of alarm. In vivid colors they pictured 
the dangers of Kansas, with the beauty and value of the Territory for settle- 
ment. Their trains left Boston at regular intervals with 25 to 200 emi- 
grants, with recruits added by the way. The route was by Albany, Cleve- 
land, Chicago, Alton, and thence by steamer 18 miles to St. Louis, whence 
passage was taken by steamer up the Missouri to Kansas City, Leavenworth, 
and Atchison. The Hannibal & St. Jo. and the Missouri Pacific railroads 
were not then built. This was the route from the East till the crowds were 
so great that the slaveholders in alarm closed the gate and turned back the 



Sixth Biexxial repobt, 245 



crowd. After this the main current of emigration set in overland, by Iowa 
and a corner of Nebraska, by what is called " Lane's route." 

The Crusade found me in the beautiful town of East Greenwich, R. I., on 
Narragansett Bay, teaching in a Methodist institution. I had been an Anti- 
Slavery voter ever since 1840, and was one of the 7,000 who first voted for 
James G. Birney in the hard-cider and log-cabin campaign, w'hich resulted 
in the election of General Harrison. Fully believing that the rule of 
Slavery or of Freedom in the nation would be settled on the prairies of 
Kansas, I felt impelled to throw myself into the scale on the side of Free- 
dom. I corresponded with Dr. Jos. Denison, then preaching in Boston. We 
met in the city of Providence, in December, 1854, and listened to a rousing 
lecture by Eli Thayer, the founder of the New England Emigrant Aid Com- 
pany. With him, after the lecture we discussed the pros and cons of the 
enterprise till near midnight. The decision was for emigration. 

My professorship was immediately resigned, and three months were spent 
in private correspondence, writing for the newspapers, with considerable 
talking and travel to help on the cause. The time set for our company 
of some 200 to leave Boston was March 13, 1855. After consultation with 
Eli Thayer, J. M. S. Williams and Dr. Robinson — now Gov. Robinson — 
it was thought best for me to leave on the 6th of March, one week ahead of 
the main company, in order to select a town-site with good farm claims 
around, to be ready at their coming, and thus save the unpleasantness of 
waiting. On this train I met for the first time Rev. C. H. Lovejoy, of New 
Hampshire, who with others, as he said, had started for Kansas from a let- 
ter of mine in a Boston paper. His wife was an intellectual woman, skilled 
in polemics, and amused us greatly by the way she handled and silenced 
some of the skeptics who made themselves prominent in loud expressions of 
unbelief. We found Chicago then, as I first heard the expression — "a 
right smart chance of a place" — with some 30,000 or 40,000 inhabitants. 
Nothing beautiful about it — muddy streets, miserable depots and poor 
hotels. We were glad to get out of it. On the Chicago & Alton Railroad 
we first witnessed a prairie fire; beautiful and grand we then thought, but a 
mere rush-light compared to what we can get up in Kansas ! St. Louis we 
thought a respectable city. 

Our trip up the Missouri of eight days on the Kate Swinney, Captain 
Choteau, was a remarkably pleasant one. We had 120 emigrants, with 
about 100 U. S. cavalry with a fine band of music. For a wonder, almost 
everybody was Free-State, and we had our own way in about everything. 
Luke P. Lincoln, our superintendent, was a fine singer, and organized a glee 
club which sang the songs of Liberty, "the homes of the brave and the 
land of the free," to be wrought out on the prairies of Kansas. Never was a 
company more popular with the ofiicers of the boat or with the soldiers. 
The military band interspersed their music with ours, and " all went merry 
as a marriage bell." At one of the wood-landings I was much surprised to 



246 STATE HiSTOIilCAL SOCIETY. 

meet an old pupil, Francis B. Smith — though I ought not to have been, 
as I had had 5,000 of them, and they were scattered everywhere. He was 
bound for Kansas on the boat ahead of us, and had run down from a land- 
ing just above. We reached Kansas City March 18th, a cold, clear Sabbath 
morning. 

On Monday our people were busy purchasing oxen and horses and wagons 
for the trip into Kansas. Here for the first time I met General Pomeroy ; 
he had just returned with his horse and buggy from a trip up the Smoky 
Hill, 100 miles above Fort Riley, exploring the country entirely alone. 
We set up that night till 2 o'clock, settling the question as to where our 
company should go. With remarkable accuracy he described the country 
at the junction of the Republican and Smoky Hill, where Junction City 
now is, and at the junction of the Big Blue and Kansas rivers, where Man- 
hattan now is. With singular foresight he foretold that the Government 
bridge at Juniata would be soon washed away and the travel would eventu- 
ally go over the Blue near its mouth, and Juniata become extinct — a 
prophecy which speedily came to pass. The next day with a committee of 
seven, with a good two-horse team we started west, passing through West- 
port, and traveled seventeen miles to the cabin of a Shawnee Indian by the 
name of Ham, who gave us the privilege of occupying his cabin at 25 cents 
a head. We could sit up by a fire in a large open fire-place, or lie down 
on the floor in our own blankets. It was a puncheon floor with cracks 
large enough to put your hands through, and it was cold and the draft was 
lively ! I got a cold that lasted me six weeks, and I shall never forget 
Ham. 

The second day we reached Lawrence, a rude town of some forty or fifty 
log and rough board cabins with a "caravansary" for immigrants, built of 
sod walls and cloth roof, with prairie hay for a carpet, and furnished with 
a cooking stove. I slept that night upon the floor of the Herald of Freedom 
printing office as a special favor from the editor, Geo. W. Brown, and was 
grateful for the privilege. 

On the third day we reached Topeka, stopping at a log hotel, situated on 
the bottom near where the old steam saw mill stood so long, and near where 
now stands the cracker factory. On this flat were half a dozen cabins, log 
and shake cabins. A shake cabin was covered with clapboards, split from 
logs, usually oak. Here for the first time I met Col. Holliday, the founder 
of the Capital City, a scholarly gentleman of fine conversational powers and 
with high hopes ; yet I very much doubt whether they reached to the 
height he has since attained! With him I was delighted to find Lucius C. 
Wilmarth, another pupil of mine, who had cast in his lot with the Colonel 
to found a city. 

The fourth day we passed a number of loaded teams, Pennsylvanians 
bound for Pawnee, Gov. Reeder's town, soon after wiped out by an order 
from Jeff Davis, then Secretary of War, because on the Fort Riley reserve. 



Sixth Biexxial Re poet. 247 

Leavenworth, situated on a Government reserve, was allowed to remain — 
because it was Pro-Slavery, while Reeder's town was Free-State; it was a 
flourishing settlement with 500 inhabitants — as monuments two stone build- 
ings left. We found the Catholic Mission at St. Marys, established in 1835, 
in successful operation, with its numerous Pottawatomie cabins clustered 
around it, and very convenient for obtaining necessary supplies for man or 
beast. At night we camped on Graymore's floor, seven miles west of the 
Mission, on Lost creek. He was a retired Californian who had married a 
"likely" Pottawatomie squaw and a fine farm with her! At 1 o'clock we 
were awakened by the arrival of the U. S. mail for Fort Eiley. The car- 
rier emptied his bag upon the floor, and found a valuable book, directed to 
someone beyond. He says, "I will take that — the fellow don't need it!" 

The fifth day, on the Government road, five miles above where Manhat- 
tan is now situated, on the Big Blue, we struck Juniata, a little Pro-Slavery 
town, close by a Government bridge, built at an expense of $10,000. The 
principal man was an old "six-foot" Virginian by the name of Dyer, of the 
Methodist Church South. His cabin as described by an exploring mission- 
ary was "one story high and three stories long!" His wife excused him to 
the same missionary for not saying grace at the table, by saying, "My old 
man, since coming to the new country has lost his manners." They kept a 
sort of free hotel and a small store. It was a preaching-place for all de- 
nominations. And it w^as customary after the sermon to invite everybody 
to dinner. They were a noble, generous-hearted old couple, but their free 
table and dishonest clerks soon got away with most of their property. The 
destruction of the bridge, the following winter, and the changing of the 
Government road, with the rivalry of Manhattan, which followed, eflect- 
ually wiped out the town. In Kansas no Pro-Slavery town could live by 
the side of a Free-State town ! 

One mile west of Juniata we found Rev. Charles E. Blood, a missionary 
of the Congregational church, to whom I had letters of introduction. With 
him for a guide we walked some three miles and ascended from the north 
what is now called Bluemont Hill. Taking position upon the top of an In- 
dian mound, Saturday evening, March 24, 1855, just as the sun was resting 
on the western hills, we first looked upon the most beautiful town-site that 
we had ever beheld. With the old Grecian philosopher when he had dis- 
covered the law of specific gravity, I felt like exclaiming Eureka! Eureka! ! 
I have found it! I have found it! Our expectations were more than 
met. The decision of the committee was to look no farther, and to sum- 
mon the remaining company to hurry up as soon as possible to be ready for 
the election on the 30th and to secure the town-site. We soon learned that 
in the fall of 1854 Geo. S. Park had located a town-site on the Kansas river, 
at the southwestern part of the present site, and had named it Poliska. He 
had built a log cabin upon it for a blacksmith shop, and a big Virginian, 
one of the Juniata outfit, had jumped his claim by breaking into the cabin, 



248 State Histobical Society. 

taking possession, nominally living there, but really at old man Dyer's, 
where board was better and cheaper. 

At the northeast part of the town-site, upon the Big Blue, the same fall, 
S. D. Houston of Illinois, Judge Saunders W. Johnston of Ohio, Judge J. M. 
Russell of Iowa, Dr. H. A. Wilcox of Rhode Island, and E. M. Thurston 
of Maine, five graduates from five diflferent States, met and located the town 
of Canton. A dugout at the base of Bluemont marked their only improve- 
ment. Our committee of Isaac T. Goodnow, Luke P. Lincoln, Charles H. 
Lovejoy, N. R. Wright, C. N. Wilson and Joseph Wintermute, decided at 
once to consolidate these two companies with their own, and form one strong 
company. After careful deliberation, on the 26th I pitched my tent upon 
Park's town-site, about 30 rods from his blacksmith shop, with the design, 
of course, to neutralize any legal claim that our friend, the Virginian, might 
have. Myself and Wintermute slept there the first night. It was cold and 
clear ; the stars shone brightly and we were happy. We were reinforced by 
our company in season to vote for the first Territorial legislators on the 
30th, and aided in the election of S. D. Houston and Martin F. Conway, 
Representative and Counselor, the only Free-State men in the Border-Ruf- 
fian Legislature. Gov. Walker, a Wyandotte chief, with several half-breeds 
and Pro-Slavery voters from Wyandotte, came up, but they had not calcu- 
lated on the vote of our company, and thus failed in this instance to elect 
their men. The plan was to import a sufficient number of men in every 
district to make a clean sweep, and elect every Pro-Slavery candidate. 

On the morning of election day, while at the polls in Juniata, for the 
first time I met Martin, the Virginian, who warned me from his claim. 
The reply was not at all assuring. In the afternoon, while away from my 
tent, on the Blue, I saw a crowd of men, afoot and on horses, coming down 
the mountain at the northwest. I started for my tent, but they reached it 
first. One excited fellow fired a bullet through the tent just over the head 
of Lincoln, whom I had left asleep and alone in the tent, and another com- 
menced cutting the cords of the tent. This waked up Lincoln with the 
exclamation, " What does this mean?" The reply was, we had abused 
Martin and jumped his claim, and they were going to throw the tent into 
the river. Lincoln says, " Hold on ! This is Mr. Goodnow's tent and he 
will be here soon to answer any demand ! " One young man, finely mounted 
and good-looking, with military air, rode out to meet me. Saluting as he 
came up, he says, "Mr. Goodnow, I believe?" Recognizing the fact, he 
says, "I understand there is a difficulty about a claim here, and we have 
come down to settle it." "All right," I replied, and we returned together, 
talking of the weather and anything but the case in hand. On approach- 
ing a motley, hard-looking crowd, with rifles, shot-guns, bowie-knives and 
pistols, all ready for use, they eyed me as though I had been some danger- 
ous wild beast that ought to be killed, or caged. I coolly and pleasantly 
said, "Good afternoon, gentlemen," which salutation was returned, but not 



Sixth biexxial Repobt. 249 

with very good grace. By this time four of iDy men were present, and it 
was proposed to organize by the appointment of a chairman and secretary, 
which was done. It was then moved that the two parties interested should 
state their grievances and claims. 

On the morning of pitching my tent, some one, an enemy of Martin, had 
gone ahead of us, broken into Park's cabin and thrown Martin's bed, buf- 
falo, blankets and flour down the bank of the Kansas river, evidently to 
get up a quarrel between Martin and us. My men gathered up what they 
could and returned them to the cabin, saving all but the flour and bed. 
Martin spoke first, evidently believing that we were parties to the raid 
■on the cabin, and declaring his right to the claim. I replied, and think 
that I convinced all present that we had no hand in the damage to his 
property; and secondly, that I had acted in good faith in making my im- 
provements, and fully believed that Martin had committed a trespass in 
breaking into Park's cabin. 

A committee of five was appointed by the chairman, three to represent 
the majority and two the minority, and to decide what w-as to be done. 
They unanimously reported that I should have till the next day at 1 o'clock 
to remove my tent and find a new home. I replied that, in view of the fact 
that they had the physical power to remove me, I would submit to the re- 
port, under protest. My equestrian friend says, "Your protest, I suppose, 
has reference to a settlement of the case before some legal tribunal." " Cer- 
tainly," was the reply; and they saw that I had the advantage. The out- 
come was that Martin after loafing around the cabin a few days got tired 
and lonesome, and offering to compromise at a less price than would pay 
the lawyer's fees in case of contest, we accepted his offer, and a few days 
later I carried him to the river on his way to Old Virginia. In our camp- 
ing out we slept side by side and parted good friends. I do not know of 
another case of the kind in Kansas, settled without a fight. 

April 4th a meeting was called for the formation of a new town com- 
pany from the consolidation of the old companies with ours. It proved suc- 
cessful, and the company thus formed was called the "Boston Association," 
and the town-site was named "Boston." The names of the members of the 
Boston association were: Geo. S. Park, S. D. Houston, S. W. Johnston, J. M. 
Russell, E. M. Thurston, H. A. Wilcox, members of the old organization; 
and Isaac T. Goodnow, C. E. Blood, C. H. Lovejoy, Joseph Denison, Wm. 
E. Goodnow, Amory Hunting, Luke P. Lincoln, I. S. Childs, S. Whitehorn, 
C. N. Wilson, A. Browning, Newell Trafton, Tunis J. Roosa, John Hoar, 
John Flagg, C. W. Bebee, G. F. Brown, Charles Barnes, Stephen Barnes, 
Cyrus Bishop, Martin F. Conway, J. H. McClure, W. McClure, E. C. Per- 
sons, Frank B. Smith, Truman Shattuck, B. Wheldon, H. B. Neely, and T. 
C. Wells, of the new arrivals; in all thirty-five members, of whom twenty- 
four were present. 

To save the town-site from jumpers, several shake houses were built, and 



260 STATE HllSTORICAL SOCIETY. 

one placed on each quarter-section, with some one to occupy and hold it as 
a claim till we could preempt with a "float." This was an Indian land 
warrant for 640 acres of land, and was transferable by purchase. 

We were soon reinforced by quite a number from Dr. Denison's com- 
pany, which left Boston one week later than ours. He was detained in 
Kansas City by the loss of a child, and was down with a fever himself for 
several weeks. Not half of his company ever reached us. It was too far 
out ! They stopped by the way, or became discouraged from the hardships 
and returned, not having counted the cost to begin with. Even of those 
who reached us, probably one-half left us the first season. It required 
special effort to drive oS' homesickness. I told them I had come to Kansas 
to help make it a free State, and should remain till that was accomplished, 
if they all left. About the last of May, John Pipher and Andrew J. 
Mead, in the steamer Hartford, with some seventy-five settlers, arrived 
from Cincinnati. They had on board ten houses, ready framed for putting 
up, and were bound for the site where Junction City now is. We told 
them if they would join us and help build the town we would give them 
half the town-site ; the offer was accepted, and they remained and business 
became lively. The name of the town was changed from Boston to Man- 
hattan, as a clause in the constitution of the Cincinnati and Kansas Land 
Company required that the town where they settled should be called Man- 
hattan. This steamer on its return ran aground a short distance below 
Manhattan, and was burned by a prairie fire which swept over it. The 
bell, a fine-toned one, was saved, and given to the Methodist Church, it 
being the first one built. It has called the people together ever since, and 
may last several hundred years longer. 

The union of the two companies, of the East and of the West, produced 
a grand practical combination, the best kind of a business compound to 
make the right kind of a town to live in and to educate our children for 
citizenship and the responsibilities of life. Judge Pipher with his military 
airs, prompt action and commanding voice was just the man for our first 
Mayor, having been unanimously elected to this office. In all our contests 
with town-jumpers and border- ruffians, he had the tact to come out ahead 
and without any bloodshed. I shall never forget his grand charge on 
horseback, his hat off* his cloak flying far in advance of a line of thirty 
two men on a run to lynch or drive off" Isaac S. Haskell, one of the 
jumpers. The fellow had said that he would never leave, but would lay his 
bones there; but when he saw that body of determined men, swiftly 
approaching, his courage failed, and he ran at the top of his speed. The 
Mayor was all too glad to see him go, and to hasten him on, rode on. Jehu- 
like, and coming up to him, with stentorian voice cried out, " Run, run for 
your life, for I cannot answer for what my men may do!" And with the 
loss of one shoe, Haskell disappeared over Bluemont range. Really, we 
did not know then how we could have got along without the Judge. It is a 



Sixth Biexnial Report. 251 

singular fact in our Territorial history, that in all parts of Kansas we have 
had leaders raised up according to our necessities. I never could see how 
we could have succeeded in 1855-6-7, without Charles Robinson, Samuel 
C. Pomeroy, and James H. Lane. 

One of our settlers came the overland route with his team and family. 
For years he was noted for his long hair and whiskers. He had made a 
vow that they never should be cut till Kansas was a free State. He was 
like an old Whig whom we met in Dallas, Texas, in our Kansas editorial 
excursion to the Gulf in 1875. In the campaign of 1844 he had made a 
vow that he would neither shave nor use the shears till Henry Clay was 
elected President. He kept his vow. 

The first child born in the city was Irwin Lovejoy, now an honored 
graduate from Baker University and the Theological Department of Boston 
University. His parents. Rev. Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Lovejoy, occupied a log 
cabin near the Blue. I recollect dining there one day from a big fish. 
A line had been set the night before. A small fish of some five pounds 
had taken the hook, when this big fish of thirty pounds weight swallowed 
the little one, and both were hauled ashore. Mrs. Lovejoy was a good cook 
as well as a good controversialist, and our dinner was delicious. The 
first death was G. W. Barnes, a promising young man, son of Charles 
Barnes. Our first corn crop, planted on the 18th of June, sold at home 
for the Fort Riley market at $1.25 per bushel, and eggs 62^ cents per dozen. 

On the 4th of July we had pumpkin pies, but never have had them so early 
since ! On the town-site of Manhattan I could tie the prairie grass, blue- 
stem, over my head while sitting upon my pony. 

At first our supplies came from the river, 120 miles away. It required a 
journey of one or two weeks with horses or oxen. The first winter some of 
our settlers dried their corn in the oven and ground it in coffee mills; it 
made the best kind of bread. The arrival of the Emigrant Aid mill from 
Lawrence, drawn by twenty yoke of oxen, was a greater event to us than 
that of the Union Pacific Railroad eight years later. Wild turkeys, prairie 
chickens, quails, with rabbits, 'coons and possums, a few deer and wild-cats, 
and wolves now and then thrown in for a change, furnished a good variety 
of game. For winter meat a trip of 100 miles was taken out onto the plains 
for buffalo, which was all very good business so long as we kept clear of the 
warlike Cheyennes. The Kaw and Pottawatomie Indians, always ready 
for war in their hunting expeditions, usually kept the hostile Indians at a 
distance. 

In all the Kansas Free-State conventions Manhattan was well repre- 
sented, and her influence was felt in the right direction. At the first Free- 
State Convention at Lawrence, Aug. 14 and 15, 1855, Manhattan was 
represented by Dr. Amory Hunting, Rev. Joseph Denison, F. B. Neely, 
Wm. E. Goodnow, and Isaac T. Goodnow. P. C. Schuyler presided with 
distinguished ability, and gave universal satisfaction. In the large busi- 
—17 



252 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

ness committee, composed of some sixteen or twenty members, there was an 
unfortunate personal difficulty between Martin F. Conway and G. W. 
Smith, which for a time threatened disaster to the Free-State cause. Fi- 
nally, wise counsel prevailed, a personal explanation succeeded, and past 
differences were buried, and the meeting of two days proceeded with per- 
fect unanimity of feeling and measures. It was at this meeting that 
"Colonel" Lane, as he was then called, first made his debut. As a sup- 
porter of the Kansas-Nebraska bill in Congress, he was looked upon with 
suspicion by the members of the convention. Charles Foster, a young and 
eloquent lawyer from Boston, in a speech took special pains to rehearse his 
past history, not at all complimentary to Col. Lane. At its conclusion 
everybody expected a reply. But the Colonel not appearing, the chairman. 
Judge Schuyler, cried out with a strong voice which ought to have been 
heard a block away, " Where is the redoubtable Colonel ? " Still no " Colonel " 
appeared ! It was not long, however, before he offered a set of apt, pointed 
resolutions, which every member of the convention could not help voting 
for. From this to the end of the convention he was an efficient worker, and 
soon after represented Lawrence in the Big Springs convention, where he 
reported the first platform of Free-State principles for Kansas. But at no 
period in his subsequent career was his remarkable tact shown to greater 
advantage than at the Lawrence convention. At this time, also. General 
Poraeroy came before the convention, in a neat, well-prepared speech, in- 
terspersed with some beautiful, appropriate quotations of poetry, and which 
was delivered in a very agreeable manner. 

The New England Emigrant Aid Company undoubtedly saved Kansas 
from slavery. It organized emigration and furnished leaders of skill and 
courage that enabled the settlers to cope with the myrmidons of slavery. 
Lawrence was a creation of this company, and furnished a rallying-point 
from the various and widely scattered settlements. First and last it was the 
object of Border-Ruffian hate and attack. And she suffered more than all 
other towns put together. From each burning it. Phoenix-like, rose from 
its ashes stronger, and more beautiful than ever. While we admit that 
Pennsylvania, New York, and the West furnished a majority of the Free- 
State element, yet without Lawrence and such leaders as Gov. Robinson 
and General Pomeroy, brought here by the New England Emigrant Aid 
Company, what stand could have been made against the hordes of Geor- 
gians, South Carolinians, and the Blue Lodges of Missouri? It furnished 
the cohesive power that bound all in a mass, irresistible to the wiles and 
fierce attacks of the slave power. 

Never was a State settled from purer, nobler motives. In a private letter 
received not long since, Eli Thayer writes : " I feel a kinship nearer than 
that of blood for the heroic Kansas pioneers who responded to my call for 
volunteers for Kansas. They made the first self-sacrificing emigration in 
the world's history. All other emigrations have been either compulsory or 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 253 

self-seeking. Our Kansas Free-State men were as much above the Puritans 
as angels are above mortals." Eli Thayer, the honored founder of the New 
England Emigrant Aid Company, went over New England, preaching a 
crusade for the freedom of Kansas, like Peter the Hermit in his crusade for 
the recovery of the Holy Land. Kansas owes him a debt that she can 
never pay. A very fine marble bust of this noble educator and phihm- 
thropist can be seen in the rooms of our Historical Society. 

I have often thought, could I live over my Kansas life again, what 
changes I would make! We all have our fancies. There was not a town- 
site between this and the Missouri river that I fancied like our own, and 
not a claim in all the way for which I would exchange mine on the Wild 
Cat to live on. Our fellow-citizens, friends and neighbors, our churches and 
schools, all are first class, and from the first to the last I have never wished 
to change my location. Well can we say, "Our lots have fallen to us in 
pleasant places — we have a goodly heritage !" May the same contentment 
and appreciation attend the life of every Kansas emigrant. 



254 STATE Historical Society. 



ADDRESS OF EX-CHIEF JUSTICE SAMUEL A. KINGMAN. 



[Delivered at the annnal meeting of the State Historical Society, Jan. 17, 1888.] 

Assuming that others will deal this evening with the history of this Soci- 
ety and of the State, I propose to devote a few moments to the task of de- 
ducing from the past a few hints for the future. However much less 
interesting this course must be, it may not be without its value. 

Lord Bacon, in his classification of learning, assign^ to history everything 
that is related immediately to memory. So viewed, this paper is hardly 
within the scope of the objects of this Society. 

Hegel in his "Philosophy of History" gives a definition broad enough to 
cover what I have to say, and as others do, so do I, adopt that view that 
meets my own necessities. Hegel says : " History is the objective develop- 
ment of the divine idea of reason, whose essential characteristic is free- 
dom, and the condition of whose existence is to know itself, to become 
self-conscious." 

If this be true, then that people is worthy of historical place, knows its 
own deeds, w ill provide for them in advance, and prepare the necessary 
conditions and instrumentalities for the full and proper development of the 
welfare of society. 

Whether that is the case in our own State, is an inquiry that can hardly 
be foreign to the objects of this Society, which is the guardian of the his- 
toric character of the State. 

Recently a distinguished organ of Kansas, authorized by official position 
to voice the thought of her people, gave utterance to this expression : "Kan- 
sas progress, on the other hand, is continuous, permanent, and never-ending." 

That this is so, almost every man in Kansas will bear witness, especially 
land agents, town-builders, speculators, and railroads. What the rate of 
progress will be must be left to conjecture. "I know of no way of judging 
the future but by the past," was declared by the great orator of the Revo- 
lution, and with proper limitations and allowance for modifications of con- 
ditions, it seems a safe and prudent way. 

Let us take a glance into the future, thus lighted by the lamp of expe- 
rience. Since Kansas was admitted as a State she has doubled her population 
once in seven years. Now if this pace continues the child is now living who 
will see 26,252 millions people within the borders of our State, or about 
twenty-five times as many people as there are now. This would give a 
population of 500 to the square acre, leaving nothing for streets and alleys, 
graveyards or baseball grounds, making a population about as dense as that 
of Topeka with additions. 



r 



Sixth biexxial Repoiit. 255 

Do not be frightened by these figures. The result will never be realized, 
and if it should be you are not likely to be the child that will live to see it. 

But the possibilities startle one, and necessarily suggest the inquiry whether 
the sagacity and foresight of our people is equal to wisely providing for the 
needs of a population so rapidly increasing, and the mind necessarily turns 
in rapid succession from one point of view to another, and is apt to lose it- 
self in a maze of useless speculation or speculative uselessness. But let us 
(who are philosophical) examine the matter calmly, and to escape bewil- 
derment and keep within the fifteen minutes allotted, take up one topic. 

The force that acts most prominently and constantly in directing human 
affairs is the law. All other social forces, religious, commercial, or literary, 
and all ideas, arts, sciences and usages are easily considered as concentering 
in it. It is the resultant of the desires and needs of all the various classes 
of society, and the peculiar wants of each element of the State. It is the 
perfected tree whose welcome shade shelters all. 

It is a pertinent inquiry, then, to learn what provision is made for the 
formation of the rules that are to regulate the affairs of the coming hosts. 
And the answer Avill be satisfactory. When the people adopted the con- 
stitution they thought that fifty days each year was little enough to do the 
work of legislating, considering our few people and the simple manner of 
conducting affairs. Our traffic was small, and confined to the necessaries 
of life; transportation was in wagons. No great corporations had gathered 
to themselves vast aggregates of wealth, to bless or oppress the world. 

In their simplicity the founders of the State believed that fifty days each 
year was not more than enough time in which to make our laws. Later, 
with our increased knowledge and experience we cut the time down one- 
half, by providing for only biennial sessions, and making no provision for 
lengthening the session. Deducting the time taken to organize the Legisla- 
ture, name the committees, and Sundays, the sessions are less than forty 
days, or twenty days a year — about one-half of the time taken by the 
County Board of Shawnee to administer its affairs, and less than one-third 
of the days taken by the City Council of Topeka to regulate its affairs. 

And yet this twenty days must be considered enough, for did not the Leg- 
islature refuse to submit a proposition for a constitutional convention, deem- 
ing the same unnecessary ? It was the voice of the collective wisdom of the 
State, backed by experience and the advice of the board of trade — twenty 
days a year is enough. Such is the evolution of jurisprudence in Kansas, 
far exceeding in the capacity of its development, our increase in population 
and wealth. 

It is true that quite a number of the undeveloped members of the Legis- 
ture voted to submit the matter; but the majority, who know from expe- 
rience their own competency to provide at an hour's notice for the regulation 
of the affairs of an empire \vith its vast and complicated interests, social, 
moral and material, decided that there was all the time necessary : and who 
dares dispute their wisdom ? 



256 State Historical Society. 

The conviction must have been strong, for there were minor questions 
pressing for consideration and amendment, such as the fact that the imme- 
diate prospect that our Legislature, under the present constitution, would 
soon represent areas and not humanity, acres and not men. Experience, 
logic and common sense must all yield to illuminated minds. 

Indeeed, he who questions legislative wisdom may be characterized as 
Mr. Bumble did the law. The only doubt is whether the coming hosts of 
Kansas will have the good fortune to have the benefit of so much genius to 
regulate its immense affairs. 



Sixth biennial repobt. 257 



ORIGIN OF KANSAS NAMES.- FOREIGN SETTLEMENTS. 



[A paper read at the annual meeting of the Kansas State Historical Society, Janu- 
ary 17, 1888, by Prof. W. H. Carruth, of the Kansas State University.] 

My invitation to speak here is of so recent a date that I have had no 
time to make any historical research, and you can easily see that I could 
have no personal acquaintance with the ancient history of the State. How- 
ever, I am very glad to make use of my opportunity by telling you some of 
the things I want to know, which perchance some of you know, wholly or 
in part, and, if such be not the case, of begging your assistance in getting 
answers to my own questions. 

It would be a matter of interest, if not of importance, to know the mean- 
ing and origin of all the geographical names in our State. Moreover, it is 
quite probable that the research would bring to light not a few historical 
matters of interest, while the curiosity of children about these names might 
not infrequently become a means of teaching a lessen in local history. To 
take a few instances : Who would know" in later time whether Humboldt was 
named by settlers from some other town of the same name, or by American 
admirers of the great naturalist, or by a colony of his countrymen? The 
last is the fact. Or that the neighboring town of lola was named after the 
wife of one of its founders? The name of the county, Allen, came I know 
not whence. There are doubtless children not a few who suppose that Wy- 
andotte originated in the convenient trigraph Y&., or others, even the 
proud capital itself, who do not know that Topeka is Indian for "Small Po- 
tatoes." 

The newspapers of the State could easily collect this information, and I 
trust they may be moved to do so. 

Another and more important matter which I commend to the attention 
of this society is the charting of the foreign settlements in the State. We 
have represented within our borders nearly every European language and 
even dialect, with all the corresponding peculiarities and varieties of man- 
ners and character. As time goes on it will become ever more important 
for the language student and the historian to know the original home and 
the strength and limits of these settlements. Sometimes new words will 
work their way into our language -through these channels, and future schol- 
ars will be saved many a long research by knowing the original dialects of 
all the elements of our population. I think I have already discovered a few 
beginnings of such new growths in our language. The same thing will be 
true in regard to customs and costumes that will be found among us some 
day, apparently isolated and inexplicable. But just as the botanist, finding 



258 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

a plant somewhere on the Kansas plains far away from its kindred, learns 
by inquiry of the annals of the county, that hereabouts settled a colony 
from New York, or Michigan, who probably brought the seed with them in 
the mud dried upon the wagon-bed, so will students of these slower yet 
no less natural growths, language and manners, be enabled, by a little 
trouble on our part in recording the facts of to-day, to trace the genesis of 
many an otherwise puzzling phenomenon. I suppose the simplest way of 
securing this information is through the census-takers, and I trust that Ma- 
jor Sims, or his successor, will see the desirability of including this among 
the very valuable charts of the Reports of the State Board of Agriculture. 



Sixth Biexxial Report. 259 



THE PIONEER PRESS OF KA.NSAS. 



[At the annual meeting of the Society, January 17, 1888, Charles F. Scott, editor 
of the lola (Kansas) Register read the following paper :] 

It is probably not a violent presumption that all the world is reasonably 
well apprised of the fact that Kansas has gained considerably in population 
and wealth during the past quarter of a century. At any rate, all the world 
may know it if it cares to be informed. For the fact has been announced 
several times. Visitors sojourning here for a season have returned home 
and told about it. The land-grant railroads have alluded to it occasionally 
in their advertisements. And even Kansas people, in the seclusion of 
family gatherings similar to this, have sometimes modestly called attention 
to the encouraging figures. But while the fact of our rapid and substantial 
development is known and admitted, it may not be difficult to understand 
why some of our Eastern friends, who have never visited us, may find it 
hard to see the reason for it. Having never felt any inclination themselves 
to come to a State that was first bleeding, and then drouthy, and then de- 
voured of grasshoppers, they do not understand why anybody else should 
have such inclination. They doubtless find themselves in much the same 
predicament as was Bill Nye in attempting to account for the proneness of 
people to visit the grave of a man who, according to Mr. Ignatius Donnelly, 
was a drunken, lowbred, illiterate loafer. Mr. Nye finally concluded that 
Shakespeare was lucky in getting himself buried at a place to which people 
just naturally flocked; and our puzzled Eastern friends may explain to 
themselves in a similar way the development of Kansas. Those who are 
better informed, however, who have the ''sensible and true avouch" of 
their own eyes to aid their judgment, have experienced no such diffi- 
culty in finding a reason. They have found it in the beauty of a Kansas 
landscape, in the salubrity of our climate, in the fertility of her soil, in the 
variety, extent and distribution of her mineral resources, and in countless 
other material attractions. The agents and assistants of this development 
have been recognized also, and, in the main, have been generously awarded 
their due meed of honor and praise. The railroads reaching out into the 
unknown, leading rather than following immigration; our educational 
system, furnishing without price the means of every degree of culture, 
from the primary school to the university; our enlightened and liberal 
laws — all these have been given a large share of credit in bringing about 
an advancement that the world has seldom witnessed. But of all the 
agencies, individual or corporate, animate and material, that have labored 
to achieve this devoutly wished consummation, there is one that even yet 



260 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

awaits adequate recognition, although without it all these others would 
have labored in vain. And that is the pioneer press of Kansas. And by 
pioneer, I mean not only that of the fifties and early sixties, but that also 
which has accompanied and kept pace with the very utmost wave of the 
tide of immigration as it gradually crept from the eastern border to the 
western plains. While exhausting the vocabulary of praise in applauding 
the work that others have done for Kansas, these men have refrained, with 
a modesty and diffidence characteristic of their profession, from calling 
attention to their own labors, and nobody else ever seemed to think about 
it. It would seem that this august Society, whose peculiar province it is 
to note, not only the growth of Kansas, but the manner of that growth 
and all the elements and agencies of it, might most fittingly supply this 
unaccountable omission. Your present talker hopes that he may venture 
to call attention to it, without incurring the odium that usually attaches to 
a solo performance upon one's personal trumpet; for although himself an 
humble member of the craft, he did not come upon the field until every way 
had been made straight. It is the labor, often unrequited, but always 
faithfully and cheerfully done, of those who made these ways straight, that 
Kansas should hold in loving and grateful remembrance. For the news- 
paper men of Kansas, as has been well said, were her first and bravest 
pioneers. From the elm tree on the banks of the Missouri, from under 
whose grateful shadow fluttered forth the first printed sheet more than a 
generation ago, to the sand-hills and ravines of Thomas county, from which 
the latest venture has just reached us, they have led, step by step, the 
peaceful army that has conquered the waste places. Wherever two or 
three stores and a blacksmith shop were gathered together, there was the 
newspaper man with his little "print shop," in the midst of them. And he 
was there "to stay," as he generally took pains to announce. He was there 
to say that his town was the town of the county; that its site was the finest, 
its water the purest, and its business men the most enterprising and ener- 
getic. He was there to make outsiders feel that life spent anywhere else 
was worse than wasted. He was there to urge and scourge the citizens into 
prospecting for coal and gas and salt, into offering inducements to railroads, 
into going out and compelling manufacturing enterprises to come in and 
locate. He was there to prophesy a boom, and to see to it that the 
prophecy was fulfilled. Infinitely fertile in schemes and suggestions, one 
plan was no sooner realized or proven futile than another was proposed. 
Always resolute, energetic, hopeful, no disappointment could cool his ardor 
or weaken his faith. No matter if the railroad did go to the rival town ; 
it was only a "jerk-water" any way, and the trunk line would be along 
presently. No matter if the factory did fail to materialize, a larger one 
was always in sight. His courage and cheerfulness survived even the dis- 
aster of a county -seat fight, giving him a chance, like another Mark 
Tapiey, to " come out strong." 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 261 

It is not within the scope of these brief remarks to "name names" or to 
give individual instances. In general, however, the picture thus hastily 
drawn shadows forth the main outlines in the experience of all our pioneer 
newspaper men. In the plain United States language that they themselves 
used, they had started out to stay by their town, and they did it with daunt- 
less courage, with tireless persistency, and with self- forgetting singleness of 
purpose. 

And all the time they were doing this they did not forget Kansas. 
Whatever they may have said concerning some rival town, for the State at 
large they had only words of pride and praise and love. Away back in 
the fifties, while she was still a prey to slavery and border-ruffianism, they 
proclaimed that she must and should be free forevermore — and some of 
them sealed the proclamation with their blood. While two-thirds of her 
territory was still branded on all the maps as a sandy desert, her editors 
made weekly affidavit that there were roses on every hillside. Any dis- 
paraging remark about her was resented as a personal affront. Any 
attempt of an injudicious outsider to point out a defect in Kansas was 
instantly buried a hundred fathoms deep under scores of newspapers loaded 
with defiant denials of every allegation. Through famine and pestilence 
and war, through chinch-bugs and grasshoppers and drouth, their courage 
never faltered, their zeal never flagged, their faith never doubted. The 
darker it grew, the more vociferously they proclaimed that the dawn was 
just at hand. All the long summer and late into the fall, they called the 
world to come and bear witness to our Italian climate; and when, along in 
December, the mercury suddenly dropped out of the thermometer they 
promptly denied the absurd rumors that people had been frozen to death, 
and triumphantly proclaimed that it was twice as cold everywhere else. 
They were fond of comparing her people, her politics, her morals, her 
churches and schools, her soil and crops, with those of other States; and 
they always saw to it that the comparison was favorable to Kansas. 

All of these things they did, not because they were paid to do them, but 
because they loved to do them. And when the story of Kansas is told, let 
not the labors of these men be forgotten. They may not have created 
Kansas exactly, but they breathed into her nostrils the breath of life. 
They found her bleeding, barren and prostrate, and they have endured all 
difficulties that she might be lifted, blooming and triumphant, to the 
shining stars. 



262 STATE Historical Society. 



COLONIZATION OF THE UPPER ARKANSAS VALLEY IN 

KANSAS. 



[The following paper was read by Hon. H. N. Lester, of Syracuse, Kansas, at 
the annual meeting, January 17, 1888:] 

Mr. President, Ladies and Oentlemen: Fifteen minutes may be too short 
a time for the gentleman who preceded me, to express himself upon this 
occasion, but, it is more than ample for me, and if my card of invitation 
had read sixteen, instead, it is very doubtful if you would have had the 
pleasure of forming my acquaintance to-night. For I credit myself with 
more good sense than to attempt any lengthy display of frontier elo- 
quence before so refined and cultured an audience as faces me to-night. 
And as you do not expect much from me upon any subject, so you will not 
expect me to recite the history of the olden times, nor to repeat the story 
of those days, when the eastern portion of our State was the theater of a 
struggle which resulted in making Kansas free, and was indeed the Con- 
cord and Lexington that ushered in the mightier conflict that terminated 
in the enfranchisement of a race, and the ire of whose heat melted a "glit- 
tering generality" into a solid ingot of "eternal truth." Among you sit 
to-night, men who were active participants in those stirring times, whose 
presence is more eloquent than speech of mine, and whose monument is in 
the records sheltered beneath this roof, to teach coming generations the 
knowledge of their sacrifice and the glory of their accomplishments. 
Therefore I shall speak to you of that portion of the State with which I 
am more familiar, and which is now designated as western Kansas. And 
as one Kansas county is about all my intellectual powers are able to 
grapple with in one encounter, I shall confine myself to that of Hamilton, 
where I have now resided nearly fifteen years, and which is indeed a fair 
prototype of them all, in configuration, soil, climate, and settlement. 

Hamilton is one of the extreme western counties, and borders on the 
State of Colorado. Nearly through its center the sinuous Arkansas winds 
its course, the great water-way over which the founder of the salty city of 
Hutchinson transported cotton from New Orleans in ocean steamers, when 
he was about the only inhabitant of that now thriving and populous town. 
At least the maps and pamphlets sent broadcast over the land in 1872 by 
this enterprising Kansan presented the alluring spectacle of puffing steam- 
ers, and wharves piled high with the fleecy product of the South. And 
although in the light of experience we are led to doubt, at any time, the 
existence of Hutchinson's "merchant marine," we have actual knowledge 
that the river, at least, is a reality, and runs from the mountains to the 



Sixth Biexnial Report. 263 

sea, roaring full in the summer-time, and laying by for repairs in the win- 
ter, when Dakota blizzards make traveling unsafe. 

The first settlement of this county was made at Syracuse, (then Holli- 
daysburg,) in the spring of 1873, by a colony recruited in and about 
Syracuse, N. Y., by Mr. E. P. Barber. A more incongruous, motley body 
of men and women were surely never gathered together since the time when 
Captain Noah sailed the Ark over mountain and valley, and the waters cov- 
ered the face of the earth. Neither were they much wiser than Noah as to 
where they were going, or what they would do when they got there. Really, 
they did not expect to do much of anything. They had somehow formed 
the idea that in this favored land they would find the paradise of agricul- 
ture, where wheat and corn, potatoes and oranges were produced by a sort 
of "spontaneous combustion," and neither they nor their descendants need 
to "toil or spin." 

To be more serious, yet not more truthful, they came to farm, and to 
build up a pastoral community. And being mostly composed of various 
trades and professions, they brought a farmer along to show them how to 
make " bricks without straw," or rather, raise crops w^ithout water. They 
had other ideas than this, however, and one of them was to possess the 
whole county, change the name from Hamilton to Onondaga, Hollidays- 
burg to Syracuse, and make it the county seat. They changed the name of 
the town, but so far it has not been definitely and unalterably settled whether 
or not it is the county seat. In June another detachment arrived, of which 
I was one. We were four days on the road from Atchison, before we 
reached the Mecca of our hopes — and such a one as we had never dreamed 
of. Prairie land as far as we could see, bare and brown as a well-roasted 
turkey. No rain had fallen for more than six weeks, and it seemed to me 
as I gazed around that I stood in the exact geographical center of desola- 
tion. A few days after, however, the clouds gathered, the flood-gates of 
the heavens opened, and the water came down in sheets. Vegetation re- 
vived, gardens flourished, and the hearts of the people were glad. 

The next season the drouth came on again, Indian scares were prevalent, 
the " tinkers and tailors, blacksmiths and sailors," could not get the hang of 
the thing, and the gloom of despondency hung over us. In this emergency, 
a Mr. Kelsey, who lived at Hutchinson, and who filled the position of For- 
ester (whatever that might mean in a country where there were no forests) 
for the Santa Fe, came down to speak words of encouragement to us. He 
was a good talker, and, gathering our people together, proceeded to make 
us a speech, which evidently had a good eflfect, until he happened to say in 
speaking of what they had grown at Hutchinson, that they had raised 
muskmelons that weighed forty pounds ; when an old fellow by the name 
of Morris jumped up and said : " Muskmelons that weighed forty pounds ! 
— that's nothing; I've raised them in California that one seed weighed forty 
pounds." The assertion fairly astounded Kelsey ; it seemed to break the 



264 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

backbone of his argument, aud although he tried to rally, the recoil was 
too great. His speech ended there — and his influence. 

But I must not attempt to give the history of that colony in detail, for, 
if I had the ability to put it in shape I could fill a book. It is enough 
for me to say here, that drouths and grasshoppers, blizzards, Indians, and 
prairie fires, discouraged the people, and by help of the railroad company 
they moved to different parts of Kansas, all but four families, who are in 
Syracuse now ; and the farmer I mentioned went to Missouri, thence to 
Texas, into Arkansas, and the last heard of him was, that he was still on 
the wing. 

For many years since then the country has slept in its original solitude, 
inhabited only by stock-men, who used their best endeavors to keep settlers 
out, while the railroad company, fighting shy of detached settlements, 
adopted the wiser plan of pushing on the immigration in a solid body; and 
not until a few years ago did the head of its column dare to cross the 
imaginary line at Dodge City, that in the minds of men marked the divi- 
sion of the fertile from the sterile lands. Dodge City, Cimmaron and 
Garden City grew up, and the lines pushed on into Hamilton county. To- 
day it numbers some 7,000 or 8,000 inhabitants. Syracuse, Coolidge and 
Kendall are prosperous towns, aud but for the blight that has rested upon 
it since its organization, "the primal, eldest curse" of all the new counties 
of the State, more to be dreaded than blizzard, or hot simoom, drouth, 
grasshoppers, and Indian raids — a Kansas county- seat contest, we should 
now have double the present number of inhabitants. For more than two 
years now we have lived under its baneful influence, under a dual govern- 
ment — one at Syracuse and another at Kendall, and a part of one at 
Coolidge at different intervals. A portion of the records is in each town. 
A county treasurer at Syracuse, one at Coolidge, and a deputy at Kendall ; 
two probate judges, marrying and giving in marriage. Altogether we are 
in a state of chaos; our indebtedness piled mountain high, and increasing 
daily. I sometimes wonder how we exist at all. It is indeed a state of 
affairs ruinous to all public interests, destructive of all business occupa- 
tions, an obstacle to progress, and a bar to all development of our great 
natural resources. Is it strange our people cry out for relief, and implore 
the august tribunal, in whose power it is to lift the incubus that weighs 
us down, to drive away the bird of evil omen that preys upon the sub- 
stance of the land, to "Take its beak from out our hearts, and take its 
form from off* our door," that we may open wide the portals to the multi- 
tudes moving ever westward, and even now clamoring for admittance. 
Then indeed might our people rejoice, singing the glad song of Miriam: 

"Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea — 
Jehovah has triumphed, His people are free." 

For then peace would dwell in the place of contention, plenty smile where 
poverty frowns, and glad prosperity trail her golden garments over a land as 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 265 

fair and fertile as smiles in the light of the shining sun. Then, and not until 
then, can we become of some good to ourselves, of some service to our 
neighbors, and of credit to the great State of which we are so profoundly 
proud; a State whose history is all heroic, whose marvelous growth is the 
astonishment of the world, and whose name is familiarly spoken in all the 
languages of men. God grant that the day may come, and quickly, when 
with burden lifted, and fetters broken, our oppressed may all go free. 



266 State Historical Society, 



KANSAS HISTORY. 



Minutely Written and Well Preserved by tlie Kansas Editors. 



[Hon. J. Ware Butterfield's address before the State Historical Society, at the 
annual meeting, January 17, 1888.] 

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: I can but express my gratitude at 
being able to be present this evening, and will detain you for a few 
moments only with what I have to say relative to the Kansas Historical 
Society. 

To the members of the press the State of Kansas is under lasting ob- 
ligations; for the press never did a better thing for Kansas than the 
founding of this Society. Probably of the two millions of inhabitants 
of Kansas to-day but few are aware that this Society was conceived and 
organized by a few members of the press. A resolution was passed by an 
editorial convention, called in the year 1875, declaring in favor of the 
establishment of a State Historical Society, the object of which should be 
that of "saving the present and past records of our twenty-one years of 
ev^entful history." This Society was organized in 1875. From its age and 
resources but little might have been expected, and yet of its "twenty-one 
years of eventful history," the records of which occupy so much space in 
the great capitol of Kansas, the half has not been told. 

Great as is the State, marvelous as has been its growth and development, 
the second quarter r f a century of its life will, when its end approaches, 
show a greater and more glorious triumph. True, slavery was excluded 
from Kansas soil, and deeds of valor made Kansas a free State; later on 
she gave of her blood and treasure to preserve the Union and put down the 
Kebellion. Kansas was born amid turmoil, plots and bloodshed, and it 
took nearly one-quarter of a century to re-create it upon a peace footing. 
So far as men were concerned, no State was better prepared for war than 
was Kansas during the border troubles and its subsequent period of war — 
men everywhere — few boys and fewer women, but everywhere men; and 
as men they conducted themselves to the end. 

The Rebellion over, peace was almost as great a trial to their manhood as 
was war. A great State — 400 by 200 miles — was to be settled, plowed, 
and planted ; and civil authority, pushing aside military law, was to create 
and educate a race of Kansans. Right nobly has it all been done. The 
men and women who came to Kansas during its struggle for freedom and 
aided in attaining these victories, were ready to push onward the car of 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 267 

progress and light anew the beacon of civilization. Kansas stands to-day 
with the eyes of the whole world focused upon her, noting the results of 
her efforts for temj^erance and justice. 

Prohibition — law and order sustained — municipal suffrage for women — 
these are the results, these the legacies left to children born on Kansas 
soil. It is the unwritten history of Kansas, history not yet made, that is 
to decide whether these are to succeed or fail. Why should not the children 
of such fathers and mothers be equal to the occasion and keep the banner 
of Kansas in the front rank ? If left to them, there would be no doubt ; 
but will it be left to them ? Oh no ! The thousands of immigrants who 
have yearly come from the Old World, rearing children that are soon, some 
very soon, to take an active part in the making of the law, how will they 
act on these vital questions ? Anarchy and insubordination, the outgrowth 
of tyranny and oppression in the Old World, have shown themselves in 
America during the past few years with fatal effect. In Kansas they can- 
not thrive. If we sustain the past history of Kansas, our very laws would 
throttle it. But the germ should be killed — killed by education and con- 
tact with our advanced civilization. 

For one I am not afraid of foreign immigration ; on the contrary, it is to 
that immigration, restricted by wholesome laws, shutting out thieves, felons, 
and paupers (but not the poor simply on account of their poverty) — to the 
new blood coming from every clime, that will marry and intermarry with 
Americans, Irish and German-Americans, that I look for the strongest sup- 
port of our Government. Our danger lies only in the non- enforcement of 
our laws. 

But to return to matters of this Society : I have examined the history 
and workings of a great many historical societies in the United States, but 
I find only one that bears any comparison to our own, or rather with which 
any just comparison can be made. That is the Wisconsin Historical Soci- 
ety. It is thirty-five years old, and the State appropriates to it annually 
$10,060, viz.: 

Library $5,000 GO 

Salary of secretary 1,200 00 

Librarian 2,000 00 

Assistant librarian 920 00 

Janitor 500 00 

This Society is the pride of the Wisconsin people, and well it may be. 
Kansas has taken its idea from Wisconsin, not as old, not as large, but 
doing equally as good work ; and to say that, is sufficient praise of our own 
institution. I shall not speak of ^ny of its actual requirements and neces- 
sities. It^ officers will do that, and the State will cheerfully respond to 
their requests. 

Michigan gives $500 a year to a pioneer society. Iowa gives $1,000 a 
year to a State Historical Library in connection with the State University. 
Minnesota gives $2,500 a year to her Society, and the Society has a perma- 
—18 



268 STATE HiSTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

nent fund that yields an income of $1,200 annually. Nebraska, New Hamp- 
shire and Vermont all give small amounts to their historical societies. 

The State of Kansas has during the past six years appropriated for the 
State Historical Society the following sums annually : 

Legislature of 1883 $2,550 00 

Legislature of 1885 3,350 00 

Special session of 1886, a special donation 1,000 00 

Lejfislature of 1887 4,240 00 

Which makes an average appropriation for the past six years of $3,516.66 
per year. 

The annual reports of the Kansas Historical Society and its quarter- 
centennial volume are valuable, and will be regarded years hence as perfect 
treasures of history. 

I have one thought that I would like you to consider, even after you 
leave this hall: Seed sown on fertile soil is a test of the quality of the seed. 
If this suggestion is worthless or impracticable, it will not root; if it is good 
seed, let it be cultivated. Kansas is always liberal, but in some things she 
would not suffer by more liberality. Truth eliminated from fiction should 
be the garment woven by the State. The warp and woof should be the 
truth. Fiction, not fact, will surely be woven into the history of our State 
unless the proper steps are taken to preserve the facts as they happen day 
by day. Why should not the State of Kansas have a Kansas Annual, pub- 
lished by the State Historical Society ? It would be of no great expense to 
the State, and would be of great service and profit. It should contain in 
addition to the report of the Society, a summary of Kansas for the year, 
touching concisely on the political, educational, legislative, and judicial his- 
tory ; reminiscences of actors in the border struggle and civil war. Every 
fact would be an ingot invaluable to the future historian of our State. Give 
an account of discoveries, such as coal, gas, and salt; speak of inventions, 
such as sugar refining; State institutions, such as reformatories, asylums, 
silk industry and stations, and other experimental industries. And equally 
important would be an authoritative history of the various Indian tribes that 
so lately occupied and roamed at will over our broad prairies. This is 
meant, not for an advertisement of the State, but simply to preserve the facts, 
both failures and successes. To-day we are discovering new coal fields, one 
of the real necessities of Kansas. It has been developed that Kansas can 
feed her own and neighboring States; can supply salt enough to make 
another ocean ; sugar enough to sweeten the world; and silk — well, sufli- 
cient for a dress pattern for the estimable wife of our honored Governor. 



Sixth biennial Re post. 269 



KANSAS. 

Her Historj^, Her History-Makers, and Her Historical Society. 



[An address by C. Borin, editor of the Oberlin Eye, before the State Historical So- 
ciety, January 17, 1888.] 

Since Coronado was led by the savage guide across the treeless plains 
now touched into living beauty by Kansas husbandry, Kansas has awakened 
an interest in the civilized world ; since Jefferson, repudiating the tenets of 
his party against extension of territory, broke party faith to gain an empire 
in the Louisiana Purchase, Kansas, a most important portion of that ter- 
ritory, has held the attention of intelligent minds in all countries of the 
earth. Through the exciting times of the Missouri Compromise, the Free- 
Soilers, the Kansas-Nebraska bill, the raid and the execution of John 
Brown, and the awful civil war thus precipitated, down to constitutional 
prohibition, municipal suffrage for women, and the Murray law, Kansas has 
been a subject of comment throughout this country and Europe, and Kan- 
sas men and formerly-of-Kansas men and their sayings and doings have 
been "cussed" and discussed by papers and people throughout the world. 

Geographically central in the nation and the inhabitable portion of the 
North- American continent, our fair young commonwealth is historically the 
central figure of the nation — aye, of the nations of the earth, and as they 
watch with bated breath and wondering eye her marvelous development 
they ask with Solomon, "Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness?" 
And as they behold her boundless prairies; wrested from the Great Ameri- 
can Desert of Mitchell's map by the energy of the sturdy, home-making, 
home-beautifying, home-loving Anglo-Saxon race ; converted into broad pro- 
ductive fields and rich pastures ; dotted with orchards, groves and farmers' 
homes; covered o'er with cities, towns and villages; threaded by streams, 
that wind about like curves of living silver, ministering to the thirsty earth 
and its burden of vegetable and animal life with their wealth of liquid crys- 
tal ; banded by mile upon mile of burnished steel in those mighty arteries 
of commerce, the railroads; veiled with the living lace of numberless tele- 
graph, telephone and electric-light wires ; as they look upon the cattle on a 
thousand hills ; as they see the gleaming gold of her wonderful stores of 
grain — gold and precious treasures for which Coronado sought in vain — as 
they observe the marvelous mineral wealth brought to light by Kansas 
push, pick and powder, they are further led to exclaim in the context to 
Solomon's question, "leaning upon her Beloved?" 



BUO SniKTE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

But though dealing to some extent with the material resources of Kansas 
as developed by Kansas brawn, the history of this favored daughter of prog- 
ress has chiefly to do with 

KANSAS BRAIN. 

Abler tongues than mine have praised these pioneer history-makers — 
Governor Reeder, Rev. Jothara Meeker, John Brown, James H. Lane, and 
the yast^and varied constellations to which each belongs and which shine so 
brightly in the broad firmament of Kansas history; mine be the humbler 
task of mentioning other classes of the beloved upon whom Kansas has so 
xjonfidentiy .leaned witlw^ut<betrayal as she has come up out of the wilderness 
on her course to the stars. 

-;i,ij^rst4n the li^)t;L<pia^ those much-abused men, who have been reviled 
jandwho hatV^ revUe^ agalijn, who have been called by every opprobrious name 
'in -the glossary Qf;TOa|iee. -and contumely, and who have given back in full 
jipne^SMje,; . I ;f^fer X^i ^Ihe r: >,■ 

-r.J iKiil -to iU^in^ni lHX:nr.I^EAL-ESTATE AGENTS. 

,: The ^ Kansas of t^-d,$,y;i is largely indebted to them for what she is. 
•Iiftrge-l>xaiiiedjclearreyQ(J[^ strong to plan and to do, possessed of keen judg- 
[me4t, a \yeli-etprje4 jflin^uand a ready tongue, the Kansas land agent is 
Isure^ly :<)^^ of the Mpte^- The Missouri land man paints fences, barns 
^flid-QuthOMses.onjth'eiJvOa^B. leading to his village; the Kansas man takes a 
-fuJl^p^gP; adverti|e|iaest/ ii^ his local paper, a column or. two of reading 
jiofcicesj and' orders- a; tHQiis^nd extra copies, sending them broadcast through 
the East. iThe dealer ri^i realty in Iowa sells a farm and makes a hundred 
dftllars; , the, jKan*ft$(jift$^: surveys and plats a town on the farm, gives a lot 
JiO; thiQ; j)Wa^-'Wh0::>(Ui//l?Mild on it, builds school houses, churches, public 
w0rks^;S$qnre9tr8-ilrQftdi,facilities, and there is a Horton with her four thou- 
]8aOfll ; pleopfe Ui,^ev?ftit?e^j months, or a Wichita, the windy wonder of the 
Wj^tri jHieylii^s?; JPterjhjaps, But the noblest liar of them all hangs his 
-he«4/iPi.-sibJiniei']inaaifejVV;jshort years — mayhap mouths — the lies he told 
,ar!e^ifar,below;,th,^^tr^th Kansas progress makes possible. 
-.,;,B|LifcJi,an;%ifio;tiJiie^et;it9 pronounce eulogies upon the land agent. Next I 
■pilWftjj'l hrii; i^'K/i^ A>'\P.{\ . 
..auml. M i.,b;.,Mt -,:,/- JOURNALISTS. 

HiiMo4pfti?yfifi?(irlpid^:;i|iiy.,4yvelling upon the work these devoted men and 
.JiW)[ip^l>,jljifli've 4(>fl§ itP^P?!?^ the upbuilding of Kansas. I could exhaust my 
-l^iBftJier^ )>yi the projpg.ijip ;tp, this fruitful theme. I but point you to the hon- 
-Qj^ajble, .presiding-, offip^,_,t'he veteran secretary of this association, Col. An- 
/jtlw>ny>]QiQv^,M%rt^i[^, pJdiSpl. Miller, Noble Prentis, and a host of others, all 
'thoii^rQl?l^;jiK|Q|:^^!b«aifipg'jth? scars of battle and some wearing the crowns of 
>ft-ha«^y-H?iOfl(>yiicitp^j54.(j,'JJhey, from their past experiences, hard trials and 
-5gJ!Q*t'ItrJ^uijjjli^s,jCQHl(^,"a tale unfold that would harrow up your souls 
cftq^^f^kp^ftc5iip^|ii<f<^i%r,lmir to stand on end, like quills upon the fretful 
porcupine." All honor to 'these brothers of the press, who have, through 



Sixth Biennial Repobt, ' 271 

devious paths, dread dangers and dark difficulties, sounded the praises of 
Kansas till she shines among the stars. 

THE TEACHERS, 

too, I must leave to others words of praise, les^t^/l * laiiid my own calling. 
Suffice it to say that from the first brave half-dozen to the thousands who 
now meet yearly in this audience-room, from McCarty, of revered memory, 
to my good friend the " canny Scot," full of practical good-sense and quaint 
humor, who in this populous county of Shawne%rules the teachers with a 
tongue of caustic power, the teachers have been no mean factor in the up- 
building of this commonwealth. , . . 

STATESMEN, 

I need only mention in passing. Kansans are all statesme^i.and.Foyrth of 
Ju-liars, and rank anywhere, from Ingalls and plumb on the one hand,, to 
the original of Mark Twain's "Col. Sellers" on the other. _ ,, 

Preachers, from the pioneer Dr. Fisher to the brother in one of our grow- 
ing cities, who, catching the boom fever, startled, Ijimself and hig congrega- 
tion one Sunday morning by announcing as his text "the second addition 
to John : lot 3, block 5," have materially aided in the grand work of up- 
building the State. ., 

Scientists, lawyers, authors, poets, all have add^d, their quota in making 
up the full measure of Kansas history, and , . ,, ,.. i , , , ; ,,, . 

THE STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

is the omnium gatherum, securing from all these history- makers the mate^ 
rial for the history of the State, restoring mutilated books, arranging and 
preserving articles of historic value, filing and binding current history in 
the daily and weekly newspapers of the State, searching out and securing ev- 
erything possible that will make our history complete, and making such dis- 
position of it that it is easy of access to anyone who seeks its treasures, any 
student of history who chooses to avail himself of its vast stores of knowl- 
edge. 

When we consider the power the history of a State is for good to its peo- 
ple, when we remember the love of country it engenders, when we under- 
stand the incentive it is to the youth, the counselto the statesman, when we 
apprehend the courage it imparts to the struggling ones, when 'we realize 
the comfort it affords those who are, after an active; life^ watebiiig- the re- 
sults of their labor, we may be able to appreciate the value of this Sdciety, 
and the necessity of providing, in increased room,' mare liberal appropria- 
tions and more cordial and earnest support, the means for its greatly enlarged 
usefulness. ■' -'^ '^:fi- ■yuv]-' ^-fi; <■: ^n;;..- // 

Long live the Kansas Historical Society, and may she ever enlarge -he^ 
borders! '/^ ^'^uL ni-jofl b/ioj'ii muO 

■ ;' iliv/ bHbiiR^ ?'iJ!e7 yvrt tzoa 



272 Statu Histobical Society. 



PIONEERS OF KANSAS. 



[Address of Hon. Jas. F. Legate before the Kansas Historical Society, at the annual 
meeting, January 17, 1888.] 

Ladies and Gentlemen: When I received a brief notice on yesterday 
morning from my friend here, President Wilder, telling me that I would be 
expected to make a fifteen-minutes talk in this hall this evening, I did not 
know what to talk about. I do not know now what to say. I have noth- 
ing to talk about. When I came to Topeka I called upon the President 
and begged that I might be excused, but my pleadings were in vain. I 
then implored him to call upon me after the others had spoken and after 
the audience had thinned out, hoping that by that time there would be no 
audience to talk to and I would be relieved from making a talk at all this 
evening. 

There is a little personal pride that prompts men to make history for 
themselves by making written speeches at these Society meetings. How fu- 
tile ! He who cares most for the history of others, whose history is worth 
caring for, will be best remembered when the pen of the real historian shall 
note our deeds and chronicle the events of those days. 

It is very pleasant for us to come here and travel backward to 1854. Af- 
ter that time — between 1854, when I first landed in Kansas, until 1888 — 
if I, or anyone, had foretold the events that would transpire in that inter- 
vening period, I should have been denounced as a fool or a lunatic, though 
I had not told half the truth. That period is crowded with such 
remarkable events, with such remarkable scenes, and with remarkable men 
and women, that no man, however wise, or however eloquent, can recall 
them in a single night, or in a single week, or in a single month. And no 
man who now lives, or has ever lived, has meted out half justice to either. 
Nor need we now, as my friend who preceded me, refer to the original Col. 
Sellers. If he had lived here and known Samuel C. Pomeroy, to whom he 
doubtless refers, with all his faults, he would have known one of the best 
men Kansas ever had ; one of her best friends ; and one to whom the State 
is under more obligation than to any other man. And the method of 
his taking-off was such a disgrace left upon the State and every man and 
woman in the State that it will last as a shame while the history of Kansas 
lasts. 

Our friend Borin does well to mention female municipal suffrage as one 
of the glories of Kansas. Let me here make a prophecy — that within the 
next five years Kansas will have more than 2,500,000 people, and that the 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 273 

women of the State will have the same right to vote and hold office that men 
now enjoy. 

The women of Kansas have earned it by their chivalric deeds in war, 
and by their matchless deeds in peace, aidiug to subdue the wild wastes of 
Kansas, transforming the home of the wild red man, the wild buffalo and 
the prowling wolf into happy Christian homes for the highest civilization on 
the face of the earth. 

To attempt to recall the history of all the men and women of Kansas is 
futile. Robinson, Lane and John Brown are the three prominent lights of 
the past. For Kansas to write up one and talk down another is a crime. An 
Ananias historian has tried to write a history that would make John Brown 
a demon, a thief and a murderer, and Lane a blackguard and a roustabout. 
After one reading of that history, every Kansan who lived in those days 
realizes how great a little nothing is. It is the duty of every man who was 
an integral part of those events, who lived through those scenes, to forget 
all the shortcomings of men, and preserve only their good deeds. 

Men have sought to change the verdict of the people of those days con- 
cerning John Brown and others. How futile the attempt ! You might as 
well attempt to overturn the Rocky Mountains with a lady's hairpin for a 
lever. The verdict has been rendered and is settled, not alone by the 
people of Kansas, or by the people of the nation, but by the people of the 
whole world. I conceive it to be our part, as the survivors of those days, 
to give merited place in history to those men whose heroic conduct made 
them so richly deserve it. 

I have often thought how little remembered are the real powerful actors 
of those days. I recall one. I knew him but little until 1855, first meet- 
ing him at the Big Springs convention down here in Douglas county. 
That was an important convention, and gave to the world the purposes, the 
designs and the hopes of the Free-State party of Kansas. Great men were 
there; good men were there; men who will be preserved in history. That 
convention created an executive committee. One man upon that com- 
mittee was the brain-power and ruler of them all. He caught the crude 
thoughts of others, and moulded and fashioned them with his own for the 
world to read, and by which Ave were guided and others controlled. He 
was the man of power and executive ability of that .committee. Lane and 
Robinson and George W. Brown were in occasional warfare. But this man 
ever stood as judge, and was always guided by that higher sense of right by 
which all good men are guided. He led us through the dark ways by the 
light of his brain. And yet, though the thoughts were his, though they 
were formulated by him, they came from the executive committee, and he 
individually remained unknown. This executive committee was the Moses 
that led us across the sea of oppression. 

There was a large convention held in the fall of 1855, at Topeka. This 
same man was a prominent actor there. His counsel was always sought, 



274 State Histobical Society. 

his judgment almost always relied upon. He was placed upon the execu- 
tive committee created by that convention. And, as on the other, he was 
the soul and the brain and executive power of that committee. 

Later on there was another convention, at Grasshopper Falls. He was a 
powerful factor in that convention, and was again placed upon the execu- 
tive committee created by that convention, and there did his full duty. 

When triumph crowned our efforts and we had elected a Free-State Ter- 
ritorial Legislature, he was made Secretary of the Council. And he, more 
than any member of the Council, was the legislator there. The struggle 
seeming to have been over with slavery, and a fresh struggle coming upon 
us, with the Lecompton Constitution behind it, this man conceived it to be 
his duty to return to the party of his first love and of his first convictions. 
Through him a Democratic convention was held at Leavenworth. A more 
powerful one, undoubtedly, has never met in Kansas. This man was made 
president of the convention. The power of that convention no man can 
measure. Its results no man can appreciate. It was by and through that 
Democratic convention of which this man was president, that the Demo- 
cratic Senate and the Democratic House of Representatives of the nation 
were divided among themselves. By that division the Lecompton Consti- 
tution was killed, though it had been espoused by the President of the 
United States ; and by its death came the constitution under which we were 
admitted into the Union and under which we live to-day. He seems, from 
this standpoint, to have been wiser than he knew. 

He remained with his party until the first guns were fired upon Sumter. 
Then he knew no party but that party which was for his country. He was 
in the Legislature once or twice during that terrible struggle, and always 
did his full duty there. Yet the underbrush of forgetfulness has so grown 
that but few in Kansas know that Joel K. Goodin ever lived. 

We called him a crank because he swerved from his party. We were 
all cranks. None but cranks ever came to Kansas opposing slavery. It 
w*as cranks that have built a church on every hillside and a school-house 
in every valley in the State of Kansas. It was cranks that drove the In- 
dian from these plains and compelled him to seek a more secure lodgment. 
It was cranks that have driven the buffalo and the elk almost from the face 
of the earth, and have peopled this State with well-nigh two millions of 
people. It was cranks that created the Rebellion. But that Rebellion 
made the Union free — free as it never had been before, though always 
claimed as the land of the free and the home of the brave. But that claim 
was a lie, and it should have blistered the tongue that gave it utterance. 

The Rebellion has come and gone. The cannon fired in each battle of 
the Rebellion that made the air lurid, the terrible clash of arms that stained 
the earth with human gore, was but the thunder and lightning that purified 
the air, the rain that swelled the bud, the sunshine that opened the rose 
that adorns the Garden of Liberty. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 275 

We talk about newspapers having made Kansas ! It is a mistake. It is 
the men. and women that God Almighty made and sent here that made 
Kansas and keep the newspapers alive. The newspapers, as my friend has 
said, may lie ; they doubtless do. I know they used to when I edited a 
paper. But the lies they tell to-day about Kansas and each other, they are 
ashamed of as they seek their couch at night. And they awake in the 
morning regretting, not that they had told a lie, but that they had not told 
half the truth of the morning. 

Let us stop this theory of detraction, and hunting the bad things that 
those men have done, remembering only the good they have done, and Joel 
K. Goodin and all the rest will occupy their proper places in history. But 
it is getting late. You are tired. I have said enough. I will stop. 
Good-night. 



276 STATE Historical society. 



DISCOVERER OF KANSAS. 



[A oontribntion to the State Historical Society by Hon. John P. Jones, concerning 
the claim that Lieutenant Dutisne discovered Kansas in 1719.] 

CoLDWATER, Kas., Jan. 9, 1888. 

Hon. F. G. Adams, Seci-etary State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas — 
Dear Sir: I find that it will be impossible for me to accept the kind invi- 
tation of the Board of Directors to be present at the twelfth annual meet- 
ing of our State Historical Society on the 17th, and can only thank the 
members for remembering me, expressing at the same time the pleasure it 
would have afforded me to be with you. 

May I take this opportunity of recalling to your mind the conversation 
we had last February with reference to the expedition of Lieutenant Du- 
tisne in the summer of 1719, from the Kaskaskias on the Illinois river to 
the Osages and Pawnees, in which conversation I expressed the belief that 
the Lieutenant was never in the territory now embraced in the State of 
Kansas, notwithstanding the fact that nearly all the publications that his- 
torically cover our colonial period, represent him as having visited the Pa- 
doucas, who were then located about the headwaters of the rivers we now 
know as the Solomon, Saline, and Smoky Hill. If the latter were true, he 
would have traveled two-thirds of the distance across our State diagonally, 
which would justly entitle him to the reputation so many writers have given 
him, of being the first French explorer of our territory and the first white 
man to enter it from the east. Having had occasion some years since to 
look up the career of Lieutenant Dutisne in the Mississippi Valley, where he 
took a prominent part in the affairs of his time, and becoming familiar with 
it, I was not prepared to find, as I did on coming to this State, that he was 
regarded here in the light of an explorer of this Territory. This view, I 
think, was given prominence in the first instance, in a work especially relat- 
ing to Kansas, by Edward Everett Hale, in his "Kanzas and Nebraska," 
Boston, 1854. After mentioning the visit of Dutisne to the Osages and Paw- 
nees, he says : 

"Fifteen days more westward marching brought him to the Padoucahs, a very 
brave and warlike nation. Here he erected a cross, with the arms of the king, Sep- 
tember 27th, 1719. In his report of his expedition he gives the details which we 
have quoted, and notices the salines and masses of rock salt found to this day in the 
region he traveled over. He found the Osages at the spot which they still occupy. 
If his measurements were exact, his first Pawnee village was near the mouth of Re- 
publican Fork. Fifteen days' westward travel must have been up the valley of one 
of the forks of Kansas river, but the name of the Padoucah Indians is now lost. 
. ... Dutisne, therefore, may be regarded as the discoverer of Kansas to the civ- 
ilized world." 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 211 

The foregoing statement from Mr. Hale's book seems to have been ac- 
cepted by subsequent writers as true and correct ; while as a matter of fact 
it is an error, almost in its entirety. The first point to be disposed of is, 
whether or not the Lieutenant visited the Padoucas at all, let them have 
been located where they may; and as answer to this part of Mr. Hale's 
statement I will give you the translation of Dustine's letter to Bienville, as 
it appears in Vol. 6 of Margry's Documents, relating to the discoveries of 
the French in the western part of America, published at Paris the present 
year, which is as follows : 

"The Kaskaskias, Nov. 22, 1719. 

"Sib : I do myself the honor to write the present letter to you to beg you to con- 
tinue your protection to me. You know, sir, that I have been obliged to go away 
from among the Missourys, as they did not wish me to go to the Panioussas (Paw- 
nees). This compelled me while on my return to the Illinois to offer to M. de Bois- 
briant to make the journey across the country, and he granted me permission to do 
so. The journey was attended with much trouble, as my men fell sick on the way. 
My own health remained good. I send you with this a little account of my trip. 
When I went among the Osages I was well received by them. Having explained my 
intentions to them, they answered me well in everything that regarded themselves, 
but when I spoke of going among the Panis, they all opposed it, and would not as- 
sent to the reasons which I gave for going. Having learned that they did not intend 
for me to carry away the goods which I had brought, I proposed to them to let me 
take three guns, for myself and my interpreter, telling them decidedly that if they 
did not consent I would be very angry and you would be indignant ; upon which 
they consented. Knowing the character of these savages, I did not delay, but set 
out on the road. In four days I was among the Panis, where I was very badly re- 
ceived, owing to the fact that the Osages had made them believe that our intentions 
were to entrap them and make them slaves. On that account they twice raised the 
tomahawk above me ; but when they learned the falsehoods of the Osages, and saw 
the bravery which I showed when they threatened me, brutal as these men are, they 
consented to make an alliance, and treated me very well. I traded them my three 
guns, some powder, pick-axes and a few knives, for two horses and a mule, marked 
with a Spanish brand. I proposed to them to let me pass through to the Padoucahs. 
To this they are much opposed, as they are deadly enemies. Seeing that they would 
not consent, I questioned them in regard to the Spanish. 

"They said the Spanish had been to their villages formerly, but now they pre- 
vented them from coming and barred the road. They traded me a silver cup, and 
told me that it would take more than a month to go to the Spaniards. It seems to 
me we could succeed in making peace between this tribe and the Padoucahs, and by 
this means open a route to the Spaniards. It could be done by giving back to them 
their slaves and making them presents. I told them it was your desire they should 
be fri€nds. We could yet attempt the passage by the Missoury, going to the Panis- 
mahas to carry them some presents. I have offered M. de Boisbriant to go there 
myself, and if this is your wish I am r«ady to execute it so as to merit the honor of 
your protection. I have written to the Cadodaquious chief, and have asked him to 
notify you. A Mento chief has charge of the letters. I had seen him among the 
Osages, and he had sold some slaves for me to the Natchitoches. It is from him that 
I have learned of the arrival of M. La Harpe with the large boats at the Nassourites. 
He has assured me that he would go to the Natchitoches in one month. The direc- 
tion he points out as the way to go there from the Osages is south, one-quarter 



278 State Historical Society. 



southwest. The villages of the Mentos are seven days' journey from the Osages 
southwest. The chief has promised me to come to the Illinois and bring some 
horses. The Panis have promised likewise, and they ought to come next spring, 

"As the Osages would not give me a guide to return to the Illinois, I was obliged 
to choose my own route by means of compass, bringing fourteen horses and my 
mule. I had the misfortune to lose six horses and a colt, which is a loss to me of 
several hundred francs. I refer you to M. de Boisbriant to tell you all the dilficulties 
I have passed through. I hope, sir, as I am one of the oldest lieutenants of the 
company, that you will do me the favor to procure me a company. I will try and 
merit it by my assiduity in the service. 

I am, with great respect, etc." 

It will be seen that Lieutenant Dutisne mentions that he desired to go to 
the Padoucas, but that the Pawnees would not consent, hence he tried to 
learn from them what he could concerning the Spaniards. Also that he 
thought he could reach them by way of the Missourys and Panismahas, 
who were located on the Missouri river at that time; that he had proposed 
it to M. de Boisbriant, who was the French commander at the Kaskaskias, 
and was ready to go if Bienville approved of it. If he had succeeded in 
reaching the Padoucas by way of the Panioussas, there would have been no ne- 
cessity of further effort by the way of the Missourys. There certainly is noth- 
ing in the letter to lead one to believe that he went further than the village 
of the Panioussas; and the question next is, where were they at that time? 
The lieutenant mentions that he sends "a little account of his trip" with the 
letter. This little account, as he called it, has not as yet come to my notice. 
But at the time he was exploring the country of the Osages and Pawnees, 
M. Bernard de La Harpe, another French officer, was ascending the Red 
river from its mouth, and exploring the country between it and the Arkan- 
sas, and he has left a number of journals and records of this and other 
transactions which took place while he was in the colony. 

In the sixth volume of Margry's Documents, page 310, there is given an 
extract from a relation of La Harpe's, which is apparently taken from the 
report of Dutisne, in which, after describing the country from the Kaskas- 
kias to the Osages, he says : 

"From the Osages to the Panis it is forty leagues southwest, the whole way over 
prairies and hills full of wild cattle. The lands are fine and well wooded. There 
are four rivers from the Osages to the Panis which must be crossed. The greatest 
is that of the Arkansas, which has its course towards the northwest, one-quarter 
north. Sieur du Tisne crossed i't. He then found some rapids of three feet of 
water. The other rivers were not of any consequence. They fall into the Osage 
river. This river of the Arkansas is twelve leagues east of the Panis village. This 
is situated on the bank of a river, surrounded by elevated plains, southwest of which 
is a forest of great use to them. This is a village of thirty cabins and 200 warriors. 
One league northwest on the borders of the same stream they have another village, 
as strong as the first. There are in these two villages 300 horses, which they value 
highly and could not do without. . . . According to their report it is fifteen 
days' journey to the great village of the Padoucas, but they meet them often at six 
dayfi' journey from their villages. They have a cruel war between them, so that they 
eat each other up. When they are at war they harness their horses with a cuirass of 



Sixth Biexxial Repobt. 279 



tanned leather. They are very adroit with the bow and arrow. They use a lance 
which is like a sword with a handle of wood. At two days' distance from their vil- 
lages west, one-quarter southwest, they have a mine of rock salt, which is very line 
and pure. Every time that they give food to eat to strangers the chiefs cut the 
meat into pieces and carry it to the mouths of those they feast. M. du Tisne planted 
there the flag of truce, the 27th day of September, 1719, in the middle of their vil- 
lages, which they received with pleasure." 

Dutisne found the Osages on the river of that name, probably not far from 
where it crosses the line between Kansas and Missouri, but within the ter- 
ritory now embraced by the latter State, as their home was there for an hun- 
dred years later. Four days' travel, he says — forty leagues southwest. La 
Harpe says — he found the Panis, after crossing the Arkansas and leaving it 
twelve leagues east. The river here called the Arkansas, I think was the 
Neosho, as I have another relation of La Harpe's in which it is said Dutisne 
found the Panis on a branch of the Arkansas. The small rivers that run 
into the Osage were the waters of the Little Osage and its tributaries, which 
came from a southwesterly direction. After leaving these, still traveling 
southwest, he crossed the Neosho, as I believe, and from its size thought he 
had reached the Arkansas. Twelve leagues beyond this stream he came to 
the village of the Panis, unquestionably in the boundaries of the present In- 
dian Territory. It should be borne in mind that the Pawnees at this time 
were divided into a number of different tribes, divisions of which occupied 
parts of the territory lying between the Red river on the south and the 
Platte on the north, the Aricaras being the most northern branch, and the 
Wichitas of Red river the most southern. The tribe visited by Dutisne was 
known as the Panis or Panioussas, and he mentions the tribe on the Mis- 
souri as Panismahas. Hence, in locating the tribe that he was among we 
should recollect that it was the Panioussas. On the earliest French maps 
of the country west of the Missouri we find the Panioussas placed on the 
Arkansas. DeLisle's map, 1703, locates the Panis and Panioussas on a 
branch of the Arkansas. That the tribe nearest to the Kansas Indians was 
known to the French as Panismahas is show^n by Bourgmont's narrative, in 
which it is stated that he associated with him on his journey to the Pa- 
doucas, only six years after Dutisne had failed to reach them, the Missouris, 
Otoes, Osages, lowas, Panismahas and Kansas. Starting from the village 
of the latter, the course of their journey was west-southwest, and after trav- 
eling about eighty leagues the Padoucas were met. At the treaty the great 
chief of the Panismahas made the last speech. If Mr. Hale was correct, 
and the other historians who have followed his lead, in stating that our ter- 
ritory was explored by Dutisne, it is evident to me that the latter would 
have said that after four days' travel he arrived at the village of the Panis- 
mahas, as he knew this location, and states in his letter that he thought the 
Padoucas could be reached by passing through their territory by way of the 
Missouri. 



280 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

The following note in La Harpe's narrative confirms my view of the loca- 
tion of the Panioussas. It says, referring to the Indians between the Red 
and Arkansas rivers: 

"They make together 4,000 persons. They are allies of the Panioussas, who are 
forty leagues distant on the north. Although they are at peace with the Osages, 
they defy them. This tribe is situated forty leagues northeast. They are also allied 
with the wandering tribes on the upper part of Red river, but they carry on a cruel 
war with the Canecy, the Padoucas and with several of the Panis villages. They 
know the Aricaras, established on the Causes side on the Missouri." 

There is nothing in Dutisne's letter or the relation of La Harpe to indi- 
cate that his expedition did not end at the Pawnee village. He speaks of 
another village as being located farther up the stream ; of the salines which 
were two days, distance west, and of the Padoucas, who were reported as fif- 
teen days' distance, but says nothing of having visited either. On the con- 
trary* he seems to have raised a flag at the Pawnee village, and turned 
backward toward the Illinois, hoping to be allowed to try and reach the 
Padoucas by a more northerly route. This it was not his fortune to do. The 
Spaniards were threatening to drive the French from the Illinois country 
while the latter were endeavoring to strengthen themselves there and to 
open the route to the gold mines which they supposed existed in New Mex- 
ico, and of which they were continually hearing fabulous accounts. Dutisne 
was called to the lower Mississippi, and the duties of mediator between the 
French on the Illinois and the Indians of the West fell to the lot of S. De 
Bourgmont, who a few years later succeeded in negotiating a treaty of peace 
which embraced nearly all the tribes on the lower Missouri and its tribu- 
taries. 

I should like to write you more on this subject, but think I have said 
enough to maintain my position in reference to Dutisne, and will not tres- 
pass further. Yours respectfully, 

John P. Jones. 



Sixth Bie^tnial Repobt. 281 



SOUTHWEST KAI^ifSAS. 



[A paper presented by J. S. Painter, editor of the Garden City Herald, to the State 
Historical Society, at the annual meeting, January 17, 1888.] 

The subject which I have chosen as the basis of a few remarks on this oc- 
casion will not startle any one with its novelty, but I trust that what I 
shall say about it will be of interest. 

We are making history in southwestern Kansas so rapidly that simply to 
think of it, even in the calmest manner possible, nearly takes one's breath. 
Everything in the country bears the insignia of progress, from the recently 
appropriated claim of the settler who has just arrived from the East, to the 
newly-platted town-site, euphoniously advertised as the " Infant Wonder," 
or "The Child of Destiny," the possibilities of which are hidden in the 
womb of futurity, and pretty well hidden at that. But I do not often make 
such truthful and frank confessions at home — that is, in the neighborhood 
of these ambitious towns. It is not healthy to do so. The whole country 
is undergoing a transformation quite as marvelous as anything recorded in 
mythical lore. Towns spring up in a single day, as if by magic, and, when 
a week old, aspire for county-seat honors. Every one of them expects to 
be a Chicago in five years, and most of the inhabitants can present such an 
irresistible array of arguments in proof of the fact that it is dangerous to 
discuss the question with them. I have known persons, more incredulous 
than wise, to express a doubt on a plain proposition of this character, and 
to seriously regret it afterwards. It often requires a whole calendar month 
to recover from an argument of this kind, the logic of the opposing dis- 
putant is so positive and convincing. I could cite a great many instances 
illustrative of this point, but I do not care to go into details. 

All of these aspiring towns are located on one or more lines of railway 
that can be seen on the maps, if they cannot be found anywhere else, and 
each one is so situated as to control the trade of a territory several hundred 
miles square — at least the local newspapers unite in saying so; and with 
all my waywardness and indiscretion I have never been reckless enough to 
discredit such authoritative sources of information and truth. 

One of the peculiarities of the people of this section is, that each town 
makes its own local geography, and it is high treason for those of any other 
locality to question its authenticity. The maps show each town to be a 
county seat, and to have lines of railroad radiating towards all points of the 
compass. If the people of southwestern Kansas have a passion for any- 
thing that cannot be satiated short of possession, it is their hungry desire 
for county seats. Most of the counties have three, and the residents anx- 
iously, madly long for more. They are usually distinguished as the county 



282 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

seat de facto, the county seat de jure, and the one that is under considera- 
tion by the Supreme Court, which has never been christened, and the only 
one that is not liable to a change of venue as the result of some new town- 
site speculation. Hamilton county, on the extreme western border, is espe- 
cially blessed with seats of county government. It has four, and some of the 
people who have settled in the county recently, and have not had an oppor- 
tunity of expressing their preference, are looking around for a piece of land 
on which to locate another ! The original county seat was at Kendall, by 
virtue of a proclamation issued by the Governor. It still remains there vi 
et armis. The second county seat was established at Syracuse by a fraudu- 
lent election, at which 1178 votes were polled by a little village of less than 
500 inhabitants. In examining into this matter, the Supreme Court ex- 
pressed a belief that most of these votes were cast by the judges and clerks 
of election after the ballot-box was closed ; but I think it was a mathemat- 
ical miracle, like the loaves and fishes, which cannot be accounted for by 
any of the customary methods of reasoning. The progeny of this fraudu- 
lent accouchement still lives, and, contrary to the ordinary expectancy of 
such monstrosities, is quite healthy and strong, and has even quite a num- 
ber of curious admirers. Another election was held, and a third county 
seat was corralled at Coolidge by almost unanimous consent. The fourth 
one is a result of a legal contest between Kendall and Syracuse, and now 
reposes quietly among the dusty archives of the Supreme Court, and we pre- 
sume it is a great deal safer and more comfortable there than it would be 
roaming around over the bleak prairies of Hamilton county in the winter 
season. 

Five years ago that portion of southwestern Kansas known as the Gar- 
den City land district, which embraces fourteen counties, was a treeless, 
unproductive waste, a solemn, expansive wilderness of unbroken prairies, 
wind-swept, storm-bent and uninhabited, save by a few hardy, enterprising 
stockmen, who for the most part, led a roving, pastoral life, and grazed 
their growing herds, without let or hindrance, upon the native grasses of the 
public domain. The plow and other implements of husbandry were un- 
known. The soil, which had been gathering fertility from the repose of 
centuries, was lavishing its strength in the production of buffalo grass, soap- 
weed and cactus. The cow-boy "rode the range" with the lawless and 
reckless daring of the oriental barbarian. There were no evidences of ap- 
proaching civilization, except an occasional empty whisky bottle found be- 
side some winding trail, or the fugitive tin-tag extracted from a recently 
acquired plug of "spitting tobacco." Dodge City was the western limit of 
settlement, and the man who could live there a whole year without being 
shot or hung was regarded as the special proteg^ of Providence, and death 
refused to tackle him in the daytime without reinforcements. But in 1884 
a change came, and immigrants from all parts of the East began to settle on 
the bottom lands of the Arkansas and lesser streams. They came slowly at 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 283 



first, increasing in numbers each successive month, until in April, 1885, a 
boom commenced that never before was equaled in the settlement of any 
country. Every train was loaded with battalions of the invading army of 
home-seekers, who came to conquer and possess the land. The roads were 
lined with an apparently endless procession of prairie schooners and other 
vehicles filled with a varied mass of humanity, household effects and farm- 
ing implements — heirlooms of the old home. They came by thousands and 
scattered over the country, like the swarms of grasshoppers which infested 
the State in the early days, but, unlike those pests, they came not to destroy, 
but to build up. These immigrants were not the riff-raff and pauperized 
surplus of foreign shores, the indigent and criminal effervescence of large 
cities, but the flower of the nation — stalwart men and healthy women, from 
the rural districts of the Middle and Eastern States, who came to labor and 
wait, do and dare, in order that they might have homes of their own when 
accumulating years shall have touched their heads with the rime-rune of age 
and furrowed their cheeks Avith the lines of time. Most of them were young 
men, under thirty years of age, and, like the young hickories in the open 
woods, constitute the undergrowth of the wilderness of liberty, the ho])e and 
strength of this new empire, carved out of the erstwhile desert plain, which 
in a few years will surprise the world with its Corinthian proportions and 
the excellences of its achievements. 

In order to show something of the rapidity with which this country has 
been settled, I shall be pardoned, I trust, for introducing a fe\v figures care- 
fully compiled from records of the U. S. Land Office at Garden City. I 
am aware that statistics, as a rule, are dry and uninteresting, but those who 
wish to get a clear and accurate idea of the growth and development of this 
now important part of our commonw-ealth will not only appreciate the re- 
sults of such research, but will be glad to perpetuate these statistical facts 
with others in the archives of this Society. To those interested in a subject, 
statistics are far from being the barren array of figures ingeniously and la- 
boriously combined into columns and tables, which indifi'erent persons are 
apt to suppose them. They constitute rather the ledger of the State or Na- 
tion in which, like the merchant in his books, the citizen can read, at one 
view, all the results of a year, as compared with other years or periods, and 
deduce the profit or the loss which has been made, in morals, education, pop- 
ulation, wealth, or power. The Garden City land district is composed of the 
territory now included in Clark, Finney, Ford, Gray, Garfield, Grant, Ham- 
ilton, Haskell, Kearny, Meade, Morton, Seward, Stevens and Stanton counties, 
and a part of Hodgeman, in all about 11,350 square miles, or 7,246,000 acres. 
In the last five years over 6,000,00D acres of this vast area has been appro- 
priated under the homestead, preemption, and timber-culture laws, and are 
now the property of individual owners, a very great proportion of whom are 
actual residents of the counties named. Most of these entries have been 
made since the beginning of 1885, as there had been but comparatively lit- 

—19 



284 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

tie stir prior to that date. The material development of the southwest has 
kept pace with the increase of population. Thousands upon thousands of 
acres of sod have been broken and planted to crops, the yield of which has 
exceeded the most sanguine expectations. Twenty-five thousand houses 
have been built by settlers on the farms of this new district, and nearly 
one hundred and fifty thousand acres have been planted in fruit and forest 
trees. Almost fifteen thousand claim-holders have made final proof, trans- 
ferring the title from the Government to private ownership of nearly two 
and one-half million acres of land. This vast area is unsurpassed in fertil- 
ity, the soil ranging from fourteen inches to six feet in depth, and capable 
of sustaining a population quite as dense as that of any part of the Union. 
In the spring of 1885 there were but six towns in the territory now em- 
braced in the Garden City land district, and excepting Dodge City, which 
had long been a shipping point for the cattle-growers of southwestern Kan- 
sas, eastern Colorado, No Man's Land, northern Texas, and northeastern 
New Mexico, the combined population did not exceed one thousand. To-day 
there are thirty-eight towns in the district, ranging in population from two 
hundred to six thousand, namely : Dodge City, Ford City, Speareville and 
Wilburn, in Ford county ; Ingalls, Cimarron and Montezuma, in Gray 
county ; Garden City, Pierceville and Terry, in Finney county ; Chantilly, 
Hartland and Lakin, in Kearny county ; Coolidge, Kendall and Syracuse, 
in Hamilton county ; Johnson City and Eli, in Stanton county ; Cincinnati, 
Ulysses and Surprise, in Grant county ; Santa Fe and Ivanhoe, in Haskell 
county ; Ashland, Englewood and Minneola, in Clark county ; Meade Cen- 
ter, Fowler City and West Plains, in Meade county ; Springfield and Fargo 
Springs, in Seward county; Hugoton and Woodsdale, in Stevens county; 
Richfield, Frisco and Taloga, in Morton county; and Eminence and Ra- 
vanna, in Garfield county; besides nineteen other places that are confident 
of being railroad centers in the "sweet by and by," and most of which enjoy 
the luxury of a local newspaper, supported by a town company and Gov- 
ernment printing in the shape of land notices. Twenty-eight out of the 
thirty-two towns mentioned have good schools, and most of them have sub- 
stantial school buildings costing from ten to fifteen thousand dollars each, 
supplied with all modern appliances and conveniences. All but two have 
regular church services of one or more denominations, and a majority of 
them have one or two church edifices that will accommodate from two to 
five hundred persons. Most of them have lodges of the principal secret soci- 
eties, and posts of the Grand Army of the Republic. The people are pro- 
gressive and public-spirited, and generously contribute of their means to 
assist any enterprise that promises to promote the educational, moral, com- 
mercial and social interests of their respective localities. A high moral 
sense pervades each community, and as a rule the laws are as readily and 
thoroughly enforced as in the older sections of the Union. In fact, about 
the only oflfenses that have been committed in this part of the State since 



( 



I 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 285 

its settlement have been violations of the prohibitory law, in counties where 
there was no organized government, and a disregard of the provisions con- 
trolling elections in contests where the prize to be secured was the all- 
important one, the permanent location of a county seat. The last saloon, 
however, has long since been wiped out, and the recent enactment of a law 
providing for grand }uries has made the selling of intoxicants, under the 
guise of a drug store, more dangerous than the handling of dynamite by in- 
experienced hands. The county-seat contests will soon be settled by the 
inevitable supremacy of right, and the commercial growth of the towns lo- 
cated on the proposed lines of railway that are reaching out to control the 
trade of this vast region of fertile soil, and then a period of prosperity will 
begin which can only result in a high state of civilization and superior in- 
dustrial development. The future for southwestern Kansas is full of prom- 
ise. It has not only a wonderfully varied and fertile soil, adapted to the 
prodiiction of all kinds of cereals, vegetables and fruits that can be grown 
in the temperate zone, but has a superb climate, not surpassed, taking every- 
thing into consideration, and only equaled by a few places on the American 
continent. The average altitude of this region is about twenty-six hundred 
feet above sea level, and consequently the air is always pure and invigorat- 
ing. The summers are long and pleasant, the winters short and mild. 

"Stern -winter smiles on this auspicious clime. 
The fields are florid with unfading prime; 
From the bleak pole no winds inclement blow, 
Mould the round hail or flake the fleecy snow; 
But from the verdant plains the bless'd inhale 
The fragrant murmurs of the western gale." 

Flowers bloom nine months in the year, and give forth a fragrance that 
is as soothing to the senses as the memory of some sweet dream. The very 
weeds so bloom beneath the kindly sun and make such gorgeous show of 
color, that what is wantonly hidden here by the ruthless plow would be 
cherished by the people of the East as "a thing of beauty and a joy for- 
ever." 

Southwestern Kansas is a healthy country. The potent and curative ef- 
fects of altitude upon certain diseases have long been conceded by medical 
men, as well as other intelligent observers. Nothing is more common than 
for people to say that the air of western Kansas invigorates them like new 
wine. It has been declared that "an unclouded mind partakes of the elas- 
ticity of a healthy body, and the unwonted vigor of man's intellect is mani- 
fested by a newly-aroused desire for activity and by an increased capability 
to accomplish." Every brain-worker will attest the truth of this declara- 
tion, and nowhere in the whole country are the professions and all manner 
of business pursuits prosecuted with so much vigor and success as in south- 
western Kansas. Men are improved mentally and socially as well as phys- 
ically by emigrating to this country. There can be no doubt of this fact. 



286 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Invalidism always affects meDtal conditions, and a dyspeptic person, or a 
sufferer from any chronic ailment, however inconsequential, cannot help but 
lose a little good temper. With restored health comes not only renewed 
energy, but a brighter view of life. The world seems a better place than it 
was. Companionship is pleasant, and that, no doubt, is what makes the 
people of southwestern Kansas superior to all others in the manifestation of 
real, substantial friendship and hearty good-will. 

It is a beautiful country — an embryotic poem — a picture still lacking a 
few delicate touches — a romance with the last chapter yet unwritten — 
gorgeous in its native grandeur, but destined to be more beautiful when 
time, and the conscientious energies of its people, shall have solved the 
mighty problem of its higher and more perfect civilization. Truly, it is a 
goodly land which the Lord our God has given us, and, inspired with grate- 
ful appreciation as well as patriotic devotion, we sincerely echo the words 
of the poet: 

"Great God! we thank thee for this home — 
This bounteous birthland of the free; 
Where wanderers from afar may come. 

And breathe the air of liberty. 
Still may her flowers untrampled spring, 

Her harvests wave, her cities rise; 

And yet, till time shall fold his wing, 

Remain earth's loveliest paradise." 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 287 



THE SWEDES IN KANSAS. 



[A paper written by President C. A. Swensson, of Bethany College, Lindsborg, for 
the annual meeting of the State Historical Society, January 17, 1888.] 

Gentlemen: It would have afforded me great j^leasure to attend your 
meeting, thereby getting into yet more intimate connection with the past 
w^onderful and inspiring history of our young giant State, and also with the 
present and future noble development of the coming central State of the 
Union ; but duties in connection with our work here made it impossible for 
me to come. 

The history of the Swedish-American element in America, and in Kan- 
sas especially, is one of special importance just now when the foreign immi- 
gration is such a timely and popular subject for discussion. Our people 
began settling in Kansas in the fifties, (about '57 or '58, I think.) Maria- 
dahl, in Pottawatomie county, near Randolph, is the first settlement of 
Swedes in Kansas. Hon. John A. Johnson, of Randolph, is one of the pi- 
oneers of Swedish Kansas. About the same time Mr. Jaderberg, of Enter- 
prise, Dickinson county, came to Kansas. I do not know where he settled 
at first. A company, with Dr. C. Gran, of Henry county, Illinois, as the 
leader, came to Kansas early in the sixties to find a place for the Swedish 
colony. I think that the fine Neosho valley suited them better than any- 
thing else. 

The great Swedish immigration, however, took place in 1869-1870 and the 
years immediately following. The great colonies in Saline and McPherson 
counties were then founded. Our people have been moving into the State 
ever since, until we now claim about 50,000 Swedes, their children included, 
in this State. Our principal colonies are situated in Pottawatomie, Riley, 
Marshall, Clay, Republic, Dickinson, Saline, McPherson, Rice, Pawnee, Reno, 
Allen, Osage, Decatur, Rawlins and Logan counties. In the cities of To- 
peka, Lawrence, Kansas City (Kas.), Salina, McPherson, Hutchinson and 
Osage we have a good sprinkling of Swedish citizens. Lindsborg, almost 
entirely Swedish, is the social and religious center of the Swedes in the en- 
tire Southwest. Immense new colonies are being founded in the western 
part of Kansas, about 150,000 acres of railroad lands alone having been 
sold to our people during the last year. 

The discussion of the foreign immigration question at present is too in- 
discriminate, I think. Going to the very bottom of things, the natives of 
this grand country of ours are to-day largely domiciled in the Indian Ter- 
ritory. The immigration of foreigners into America has been the making 
of this republic. Our condemnation of the "foreigners" should therefore 
be tempered with a good deal of common-sense and the history of the facts 



288 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

in the case; otherwise there will be raised a host of gainsayers, to say the 
least. Take the Swedes, for instance. They came to America, many of them, 
in absolute poverty ; but have they anywhere or under any circumstances 
failed to become good citizens? What is the condition of their great colo- 
nies in Kansas, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska? The answer is 
unusually unanimous. They have converted wastes and deserts into the 
finest agricultural districts imaginable; have themselves become prosperous 
citizens, and are everywhere raising a "second crop" of Swedes, natives of 
America, that are taking place in the front ranks of the best civilization in 
the world. Have you ever heard of a Swedish anarchist, communist, or 
nihilist ? No, we are not made that way ; we come from a free and noble 
people, and our history as a free people dates back at least to the beginning 
of the Christian era. I for one, and as an American citizen by birth, will 
say that that is the kind of material to make good American citizens out of. 

The Syredes of America in the 60's flocked to the banners of the Union, 
in the civil war then waging. They were by nature, so to speak, on the 
right side. The Swedes of Kansas and Iowa, as a class, have worked hard 
for prohibition, and that as good Kepublicans — because every Swede is born 
a Republican, and will remain such if no unforeseen accidents overtake 
him. 

The Swedes of Kansas have built, here at Lindsborg, one of the finest 
colleges in the entire West. This college is not a " real-estate agency," but 
is a thing of reality, with seven departments, sixteen instructors, and 350 stu- 
dents. The buildings are large and the equipment altogether modern and 
up to date. The medium of instruction is almost exclusively the English 
language. 

Let us, therefore, in denouncing the "foreigners," never forget that we 
were all foreigners once, that there are different kinds of foreigners even 
to-day, and that the Swedes have always been an industrious, intelligent, 
peaceable and law-abiding people. 



Sixth Biennial Be post. 289 



THE COUNTRY WEST OF TOPEKA PRIOR TO 1865. 



[An address delivered before the State Historical Society by Hon. James Humphrey, 
at the annual meeting, January 15, 1889.] 

The limits assigned to this paper confine the narrative to a sketch of the 
progress of settlement and a description of the life of the early communi- 
ties in that portion of Kansas lying west of Shawnee county prior to 1865. 
Since this portion of Kansas was not within the theater of that active 
conflict between antagonistic forces striving for the mastery in the Terri- 
torial era, nor the seat of government, no events usually deemed historical 
occurred to disturb the monotony of ordinary aflairs. Nevertheless, the 
immigration of people to hitherto unredeemed wastes, the founding of new 
communities, reclaiming the primeval wilderness, and turning the forces of 
nature in untried fields to the production of those objects which increase 
human comfort and add to the stores of wealth, are events of no ordinary 
historical interest and value. They possess a subjective significance, inas- 
much as all new situations and environments modify human character, 
drawing out and stimulating a varied energy, a diversified order of abilities 
and aptitudes, and a quickened fertility of invention where the natural re- 
sources exist in abundant variety, but conducing to the evolution of a more 
uniform type of character where the conditions call for a less varied display 
of energy. 

I shall not attempt to describe the course of settlement and the conditions 
existing in those portions of Kansas west of Topeka, lying remote from the 
line of the Kansas river. The limits of this paper would not permit the 
gatheriug-up of incidents and events which would serve to illustrate so large 
a field. This, indeed, would be unnecessary for the purpose of this sketch, 
since the conditions being very nearly similar, several examples may stand 
as a type of the rest. 

The first settlements followed the established lines of travel. The military 
road from Fort Leavenworth w^est, leading to military posts planted at in- 
tervals upon the extreme frontier, was the line upon which the earliest 
and most prosperous settlements spread out. Not only was this line secure 
from Indian incursions, but the traflSc which sprang up along it to supply 
the wants of the stream of travel and the demands of the military gar- 
risons, furnished at once a market for the simple productions of the soil. 

The Kansas river runs through an alluvial plain, averaging about four 
miles in width west of Topeka. The plain upon each side ascends abruptly 
to an elevation of from one hundred and fifty to three hundred feet to a 
limitless stretch of undulating plains, whose fertility is hardly inferior to 



290 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

that of the river bottoms. Thus the level plains are bounded upon each 
side by lines of bluffs of remarkable uniformity, whose outline is inter- 
rupted at intervals by the lateral water-courses which drain the uplands 
and pour their contents into the river below. Along the margin of the 
river and its lateral tributaries were narrow belts of timber, of such vari- 
eties as were indigenous to this soil, and these were the chief attractions to 
the first settlers. These were the sole means then resorted to out of which 
to construct habitations and fences, and they furnished the cheapest and 
readiest means available. The first settlers planted themselves along these 
water-courses, and were at first disposed along the margin of the streams 
where the timber grew. The houses were chiefly built of logs cut into con- 
venient lengths and roofed with "shakes" for shingles, these being thin, 
short boards, shaved or split from straight-grained logs. These humble 
dwellings at that time sheltered the heads of men, many of whom had been 
reared in the haunts of a high civilization, and whose minds had been re- 
fined and stored with various learning. They were the abodes of hos- 
pitable men and women, whose generous welcome was not in the least 
marred by the absence of rich viands from the board, but whose guests, 
amid congenial companionships, discovered a feast in corn bread and bacon. 
One of the early sources of contention that arose among the early settlers 
in this part of Kansas, was contests between rival claimants to the same 
tract of land. Adventurous interlopers watching for opportunities to im- 
pugn the right of a prior claimant to a choice selection under the preemp- 
tion laws, would assert a claim over that first made to the same tract of land. 
Then again the public land surveys had not been extended this far west at 
the period of first settlement, and it quite frequently happened that when 
the boundary-lines of sections and subdivisions were run, two preemption 
claimants were within the lines of the same quarter-section, or if the whole 
tract between them was not in controversy, some portion of the same tract 
would be claimed by each. Conflicting claims of this character gave rise 
to many prolonged and bitter suits before the land ofliices, in some of which 
the costs and expenses involved in the litigation far exceeded the value of 
the land. The best right depended upon priority and continuous settlement 
upon the tract in dispute; and as a settlement might lawfully be made with- 
out immediate visible occupancy, it frequently became a diflicult question 
to decide which of the two claimants acquired the first right. The neighbor- 
hood assumed sides in these controversies, the nature of their sympathies 
and recollections determining them to the one side or the other. In some 
instances, where the rival claimants were men of local prominence, these 
contests were, in those days of partial isolation, events of no small im- 
portance. They formed the staple of neighborhood discussion as long as 
they lasted. The man among them who had seen a copy of Blackstone once 
or twice in his life, or who had heard a hint dropped by the lawyer on his 
side, was wont to discourse learnedly upon the legal aspects of the case, and 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 291 

he would be listened to with all the deference due to an oracle. Besides 
rescuing the rural population from social stagnation, these land contests 
gave profitable employment to young lawyers at a time when the courts had 
hardly got fairly under way. 

In recounting the history of a mixed community, partly rural and partly 
urban, during the formative period, the chief center of interest is the town. 
Through this the stream of trade flows. It is the seat and center of official 
life; the focus of a more varied and intense activity, where institutions, 
educational, social and religious, which give form and character to the com- 
munity, first appear, and are nourished into permanent growth. The history 
of a community is largely the history of the town which exists in its midst. 
The country and town are interdependent, but the town gives rise to greater 
unity of character, is the chief source of events, and of diff'usive influence. 

During the period covered by this narrative the settlements reached west- 
ward to Saline county : beyond that was the great American desert and 
the trail to Pike's Peak. The towns of chief local concern were Manhattan, 
Ogden, Junction City, Wabaunsee, Alma, Louisville, Abilene, and Salina. 
The best portion of Pottawatomie county was then an Indian reservation. 
An Indian village at St. Marys, the seat of a Catholic school, which has 
since grown into a large, well-appointed and influential college, predated 
the organization of the Territory. Pawnee, designated by Governor Keeder 
as the seat of the new Territorial Government, had but a brief existence. 
It was within the lines of the Fort Riley reservation, and was snuffed out 
by an order from Washington to vacate. 

November 8th, 1854, the Territory of Kansas Avas by executive order 
divided into sixteen election districts. This portion of Kansas was com- 
prised in the Ninth and Tenth districts, excluding the Pottawatomie res- 
ervation. At an election held on the 30th of March, 1855, for members of 
the first Legislative Assembly of the Territory, Martin F. Conway was 
elected to the Council and Samuel D. Houston to the House of Represent- 
atives. The Ninth and Tenth districts then contained 99 voters, and 
embraced all the territory north of the Kansas river and west of the Ver- 
million, in Pottawatomie county, except the northern part of Pottawatomie 
and Marshall counties, which constituted the Eleventh election district. 

Manhattan was the first town to be located west of Topeka. A Boston 
company, at the head of which was Prof. Isaac T. Goodnow, pitched their 
tent and established headquarters upon the present site of Manhattan, March 
24, 1855. S. D. Houston and associates had already selected a quarter- 
section near the selection of the Boston company for a town-site, and named 
it Canton. The two effected a consolidation, and gave the resulting town- 
site the name of Boston. During that spring a company formed at Cin- 
cinnati sent an expedition to Kansas to look up an eligible place for a 
town, under the lead of Andrew J. Mead and John Pipher. The colony 
consisting of 75 persons and the material for ten frame houses, came in an 



292 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Ohio river steamer, intending to settle above Fort Riley. They reached the 
mouth of the Blue June 1, 1855, where the boat grounded. The Boston com- 
pany offered the Cincinnati colony a portion of their town-site: the offer was 
accepted, and the name was again changed — now to Manhattan. 

The location was one of marked natural advantages for a town. Situated 
at the confluence of the Blue with the Kansas river, and several creek val- 
leys descending toward the town, it might naturally expect to command an 
extensive local trade. At this time too, navigation of the Kansas river 
was deemed feasible, and Manhattan would become the chief entrepot of 
the river commerce for the western country. These dreams were indulged 
until repeated attempts to render the stream tributary to commerce had 
proved futile. The scenery surrounding it presented a pleasant and varied 
aspect. The level plain upon which the town-site was laid off was bounded 
on the north by a line of bluffs presenting a bold and rounded form near 
the river bank, terminating in rising upland swells to the west; by the two 
rivers east and south, and beyond the Kansas, bearing to the southwest, a 
long outline of steep hills of undulating form. The grounds and surround- 
ings were not exactly classic, though they first attracted the eye, and drew 
to their vicinity men who had delved in classic lore; and thus was Man- 
hattan launched upon the stream of history. 

Although the town drew to its bosom a varied population, its leading 
characteristics were of the New England type. While its material progress 
was carefully attended to and watched with solicitude and interest, it early 
became the scene of much mental activity. In 1856 a literary society was 
incorporated and organized, a circulating library collected, and weekly 
meetings for discussions and other literary exercises were conducted under 
its auspices. Besides this, an association was formed, and clothed with 
corporate authority, having for its object the establishment of a college. 
This in an infant community, where the destiny of freedom or slavery was 
trembling in the balance, would appear to have been an unpromising enter- 
prise, but not so to these New England men, who scanned the future with 
prophetic vision. A site of 100 acres was selected for this institution upon 
the rising ground west of the town, and the title procured. Prof. Goodnow 
spent several years of unremitting labor to raise the funds for a suitable 
building, apparatus, furnishings and library, by soliciting from friends and 
the sale of Manhattan town lots set apart for that purpose, and in 1859 the 
walls of the Blue Mont College building began to rise. The corner-stone 
was laid with elaborate ceremony May 10, 1859, with speeches from General 
Pomeroy and others. It was opened for the reception of students about 
one year thereafter, and continued under the auspices of the Blue Mont 
College Association until July, 1863, when it was turned over, with a 
library of 2,000 volumes, its apparatus and land, as a gift to the State for a 
State Agricultural College. The Agricultural College was opened with 
Rev. Joseph Denison, President, September 2, 1863, and was conducted 



Sixth biennial Be poet. 293 

under his presidency ten years. Tiie appropriations during the first years 
of its existence were somewhat meager. Its endowment fund, too, had to 
be created by the slow process of sales of the lands set apart by the General 
Government for its support, and its development in directions requiring con- 
siderable expenditure was necessarily slow. A high grade of scholarship 
was however early established. Several of its early graduates have since 
risen to positions of mark and distinction. One of the pressing needs of 
that time was competent teachers to take charge of the common schools, 
and the State Agricultural College contributed liberally to the supply. 

The limits assigned me will not permit a detailed history of this institu- 
tion, nor can I pursue it to its present ample proportions and marked suc- 
cess. For the same reason I cannot stop to detail how these men built 
school-houses and churches, ordained ministers, established missions, con- 
verted the heathen, out of weakness were made strong, and vanquished all 
obstacles. A crowd of reminiscences force themselves upon me which belong 
to local history, but would be out of place in the brief summary I am set 
to present. 

During this early period the legal atmosphere was somewhat befogged, 
and for a time the administration of justice was decidedly frontierish. By 
act of the first Legislative Assembly the probate judges were given general 
jurisdiction. The act was later declared to be in conflict with the organic 
act, but until this decision reduced the probate court to its proper functions 
the jurisdiction which the act sought to confer was exercised. One of the 
early judges of this court in Riley county was Robert Reynolds, sr., an ec- 
centric man of strong prejudices, especially against prominent Free-State 
men. Upon one occasion, having summoned the grand jury, one of the 
members of which was obnoxious to the charge of being an earnest Free- 
State man, he demanded as a test of his loyalty and competence to act as a 
grand juror his support of the administration of Franklin Pierce. The 
juror not reaching this high standard, he was dismissed. Upon another oc- 
casion, not being satisfied of the qualifications of the lawyers who practiced 
at his bar, he required them to be examined and readmitted. Whether 
this implied a reflection on the intelligence of the lawyers or the judge, I 
shall not undertake to determine. Another incident of peculiar complexion 
from a judicial standpoint was related to me at the time by one of the 
actors in the scene. E. M. Thurston, then prominent in Free-State coun- 
cils, appeared in this court on behalf of a client. The rulings of the judge 
being persistently adverse to him, he took exceptions, the frequency of 
which nettled the judge, and he construed them to be personal, and proposed 
a settlement of these differences outside of the court-room. These judicial 
methods were not habitual, however, and the country justice improved on 
them when, summoning a defendant before him to answer for a misde- 
meanor, and, not knowing exactly how to open the proceedings, called for 
a motion. The defendant's attorney moved the discharge of the defendant, 



294 State Histobical Society. 

and this, being as promptly seconded, was put and carried, and thus was 
justice dispensed with with the aid of the vox populi. The appearance of 
Judge Elmore subsequently upon the bench in this part of the district 
cleared up the legal atmosphere and established the legal bearings of the 
community. 

During these early years the population did not increase rapidly in this 
portion of Kansas. The means of transportation were meager and expen- 
sive, but it expanded, and pushed slowly to the westward. Ogden caught 
the debris of Pawnee when that ill-fated town was swept from its moorings 
by an official cyclone from Washington. It became, and held the county 
seat of Kiley county until 1858, when it was removed to Manhattan. 

Junction City, the next central settlement west, was laid out and platted 
in 1858. Its surroundings present scenics of natural beauty equal to those 
of Manhattan. Situated at the foot of the two great valleys of the Repub- 
lican and Smoky Hill rivers, its advantages as a point for trade -are at once 
established. Its growth was more rapid, and its history in some respects 
more varied and eventful than that of its more dignified and orthodox 
neighbor at the mouth of the Blue. 

Two different ideas underlaid the founding of Manhattan and Junction 
City. The commercial motive was the chief incentive to each. In the case 
of Manhattan the original scheme comprehended a finished community: 
schools, churches, college, libraries and literary societies all existed in em- 
bryo, ready to be launched forth at the earliest opportunity. In Junction 
City a town-site was platted, hotel and saloon started, and the rest was ex- 
pected to follow by a process of natural evolution. In the one the social, 
intellectual and moral needs of the people were anticipated; in the other 
those needs were left to call into existence the means for their own satisfac- 
tion. Manhattan bore the image and superscription of New England, Junc- 
tion City of the frontier. If the local census did not quite meet public 
expectation, it was increased by a vote of the City Council. Many of her 
business men were possessed of great push and energy. They speculated, 
dealt in everything, grew rich fast, lived high, and soon retired, "dead 
broke." Many of them scattered out to the known and unknown regions 
of the earth, and left the business and other interests of the town in the 
hands of men who had learned that the earth was not made in a day, and 
was not to be devoured in the same length of time. 

Schools and churches came, but they grew, and their growth was not 
rapid. Junction City ultimately attained a high degree of civilization, but 
in reaching it, like many other Kansas towns, it passed through the frontier 
and cowboy stages. 

In 1859 a newspaper was established, which proved to be a lively sheet. 
This was soon afterwards turned over to George W. Martin, who made it 
livelier still. The history of Junction City is recorded in twenty-odd vol- 
umes of the Junction City Umon, and cannot be compressed within the 



Sixth biennial Bepobt. 295 

limits of a few pages. No history of the town can be written without 
making distinguishing note of the Union. Its tone was vigorous and ag- 
gressive; it possessed the most marked individuality of, perhaps, any paper 
in the State. Many able pens wrote for it at different times, but they all 
caught its gait and tone. For years it was Junction City's chief evangel. 
It castigated the vicious, rebuked the sinner, raised its voice like one crying 
in the wilderness against "Owl" clubs and other midnight carousals. It 
was a potent factor in local affairs, and its influence extended to every 
quarter of the State. It is an immense advantage to a town to be repre- 
sented in the wide world by a newspaper in an attractive dress and full of 
live thought. 

Near to the town stands Fort Riley. Several officers then stationed 
there, who afterwards became famous, were to some extent identified with 
the history of the town; among them General Lyon and General J. E. B. 
Stuart. The two latter were in 1860 admitted to the bar of the District 
Court of Davis county. In passing upon the report of their examination 
the judge announced that he would make the order for their admission nisi, 
which being interpreted was understood to mean that their admission was 
on condition that they produced a basket. of champagne. It is needless to 
say that the nature of the order had been anticipated. 

In the early period of its history Junction City contained a Southern ele- 
ment, which upon the approach of secession became rampant. It was de- 
clared that the national flag should not wave in the air at Junction City. 
This, however, was quickly settled by Capt. J. R. McClure, who before the 
assembled town hoisted the colors in the public square, and defended the 
Union cause in an earnest speech, standing under its ample folds. Junction 
City raised the first company in this part of Kansas for service in the same 
cause, which was led by Capt. McClure to the front. During the ensuing 
four years the spirit of the community was military. Those not enrolled 
in the army were arming and drilling. In the meantime the population 
remained nearly stationary. After the close of the war and the approach 
of the railroad, the material progress of the town was rapid ; but this be- 
longs to a later period than that I have undertaken to narrate. In the 
meantime settlements were thinly scattering out in the vast solitude beyond. 

As you ascend the Smoky Hill fork of the Kansas river, you observe that 
the configuration of the country and characteristics of the soil remain sub- 
stantially unchanged from the general aspects of the Kansas below, until 
the vicinity of Abilene is reached, where the level river plains, instead of 
being confined by lines of steep bluffs, extend into gentle upland swells. 
The less precipitous surface of the country, giving rise to fewer tributary 
streams, renders the whole susceptible of cultivation. 

Penetrating this country to a point where Mud creek intersects the plain, 
Tim F. Hersey, who possessed the elements of a successful frontiersman — 
courage, endurance, and natural sagacity — in 1858 drove his stakes on the 



296 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

banks of that stream, and rightly conjectured that its situation and topo- 
graphical surroundings marked it as the natural center of a future prosperous 
community. With ox teams and stage coaches as the medium of transpor- 
tation in those days, Abilene appeared as a remote speck upon a very distant 
horizon. The vast country about remained for years a blank, and the vil- 
lage a mere stage station where the "last square meal" was served to passen- 
gers to the mountain regions. 

Its development came later. First, the cowboy with his immense herds 
and ceaseless brawls; then, the land agent with his fertile methods of ad- 
vertising, and Abilene and its surroundings were launched upon a career 
of unchecked growth and prosperity. The history of this transformation 
of a stretch of raw prairie into productive fields and beautiful town belongs 
to a later period than to which this narrative relates. 

The site of the present city of Salina was selected long before any settle- 
ment had reached that far west. The selection was made by Colonel Wil- 
liam A. Phillips, in 1857. The location of a town-site at that early period 
in a region so remote and wild was a sure indication of strong faith in the 
future of Kansas, and the exercise of a prescient sagacity, as the sequel has 
proven. Colonel Phillips at that time had seen more of Kansas than any 
other man in it. As the Kansas correspondent of the New York Tribune 
he was present in every convention and assembly met to discuss and decide 
upon measures affecting the welfare and destiny of the State. His earnest 
appeals to the North on behalf of the Free-State cause rang through the 
columns of that great newspaper, and brought thousands to the rescue of 
Kansas from the grasp of the slave-power. He had inspected with a prac- 
tical eye every portion of Kansas then known to the settler, and much that 
no settler's foot had ever trod. He selected his site for the future city in 
the midst of a great plain, at a point where the Smoky Hill river makes a 
great sweep to the south, leaving an unbroken stretch of level fertile land 
for twenty miles in that direction, reaching out fourteen miles to a natural 
divide on the west, and at the most convenient point of access to the great 
valley of the Saline river. Its natural advantages were marked, and it 
needed but the settlement of the surrounding country to secure to Salina a 
rapid and prosperous growth. 

Those who establish town-sites in an undeveloped country are chargeable 
with considerable responsibility. They may allure capital for a time into 
unprofitable investments, and by selecting inconvenient locations, subject 
communities to expensive burdens in the transaction of their business, and 
these evils are only finally corrected after sacrifice and loss. 

In February, 1858, the town-site was surveyed and platted, and subse- 
quently a charter was obtained and a town company organized in 1859, of 
which Col. Phillips was president, his associates being A. M. Campbell, A. 
C. Spillman, Robert Crawford and James Muir, to whom was afterwards 
added Rev. Wm. Bishop, R. H. Bishop, and R. Calkins. 



Sixth biennial Report. 297 

Salina remained the frontier settlement in that part of Kansas up to 1865, 
and later. When selected it was an Indian and buffalo region. It is sin- 
gular that it escaped being raided by Indians during the earlier portion of 
its history. As late as 1862 an Indian raid was attempted, and several 
ranchmen west of the town were killed. Others, escaping, raised an alarm 
among the settlers, who immediately organized and prepared for defense. 
In September of the same year the inhabitants were surprised by a party 
of bushwhackers, who loaded themselves with plunder and rode away, in- 
flicting no other injuries. Saline county made very slow progress in settle- 
ment up to 1867. In the spring of that year the Kansas Pacific road 
reached there; from this time the settlement was rapid and the town entered 
upon a career of solid growth and prosperity. 

In this brief and rapid review I have necessarily passed without mention 
many incidents and events of local interest. I could not stop to narrate the 
useful and honorable part which many prominent citizens from this section 
of the State took in public affairs. Nor the great number of town-sites 
selected and platted, the stakes marking the boundaries of which were con- 
sumed by prairie fires, and their distinguishing features lost to history. For 
in that early time the sight of the future metropolis of the West was sought 
for with infinitely more diligence than wisdom. When Horace Greeley 
passed through Kansas in 1859 he thought too much good land was wasted 
in town-sites, which in their turn harbored too much dormant muscle, and he 
advised the people to get back into the country and raise potatoes. Kan- 
sas, however, never was much of a potato State. 



298 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



SURVEY OF KANSAS INDIAN LANDS. 



[ Read at the annual meeting of the State Historical Society, Jan. 15, 1889, by John 
C. McCoy, of Kansas City, Mo.] 

Prior to sixty years ago Dearly the whole of the territory now embraced 
within the limits of Kansas was in possession of the two tribes of Indians 
known as the Kansas tribe and the Osages. These had from time immemo- 
rial occupied this region. In 1825 the United States Government made 
treaties with these two tribes, with a view of diminishing their possessions 
and preparing a portion of their territory for the occupancy of the rem- 
nants of Indian tribes within the Mississippi Valley. The progress of set- 
tlements within the States west of the Alleghanies demanded that the 
remaining lands occupied by the Indians in the settled States and Terri- 
tories should be opened to settlement, and the Indians themselves placed 
beyond contiguity with the whites. 

Missionaries had long been among those eastern tribes. Among the 
devoted men who had been thus engaged, was Rev. Isaac McCoy. He had 
labored with zeal, and with more or less success, in Indiana and Michigan ; 
but the success which had crowned his efforts when the settlements were 
remote from his missionary stations were greatly lessened as the homes 
of the settlers became intermingled with those of the Indians. He it was, 
more than any other person, who besought the Government to remove the 
Indians to the far West. By the year 1830 the work of removal began. 
Mr. McCoy was made the agent of the Government for the removal of the 
tribes, and in selecting their locations. With him was associated in that 
work his son John C. McCoy, who in this paper gives an account of work 
relating to the colonization of Kansas sixty years ago. 

Mr. McCoy traversed our plains long before they were inhabited by 
white men. Western Missouri was but a sparsely-settled frontier region. 
Kansas City and St. Josej)h had no existence. Mr. McCoy was one of the 
founders of Kansas City, and was at the time this paper was read the only 
survivor of the original town proprietors. He had lived to see a city of 
150,000 inhabitants where was naught but timbered hills and forbidding 
gorges. He had seen a State of a million and a half of prosperous people 
grow up in a territory which he helped to assign to the intended perpetual 
occupancy of the red man. His presence before our Historical Society was 
a remarkable illustration of growth and progress in the history of?)ur coun- 
try. He had continued to live in Kansas, and on the Kansas border, from 
the date of his first coming West. He was at the time of his attendance at 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 299 

this meeting in apparently good health. In the following spring his health 
began to fail, and he died at his home in Kansas City, on the 2d day of 
September, 1889. He was born at Vincennes, Indiana, on the 28th day of 
September, 1811, and was therefore almost seventy-eight years old at the 
time of his death. He had been a member of our Kansas State Historical 
Society almost from the beginning, and for several years was a member of 
the Board of Directors. He was a large contributor to the library of the 
Society. The manuscripts of his own, and of those so carefully made up by 
his father and scrupulously preserved by the son, and finally deposited by 
him in the collections of our Society, are of inestimable value. 

Nearly a year ago in response to a request conveyed in a resolution 
adopted at the last annual meeting of the State Historical Society of Kan- 
sas, and at the urgent solicitation of Judge Adams, the worthy Secretary, I 
consented to try to prepare the paper here presented, and have it ready for 
this annual meeting. I have undertaken to give my personal recollections 
of events which transpired upon the wild wilderness stage in this far West 
region, and especially those relating to the immigrant tribes of Indians 
which removed to and remained within the limits of Kansas during a period 
of about forty-five years, from 1829 to about 1875, when, with only a few 
individual exceptions, the last of the race, both immigrant and indigenous, 
had left for their present new homes in the Indian Territory. I found very 
soon after commencing my task that I had undertaken what was impossible 
to accomplish from memory unaided by records and reference data, to be 
found only in the archives of the State Historical Society at Topeka; and 
although frequently prompted by your Secretary, the Avork was delayed un- 
til a very short time before the meeting. Much of the labor and research 
and verification of data and facts from records in the paper now presented, 
is the work of Secretary Adams, and to him is largely due the credit if any 
there be for this contribution to the historic records of Kansas and the old 
far West. The chief agency I have had in its preparation has been to fur- 
nish such incidents and explanations of facts worthy of historic record as 
might illustrate and add to the completeness of authentic history. If after a 
lapse of more than half a century these personal recollections of the ear- 
liest periods in the history of the now great and prosperous State of Kan- 
sas, and which a kind Providence has enabled me to retain with clear and 
undiminished distinctness, should in any measure promote the mission of 
your worthy Society, I will be amply rewarded. 

By the act of May 26th, 1830, Congress provided for establishing the In- 
dian Territory, The terms of the act authorized the President to select a 
portion of the territory of the United States west of the States of Arkansas 
and Missouri, and west of the Territory of Iowa, to which the Indian title 
had been extinguished, to be divided into a suitable number of districts for 
the reception of such tribes of Indians as might choose to exchange the 
lands where they then resided, in the States to the eastward of the Missis- 

—20 



300 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

sippi, and remove to such new territory. It was provided that such new 
districts should be surveyed and marked out so as to be easily distinguished 
from each other. 

My father, the Rev. Isaac McCoy, was assigned to the duty of making se- 
lections for the tribes removed under this act, and of surveying and mark- 
ing out the several districts of lands selected. He had been largely 
instrumental in securing the passage of the act of Congress which established 
the Indian Territory. He had a friendly understanding with several of 
the tribes which were to remove, having long been a missionary among 
them. He had in 1828 visited the Territory with delegations of the tribes 
to make explorations, and to gather information as to the character of the 
country, and its suitableness for inhabitancy. With President Jackson, 
and the officers of the Indian Department, he had had many conferences 
upon the subject of this new change in Indian affiiirs. These circumstances 
led to his selection for the work of aiding in establishing the emigrant In- 
dians in their new homes. In anticipation of the passage of the act he had 
removed his family, in September, 1829, from the missionary station, where 
he had long resided, on the St. Joseph river in Michigan, to the town of 
Fayette, Missouri, the most suitable place for their temporary residence. I 
joined the family at that place in the fall of that year. 

I was at that time eighteen years of age. From almost the day of my 
birth my father had lived with his family in the Indian country. The pri- 
mary education I received was derived from parental instruction, and the 
aid of missionary teachers. Afterwards I went from home to attend school ; 
and was at different times at school at Troy, at Franklin, and at Miami 
University in Ohio, and at Transylvania University at Lexington, Kentucky. 
In view of prospective work in the Indian Territory, I had, in my studies, 
given attention to the subject of practical surveying. In the work of sur- 
veying the lands assigned to the various tribes, I assisted my father from the 
beginning, and of later surveys I had entire charge. 

With the following surveys I was connected, either as assistant or chief 
surveyor, under instructions from the War Department, or Superintendent 
of Indian Affairs: 

1. Survey of the western boundary-line of the Delaware lands, in Septem- 
ber, 1830. 

2. Survey of the northern boundary of the Delaware lands, and of the 
military reservation at Fort Leavenworth, in October, 1830. 

3. Survey in 1831, of a small tract of about thirteen by thirty miles, west 
of, and near the southwest corner of the State of Missouri, for the mixed 
band of Shawnees and Senecas. 

4. Survey in 1831, of the meanders of the Arkansas river from a point 
near the mouth of the Verdigris to about five miles above the mouth of the 
Red Fork, about eighty-five miles from the point of beginning. 

5. In 1832 a tract of six miles square adjoining and south of the Peoria 



Sixth bienxial repobt. 301 

and Kaskaskia lands, which tract was designed to be for a seat of govern- 
ment for all the tribes of the new Indian Territory; upon which was to be 
located a great council-house with ample grazing-grounds adjacent for the 
ponies of the delegates in attendance at the annual and called meetings of 
the body politic of the tribes, to make laws for their common good, to pro- 
mote peaceful and friendly relations between the tribes, and for their in- 
struction and aid in acquiring a knowledge of the arts and blessings of a 
Christian civilization. 

6. In 1832 the lands of the Ottawas. 

7. The same year, the lands of the Chippewas. 

8. In 1833, commencing July 29th, the survey of the boundary-lines of 
the Peorias, Kaskaskias, Weas, and Piankashaws. 

9. In September, 1833, the survey of the southern and western lines of 
the Shawnee lands. 

10. In December, 1833, the survey of the boundary-lines of the Kickapoo 
lands. 

11. Survey in the spring of 1836, of the western boundary of the State of 
Missouri, from the southwest corner to a point eighty-two miles south from 
the mouth of the Kansas river, the point being due east of the northeast 
corner of the Osage lands. 

12. Survey, commencing May 25, 1836, of the northern boundary-line of 
the Osage lands from the northeast corner to the Arkansas river. 

13. Survey of the northern boundary-line of the lands of the Kansas 
Indians in July, 1836. 

14. Survey in 1837, of the south, the west, and the north lines of the 
land now known as the "Cherokee strip," extending west to longitude 100° 
west from Greenwich, the south line being between the lands of the Creeks 
and the Cherokees, and the north line between the Cherokee and the Osage 
reservations. 

15. Also in 1837, a tract south of the Pottawatomies and north of Fort 
Scott, for the Kew York Indians, to which land only a few of the New 
York Indians ever came, and which they finally refused to accept. 

16. In 1838, in conjunction with Capt. Hood of the U. S. Topographical 
Engineers, the western boundary of the State of Missouri from the mouth 
of the Kansas river to a point about forty miles south. 

17. In 1839, the lands of the half-breed Sauks, Foxes, and lowas of Mis- 
souri, between the Nemaha rivers and on the Missouri river. 

18. In 1845, thirty-nine sections for the Wyandotte Indians. 

19. Survey at different times between the years 1833 and 1845, of the 
meanders of the Missouri river from the mouth of the Kansas river to the 
mouth of the Little Nemaha. 

20. The lands of the Sauks and the Foxes of Illinois, on the Marais des 
Cygnes, in 1854 or 1855. 



302 State Histobical society. 

21. In 1854 or 1855, a re-survey and curtailment of the military reserva- 
tion at Fort Leavenworth. 

22. In 1854 or 1855, survey of the town-site of Leavenworth city. This 
survey was made at the same time of the re-survey of the military reserva- 
tion. 

W^E&TERN DELAWARE BOUNDARY-LINE. 

If I were to try to give on this occasion anything like detailed accounts 
of the work of all these surveying expeditions, it would weary your patience. 
I shall therefore now only speak somewhat in detail of some of the circum- 
stances and incidents of two or three of these surveys. 

The survey of the western boundary-line of the Delaware lands was 
commenced on the 6th of September, 1830. The starting-point was on the 
Kansas river, where the eastern boundary-line of the reservation of the 
Kansas tribe, or Kaws, crossed the river. That initial point was two or 
three miles above where the city of Topeka, the capital of the State of 
Kansas, now stands. The Kansas tribe had, by treaty of 1825, given up to 
the United States all their claim to lands, except to a strip thirty miles 
wide, lying on both sides of the Kansas river, and extending westward of 
the point I have named, to the buffalo plains. The southern boundary of 
their reservation and that portion of the eastern boundary south of the 
Kansas river had been in 1827 surveyed by Maj. Angus L. Langham, a 
brother of Elias Langham, who was Surveyor General of Missouri at a 
very early day. 

Our surveying party consisted of Isaac McCoy, Government Commis- 
sioner, in charge. Dr. Rice McCoy, surveyor, myself as assistant, Congreve 
Jackson, afterwards Lieutenant-Colonel in Doniphan's regiment in its cele- 
brated march through Mexico in the Mexican war, and Albert Dickens, 
chain men, and three employes, and Johnny Quick, a Delaware chief, and 
James Conner, sent by the tribe as interpreter, to witness the survey. We 
also had two other interpreters, one for the Kaws, named Joe Jim, and 
another named Pierish, for the Pawnees. 

Our party started out from Fayette, Missouri, fitted out with pack-horses 
carrying all camp equipage, except some tents procured at Fort Leaven- 
worth. We passed up to Chouteau's trading-house on the south side of the 
Kansas river, about seven miles above the mouth, and crossing there passed 
on to Fort Leavenworth. There we were furnished with fifteen infantry 
soldiers to act as guards and laborers, with tents and camp supplies. 

On our way to Cantonment Leavenworth to procure our escort and sup- 
plies, we passed the Shawnee council-house, which was a few miles out from 
the Missouri State line, south of the Kansas river. There we found a com- 
pany of thirty-five Kaw Indians engaged in a council with the Shawnees. 
The latter invited my father to attend the council. This he was glad to 
do, as our work would lead us near the Kaw villages, and it was necessary 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 303 

that my father should give some explanation of his design in surveying in 
order to avoid exciting their jealousy and exposing us to danger. 

There was another ground for precautionary measures. The Kaws and 
Pawnees were hereditary enemies, and at this time were at war, or, perhaps 
more correctly speaking, in their never-ending contest to ascertain which 
could steal the most horses and scalps from the other. A party of the 
Kaws had recently stolen nine horses from the Pawnees, and two other par- 
ties were at this very time out on like expeditions. As much of our work 
lay between these two tribes, we were liable to find ourselves between two 
fires as it were. AVe had reason to fear that if the Kaws should not suc- 
ceed to their satisfaction in their descent upon the Pawnees, they might en- 
deavor to make up for their lack of plunder from our party; and if they 
should succeed in their incursion upon the Pawnees, the latter might follow 
them, and be led on to us with a like disposition to make up for their losses. 
In view of our possible danger from the Pawnees, at the request of my 
father. Major John Dougherty, their agent, had the goodness to send an ex- 
press to invite their chiefs in to a council at Fort Leavenworth. This pre- 
caution was the more necessary, as our surveying expedition would take us 
far out upon that portion of the buflTalo plains frequented by the Pawnees 
in their hunting excursions. Indeed, we were to pass through a portion of 
the Republican valley not very far from where the Pawnees long had a 
permanent village, the seat of the Pawnee Republic, and which they had 
but a few years previous to the time of which I am speaking, abandoned ; 
removing to the Platte valley in Nebraska. 

Major Dougherty appointed a council with the Pawnee chiefs, to be held 
at Fort Leavenworth on the 24th of September, 1830. 

At this time the Kaw agency was at a point on the north side of the 
Kansas river opposite Horse Shoe Lake, about eight miles above 
Lawrence, and near where Williamstown now is, on the Kansas Pacific 
Railroad. Maj. John Dougherty accompanied our party from Fort Leav- 
enworth as far as the agency. Reaching that point, another council with 
the Kaws was held, and our mission was explained to White Plume, or 
Nom-pa-war-ra, who was the great chief of the Kaws at that time. To the 
best of my recollection. White Plume sent with us one of his head-men be- 
sides Joe Jim, his interpreter. 

One of the soldiers, named Rash, was detailed as hunter, and he kept the 
party amply supplied with game, which was abundant. His skill was un- 
erring, and one day he brought into camp five deer-hides. My father, how- 
ever, forbade the wanton destruction of the wild animals. One evening, on 
going into camp near Stranger creek on our way out, less than twenty 
miles from Cantonment Leavenworth, a herd of elk, estimated to number 
two or three hundred, was encountered, and several killed. I mention this 
fact to show how abundant was wild game in Kansas at that early period. 
Capt. Martin, in 1818, camped for the winter with three companies of U. S. 



304 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

riflemen on Cow Island, ten miles above Leavenworth, and during that 
winter killed between two and three thousand deer, besides great numbers 
of bears, turkeys, etc. "While on our surveying expedition Chief Quick and 
Interpreter Conner, of the Delawares, went out on a hunt one day and lost 
their reckoning. After three or four days' wandering they finally found 
their way into the fort, where we found them a week or so afterwards. 

Having found our initial point, as established by Major Langham, on 
the north side of the Kansas river, just above where Topeka now is, as I 
have mentioned, we started out September 6th, 1830, and passed northward 
to the northern line of the Delaware outlet. Here we raised a mound ten 
feet square at the base and seven feet high, under which we deposited 
pieces of granite boulder, flint and chert, and what appeared to us to be 
iron ore, which we found near the place. This mound was placed in bot- 
tom land, on the south side of Spring creek, very near to where the town of 
Eureka, in Jackson county, was located after the settlement of Kansas was 
begun. 

The Delaware outlet was a strip of land given by the Government to the 
Delawares, ten miles wide, and extending from the northwest corner of the 
Delaware lands proper, westward to the buffalo plains. Having established 
the western line and the point at the northwest corner of the Delaware 
lands, it was our next work to run a random line eastward, or rather south- 
eastward, to the Missouri river at Cantonment Leavenworth, near which 
post it had been determined by the treaty the northeast corner of the Dela- 
ware land should be; or, in other words, the extent to which these lands 
should reach northward on the Missouri river. The distance from our 
northwest corner to Fort Leavenworth we found to be forty-five miles and 
a fraction. 

We reached the Missouri river, near the fort, September 24th, and on 
that day was held the council with the Pawnees which had been appointed 
by Major Dougherty. The Pawnees were told by my father that we were 
surveying the lands of the Delawares, but they were not told that we were 
to pass out upon their hunting-grounds, because their knowledge of that fact 
might have exposed us to danger from them. 

The boundaries of the military reservation at Fort Leavenworth had 
not up to this time been defined, and no treaty, law, or instructions pointed 
out my father's duty in reference to the boundaries of such reservation. 
But upon consultation with the oflicers at the fort, it was determined that 
a survey of such boundaries should be made at this time. This we ac- 
cordingly did, and the report of his action to the War Department was 
approved. 

Having established the southeast corner of the military reservation on 
the Missouri river, on the first of October we surveyed the southern line 
of the reservation, running four miles due westward, and there marked the 
southwest comer, near Salt creek. 



Sixth Biennial Eepobt. 305 

Having completed the survey of the military reservation, we were now 
prepared to resume our Delaware survey and to mark out the Delaware out- 
let to the plains. Starting from the southwest corner of the military reser- 
vation, we retraced our north line of the Delaware land to the point which we 
had established at the northwest corner of their lands proper. Twelve miles 
out from the military reservation we reached 0-keet-sha, or Stranger creek. 
This name we found to be tliat by which it was called by the Kansas In- 
dians, the word 0-keet-sha meaning "stranger." On the 11th of October 
we reached a stream thirty-four and one-half miles from the military reser- 
vation, which the Indians called Nesh-cosh-cosh-che-ba, or Swallow river, 
seventy-six links wide, about which there was large timber. Another mode 
of rendering the sounds of this Indian name of this river is Nach-uch-u- 
te-be, and this is the orthography given on the map which we made of the 
Delaware reservation. The stream was also called Sautrelle river, and also 
Martin's river, in 1830. In the field-notes of our survey it is given as Nesh- 
cosh-cosh-che-ba. 

On the 13th of October we reached the mound which we had placed at 
the northwest corner of the Delaware land on the 18th of September, just 
a month previous to the closing of this retraced line. The course of this 
line was northwestwardly from Cantonment Leavenworth, in order to reach 
a point ten miles north of the northeast corner of the Kansas reservation 
for the opening of the ten-mile-wide Delaware outlet, which was to pass 
westward along the northern boundary of the Kansas reservation. To es- 
tablish the northern boundary of the outlet was our next duty. 

delawapvp: outlet supjvey. 

On the 15th of October, 1830, our party set out on a survey of the north- 
ern boundary-line of the Delaware outlet, passing from the point we had 
established as the northwest point of the Delaware reservation, due west- 
ward one hundred and fifty miles to near the forks of the Solomon. We 
reached the Big Blue on the 22d of October. This stream the Kansas 
Indians called Mon-e-ca-to, or Blue Earth river. This we reached at a point 
forty-five and a half miles from our starting-point, or ninety miles from 
Cantonment Leavenworth. Some eighteen miles further west we first saw 
the ferruginous sandstone hills on the divide between the Blue and the 
Republican. 

On the 29th of October we reached the Republican, one hundred and 
thirty-four miles from Cantonment Leavenworth. This stream was called 
by the Kansas Indians Pa-ne-ne-tah, or Pawnee river. This river was 
twelve chains wide where we reached it, at a point near the present town 
of Clifton, in Washington county. Crossing to the south side, our course 
took us past near the present site of the town of Concordia. 

The terminus of our line, one hundred and fifty miles west of the initial 
points, was in what are now the limits of Smith county, on the top of a 



306 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

ridge west of Oak creek, not many miles from the present town of Cawker 
City. From this point, the Ne-pa-hol-la, or Solomon river, was plainly seen 
coming from the northwest and west. Limestone cliifs prevailed to the 
northeast, the land being hilly and broken to the northwest, with prairie 
bottom stretching away to the northwest and west. 

SURVEY OF SHAW^NEE LANDS. 

In 1833 my father also received instructions from General Clark to 
establish a part of the southern boundary-line, and the western line of the 
Shawnee lands. A portion of the southern boundary had been established 
by Major Laugham, in 1828. 

On Wednesday, September 18, 1833, we commenced our survey at the 
20th milestone on the southern boundary of these lands, as established by 
Maj. Langham, and proceeded thence west, having first retraced Maj. Lang- 
ham's line from the west line of Missouri, he having placed monuments at 
distances of five miles so far as he had gone. In our survey we placed 
monuments at every mile. 

On Thursday, September 19th, at thirty miles from the Missouri line, we 
reached the northwest corner of the Peoria and Kaskaskia lands as estab- 
lished by Maj. Langham in 1828, and the northeast corner of the Ottawa 
lands as established by my father in 1832. Our survey of the Peoria and 
Kaskaskia lands in 1833 was for the purpose of marking the eastern, south- 
ern and part of the western boundaries of these lands, which had not been 
marked by Maj. Langhara's survey of these lands in 1828, nor by the sur- 
vey made by my father of the Ottawa lands in 1832. 

On Friday, September 20th, we proceeded from our encampment to the 
northwest corner of the Ottawa lands, the lines of which, surveyed the year 
before, were plainly marked. Our course for nearly the entire distance 
westward, one hundred and twenty miles from the Missouri State line, was 
across the northern branches of the Marais des Cygnes river. We observed 
and in our notes made record of the face of the country, character of soil, 
etc., noting prairie, timber, streams, and rock. 

On Thursday, September 26, we reached Major Langhara's sixtieth mile 
monument. Here we turned to the northward to strike the southeast cor- 
ner of the Kansas reservation, for the purpose of ascertaining the situation 
of the Shawnee lands at this place. The fourth mile north brought us to 
the Santa Fe road, bearing east and west on a high prairie ridge. The 
reaching of this great thoroughfare excited a lively interest in the minds of 
all. We were sixty miles from civilization, and on the only line of com- 
merce yet established for the exchange of the commodities of the United 
States for those of Spanish America, and the purchase and sale of the same 
for gold and silver. It was then but eleven years since trade had com- 
menced to pass over this route. 

The nineteenth mile to the northward brought us, September 28th, to the 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 307 

southeast corner of the Kansas reservation. We encamped to the north of 
the corner, on the Shunganunga creek, within four miles of the Kansas river 
and near Burnett's Mound. On Monday, September 30th, we returned 
south eight miles, and October 1st reached our sixtieth mile mound, on the 
southern Shawnee boundary, and thence proceeded westward with our 
survey. 

At eighty-one miles from the Missouri line we reached the Santa Fe road 
again, crossing it on high rolling prairie. 

On Tuesday, October 8th, we reached a point one hundred miles from the 
State of Missouri, and placed a monument on which was engraved "S. L. 
100 M." The monument was set on a point of hills near a small brook 
coursing southw^ardly, on the banks of which there was considerable timber, 
being waters of the Neosho river. 

Wednesday, October 9th, at a distance of 104 miles from the Missouri 
line, we crossed a large creek two chains and twenty-five links wide, cours- 
ing south, which we supposed to be the Council Grove creek, and which 
we understood at that time to be the main branch of the Marais des Cygnes, 
though really the main Neosho. On our map of this survey this stream 
and all others running southward are marked as tributaries of the Marais 
des Cygnes, but this stream, and doubtless some of the others, were really 
tributaries of the Neosho. The stream forked tw^o miles to the north w^est 
of where we crossed it, one branch heading north, and the other northwest. 
There were large timbered bottoms above and below, with fertile and ex- 
tensive bottom prairies. After crossing we proceeded over poor flint hills. 

Thursday, October 10th, w^e reached the 120-mile point from Missouri, 
and there established the southw^est corner of the Shawnee lands, by erect- 
ing a mound of earth eight feet square at the base, and five and a half feet 
high, on level prairie inclining somewhat to the southwest, there being in 
view, about one-fourth mile to the west, a creek, bearing northwest and 
north, some timber being seen on it to the northwest. We inserted in the 
mound a flat rock bearing northwest and southeast. On the northwest side 
we marked "120 M." Having placed other rocks east one chain and north 
one chain, we proceeded thence north to establish the western boundary of 
the Shawnee lands. 

Passing northward after crossing several smaller streams, at the distance 
of six and a fourth miles, we crossed a creek one chain wide, coursing east 
one-fourth mile, then a little east of north for three or four miles. This 
stream had some timber on it. At eight and a half miles this stream re- 
ceived another from the southeast, having some timber on it, and steep, 
rocky banks. Other small streams were crossed, when, at seventeen miles, 
a large creek was reached, three chains wide, coursing northeast, with some 
timber and brush. At about seventeen and three-fourths miles we reached 
this creek again, coursing northwest, two and a half chains wide, and having 
timber on the south. Crossing, we entered prairie on the north bank. At 



308 State Histobical Society. 

eighteen and a half miles we placed a rock for a monument in a bayou of 
the Smoky Hill river, bearing northwest and southeast, and the same for 
eighteen and three-fourths miles. 

At about nineteen miles from the southwest corner of the Shawnee lands 
we reached the Smoky Hill river, where there was some oak and cotton- 
wood timber. There we established the northwest corner of the Shawnee 
lands by setting in the ground a flat rock, three feet long by two feet wide, 
with other rocks to the south and east at the distance of one chain. In a 
small oak tree near this corner-stone was an auger-hole, which had been 
bored many years before, and in which a leather string was tied. To the 
westward along the Smoky Hill, there was considerable bottom land, with 
some timber, principally cottonwood. 

The creek last mentioned entered the river about one-fourth mile above 
the corner which we established. October 12th we made our camp on this 
creek. By reason of the fact that we crossed it twice in running our line, and 
that it entered the river so near the terminus of the line, we named it Line 
creek. I have supposed the creek now known as Lyons creek, in Davis 
county, to be the same. 

October 13, 1833, we started home, down the valley of the Kansas, on 
the south side, reaching Shawnee, Missouri, on the 18th. 

OSAGE SURVEY. 

On the 25th of May, 1836, I commenced the survey of the northern 
boundary of the Osage reservation, by order of General William Clark, 
Superintendent of Indian Affairs. The eastern boundary of this reserva- 
tion, and the southern as far as the Arkansas river, had been surveyed by 
Major A. L. Langham, in the year 1827 or 1828. Major Langham had 
been interrupted in his work by the hostility of the Osages, and his lines 
had been left incomplete. 

From time immemorial the Osages had been known as restless, trouble- 
some outlaws, not particularly dangerous to life, but decidedly so to prop- 
erty of any kind, especially horses which fell in their way. They neither 
knew nor wanted to know where the lines of their reservation ran, and when 
they saw the lines of demarkation being drawn so near them, they deter- 
mined to prevent Major Langham from defining any limits. While in 
camp writing one day, a large party of naked, painted, yelling Osages came 
suddenly upon a colored employ^, who happened to be some distance from 
camp. He of course broke toward camp, but the yelling savages were with 
him notwithstanding, administering blows with ramrods, bows, and other 
missiles, in a ceaseless torrent at every jump. At camp they made no halt, 
but in a solid phalanx dashed through, trampling down tents and camp 
fixtures; and the Major with his writing apparatus was rolled to the 
ground. Then the savages wound up the demonstration with an im- 
promptu war dance, and an emphatic demand for the surveyor and his 



Sixth Biexxial Repobt. 309 

party to vamose, with which command they complied with alacrity. In 
consequence of this interruption of Major Langham's survey, thus leaving 
his work incomplete, my survey of 1836 became necessary. My survey 
commenced at the point where Major Langham had established the north- 
east corner of the Osage reservation, in accordance with the treaty of 1825, 
about 26 miles west from the Missouri State line. The terms of the treaty 
provided that this point should be five miles east and ten miles north of 
White Hair's old village, and Major Langham placed this corner of this 
reservation accordingly. This point also became the northwest corner of 
the Cherokee neutral lands. 

At a point nearly thirty-one miles west we reached the Neosho river, 
about three or four miles above the village of the Little Osages. Between 
forty and fifty miles out, we crossed several main tributaries of the east fork 
of the Verdigris river. At sixty-one miles we crossed the west fork of the 
Verdigris. 

At ninety-six we reached a tributary of the Arkansas river, then known 
as Little Neosho river, and at 104 miles we reached a stream then called 
the Little Verdigris river, also a tributary of the Arkansas. Our line 
crossed the Little Arkansas about a mile and a half before we reached the 
main Arkansas, and about five miles above the confluence of the Little Ar- 
kansas with the main stream. This was 124 miles from the point of begin- 
ning. Our line terminated opposite an island covered with cottonwoods, 
near the west bank of the Arkansas river. 

An incident in my own experience in this survey of the Osage reserva- 
tion line similar to that related of Major Langham, I will here mention. 
Like him, I had no military escort. My company was composed of seven 
or eight poorly-armed men. The jar I had with the Osages arose from the 
fact that their north line, which I was running, crossed the Neosho only 
about three miles above the chief town of the Little Osages, numbering at 
this time about one thousand souls. This line curtailed their tribal limits 
much more than they had anticipated. From time out of mind the Osages 
and the Kaws were almost the sole occupants of the vast region extending 
from the Mississippi river between the Missouri and Arkansas indefinitely. 
With their vague ideas of land rights, dimensions, and treaty obligations, 
no wonder that they were reluctant to have the limits to their possessory 
land rights defined by the surveyor's compass. Many miles before I reached 
the river Neosho we were met by numbers of their young men on horse- 
back. At these times only the usual courtesies were given which were com- 
monly exchanged between the Woh-soh-she (Osages) and the Moh he-ton-ga 
(Americans), namely: first, an emphatic "How?" from each party; and 
secondly, an urgent request from the Indians for tobacco, or anything else 
in sight. We were liberal with our tobacco in the instances here mentioned, 
so much so that members of our party were left a short supply of the article. 
Before reaching the camp near the Neosho I began to realize that there 



310 STATE HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 

was trouble ahead, for I was met with a protest against our further progress, 
and a request that I should go down to see the big chief To this latter I 
assented; and early in the morning after our arrival in the vicinity I 
moved my entire party to the river, as near the Indian town as practica- 
ble, under guidance of a few stalwart Indians who had remained with us 
all night, no doubt for the object of watching and reporting our movements. 

The town was situated on a high prairie hill a mile or so west of the Ne- 
osho, and fifteen or twenty miles up the river from White Hair's town. Alter 
crossing the river, the crowd of men, women, children and dogs gathered 
around us uncomfortably thick, and with a noticeable absence of politeness 
due to visiting strangers. I placed the pack-horses in a sharp bend of the 
river where there was a perpendicular bank. With one of my chain-bearers, 
Charles Findlay, I proceeded on horseback, escorted by our guides or guards, 
and made my way to the lodge of the big chief of the Little Osages. There 
we tied our horses to the door post of the royal residence, which was a struct- 
ure about one hundred feet long by twenty feet wide, constructed of bark 
over a frame-work of poles. This was in the center of a city of more than 
a hundred lodges, of smaller dimensions than that of the chief With com- 
pass under arm, and a formidable bunch of papers, the young representative 
of our young Republic entered the audience chamber of the great Ka-he-ga. 

The door was at one corner of the chief's lodge, and at the farther end sat 
his highness, a "sure-enough" big chief in size, weighing well-nigh, I esti- 
mated, three hundred pounds. Upon a raised platform which ran all around 
the lodge were crowded several hundred stalwart, naked savages, notables 
of the tribe. Our reception was decidedly cool, without a sign of recog- 
nition, with not even a friendly " How ? " By long intercourse with Indians 
I had acquired considerable proficiency in sign language. To my inquiry 
for an interpreter I received no response. After waiting awhile I opened 
proceedings by showing my compass and papers, exhibiting authority from 
the great chief at Washington for what I was doing, and stated finally that 
I should continue to run the line. My talk was given with a limited knowl- 
edge of the Osage language, and by the use of signs common to all western 
tribes of Indians. 

The chief then began to talk, and he talked both loud and fast. He said 
their line was away up north; that I should not run the line where I was 
running it; and he intimated by significant gestures with his hands in the 
vicinity of his topknot, that if I attempted to do so there would be a rais- 
ing of scalp-locks. I believed this to be only bluster, aimed to scare us 
back, or make us pay something for going on. I told him if we were 
stopped or molested, the soldiers, of whom these Indians had a wholesome 
dread, would come down and wipe them out. 

After spending an hour and a half with no results, Findlay and I took 
our departure, first expressing, as I left, my purpose to go on west, and the 
chief responding that if we did we would be struck by his young men. We 



Sixth Biennial repobt. 311 

found our horses at the door, with the tail of my horse completely denuded 
of hair. I was glad to get the horse, even with his corn-cob tail. Near the 
outskirts of the town a noise greeted us somewhat as if bedlam had broke 
loose. I conjectured it to be a ruse to scare us, or get us into trouble, and 
told Findlay not to look round, but to preserve a slow gait and dignified 
composure. But the noise apparently increasing and nearing us, I looked 
around to see a sea of heads moving towards us, and one head in the center 
higher than the rest. That head had a familiar look. We halted to see 
the outcome, and Bill Cantrell, one of the men left at the camp at the river, 
rode up on our bald-faced mare, escorted by near a thousand yelling, 
screeching, howling men, women, children, and dogs. Poor Cantrell's 
face was about as white as the bald face of the mare he rode. His teeth 
were so dry he could not get them together. "Why, what in the world are 
you doing here?" said I. In response, in dry sepulchral voice, he conveyed 
the pleasant intelligence that the boys at the river were all killed, and he 
alone had escaped to tell the tale. "Nonsense," said I. "These Indians 
dare not attempt to kill us, otherwise they could wipe us out in two min- 
utes." He declared, however, that he left the men and the Indians fighting 
at the camp with knives and clubs. I told him and Findlay to come on 
slowly, whilst I galloped down to ascertain the facts. I found the men and 
horses all safe, without an Indian in sight. Soon after I had left camp 
wdth Findlay, the Indians had made an effort to rob the outfit. But a few 
of the men showing fight, with knives, a few arms, and my Jacob's staft', 
they were routed without bloodshed, after a brief struggle. While this 
flurry was in progress, Cantrell and one other, both mounted on horses, 
crossed the river, and attempted to fly towards home. A company of 
mounted Osages pursued them, headed them off*, and drove them back 
across the river. 

We finished the survey to the Arkansas river without serious molestation. 
Some young fellows followed us for a day or two, but as we kept a close 
watch and guard, we were finally let alone. 

The field-notes of this survey, which are among the manuscript col- 
lections of your Historical Society, are signed "John C. McCoy, Surveyor," 
and to them is attached a certificate in the following words: "The fore- 
going, from one to fourteen, contains the field-notes of the survey of the 
northern boundary of the Osage lands, surveyed by John C. McCoy." 
Signed "Isaac McCoy." Dated "Westport, Jackson county, Mo., Sep- 
tember 16, 1836." 



312 State Historical Society. 



THE RESCUE OF DR. JOHN W. DOY. 



[A paper read by Maj. James B. Abbott, of De Soto, before the Kansas State Histor- 
ical Society, at the annual meeting, January 15, 1889.] 

In the long, bitter strife which had grown out of the settlement of Kan- 
sas, between the Free-State and Pro-Slavery elements, the slave was far from 
being the least interested party. He saw in the organization of a free State, 
so near, peopled by an aggressive and determined class of opposers of the 
peculiar institution, opportunities to escape from his bondage, and to place 
himself upon the line of possibilities for advancement and development, 
to which every man is of right entitled. 

He learned from the harangues of the Pro-Slavery leaders, the size, loca- 
tion, and political character of every village and town in the Territory, as 
well as the political character of the active men who inhabited them ; and 
thus he was early, but unintentionally, taught the places and men to shun, 
as well as the places and men to trust. 

When the master began to realize the danger he was in by attempting to 
hold thinking property in such close proximity to a live free State, the effort 
to remove said property farther south was naturally suggested and acted 
upon. This action on the part of the owners prompted the slave to make 
an effort to secure his freedom before the difficulties were increased and the 
opportunities were gone, and so it is not at all strange that hardly a week 
passed that some way-worn bondman did not find his way into Lawrence, 
the best advertised anti-slavery town in the world, and where the slave was 
sure to receive sympathy and encouragement, and was sent on his way re- 
joicing either by himself or with others, as the circumstances seemed to sug- 
gest was most wise. 

Frequent attempts were made, however, to kidnap these colored pilgrims 
and take them back to Missouri by slave-hunters from that State, assisted 
by some of the border-ruffians who still resided in the Territory, and free- 
born colored men were in no wise exempt from the efforts of these kid- 
nappers. 

In the winter of 1858 and 1859, Charles Fisher and Wm. Kiley (two 
free-born mulattoes) were kidnapped and carried off, but succeeded in 
making their escape, and came back to Lawrence. 

It was said that there was more money to the kidnapper in the free man 
than in the slave, because he only got a reward of $100 for the return of 
the slave, but for the free man he received one-half of what he could be 
sold for. 

This condition of things made it very unsafe and disagreeable for the 



Sixth bienxial Re fob t. 313 

colored residents of Lawrence, and as there were a few colored strangers in 
town, after consulting with some of the principal citizens it was decided to 
raise a sum of money to assist those who desired, to go to Iowa, and thus 
enable them to find their way into some safe locality where they could earn 
their living and be free from the danger and fear of being kidnapped. 

Rev. Ephraim Nute and Charles Stearns were selected to make the neces- 
sary arrangements to start the colored emigrants on their way. 

On the 18th of January, 1859, an arrangement was made with Dr. John 
Doy to take a party of colored persons as far as Holton. The party con- 
sisted of eight men, three women and two children, sixteen altogether, all 
of whom had free papers except Wilson Hays and Charles Smith, two col- 
ored men, who had been employed as cooks at the Eldridge House in the 
city of Lawrence, and were known to be free men. On the 25th of Jan- 
uary, everything being in readiness, the party started, crossed the Kansas 
river at Lawrence, and traveled about twelve miles from Lawrence in the 
direction of Oskaloosa. 

The colored men had been walking behind the wagons for an hour or 
more, and coming to a down-grade of considerable distance, they all got 
into two covered wagons which were already nearly full of camp equipage, 
and women and children. No precaution had been taken to put out ad- 
vance or rear guards or scouts, and they had traveled but a short distance, 
when they were surprised and halted by a body consisting of about twenty 
mounted armed men, and being in no condition to make a defense, were 
compelled to make an unconditional surrender; and when asked by the 
Doctor what authority they had for arresting them, were told, by their 
leader, ''Here is our authority," putting the muzzle of his revolver at the 
Doctor's head. 

Among the men recognized by Dr. Doy was Jake Hurd, a notorious kid- 
napper; Dr. Garvin, the Democratic postmaster at Lawrence; two brothers 
by the name of McGhee, and a man by the name of Whitley, who afterwards 
was known as Gen. AVhitley, and was a detective at the Treasury Depart- 
ment, Washington, where he gained some notoriety, if not honor. 

After a long parley, the whole party, consisting of the colored passengers. 
Dr. Doy, his son Charles, and a man by the name of Clough, were persuaded 
by promises of reward, threats and force of arms, to move on toward Weston, 
Missouri, where they arrived the following day, after enduring abuse and 
threats from as vulgar and foul-mouthed a band of ruffians as ever were 
congregated to do a mean and cruel act, for filthy lucre. 

After the arrival at Weston, the Doctor and his son Charles were ar- 
raigned and examined before a justice of the peace, or rather went through 
the farce of an examination, and were held and committed to the Platte 
county jail to await their trial on the charge of abducting slaves from Mis- 
souri, although they had never been in that State since they first passed 
into Kansas, which was in July, 1854. 



314 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Before the 20th of March, 1859, the day set for the trial, the Kansas 
Legislature had met and made an appropriation of $1,000 to defray the 
expense of the trial, and ex-Gov. Shannon and Attorney-General Davis, 
two distinguished Democratic lawyers of Kansas, were sent over to make 
the defense; but they found such a bitter prejudice against the prisoners 
that they decided to make an application for a change of venue, which the 
judge granted, and the Doctor and his son Charles were sent to St. Joseph 
for trial, heavily ironed. At the trial, which lasted three days, the jury 
did not agree, and were discharged on Sunday afternoon, and on Monday 
the prosecuting attorney entered a nolle prosequi in the case of Charles 
Doy, but the Doctor was bound over to take his trial at the adjourned term, 
June 20th, in the sum of $5,000; and although Doy's friends offered to 
furnish security in the sum of $20,000, in Kansas, yet no man dared to go 
on his bonds in Missouri — and so the Doctor was remanded to prison. 

On the second day of the adjourned term of the Circuit Court of Bu- 
chanan county, it being the 21st day of June, the Doctor's case was called, 
and although the proof was positive that Doy had nothing to do with the 
abduction of a slave, yet he was found guilty by the jury, and sentenced to 
serve five years in the penitentiary at hard labor; but upon demand the 
judge suspended the execution of the sentence until the opinion of the Su- 
preme Court could be obtained. 

There were still twelve other indictments pending, one for each of the 
other colored persons kidnapped in his company — Doy having been tried 
only for the abduction of a slave claimed by the Mayor of Weston. So it 
will be readily seen that whatever the opinion of the Supreme Court might 
be, Doy would still be in jeopardy, and have no assurance that he would 
be set at liberty. This condition of affairs was fully appreciated by his 
friends in Kansas, and especially by Messrs. Nute and Stearns, who, with- 
out due regard for fitness, had employed a man to perform a most danger- 
ous and responsible duty who was almost totally disqualified by the want of 
due caution, while all conceded him courage and loyalty to the cause of 
freedom. The result was, that not only Dr. Doy was now suffering, but 
all those who had been placed under his charge had been captured and re- 
turned to slavery, their hopes crushed, and their lives made more bitter and 
unbearable than if they had never made an attempt to obtain their liberty. 

The question uppermost in the minds of the justice-loving people of 
Lawrence and vicinity was, what ought to be done in the case of Dr. Doy, 
all legal means having been tried and failed ? 

They believed with the fathers, that all men were created equal, and 
endowed with the right of liberty, which right could not be forfeited, 
except by the perpetration of a crime ; that he who finds himself deprived 
of this right without just cause has not only the moral right, but it is his 
duty, not only to himself but to his race and all races, to make an effort to 
regain it, and to ask and demand of his friends that they shall help make 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 315 

his effort a success. Dr. Doy when asked for help had responded, and done 
the best he could. In so doing he had lost his own liberty, but not his 
right to liberty; and so the general verdict of the people was. Dr. Doy 
ought to be rescued and brought home to his family. 

On the 20th of July, 1859, and but five days before the opinion of the 
Supreme Court would decide the case of Dr. Doy, Mr. Stearns and Mr. 
Nute called at an early hour in the morning at my place of business in the 
city of Lawrence, and requested me to call at Mr. Stearns's store as soon as 
I could, as they wished to discuss a matter of great importance, that re- 
quired immediate attention. 

As soon as I could leave, I called at Mr. Stearns's store, and found him 
and Nute present, and Mr. Stearns commenced by saying: "It is generally 
known that it was through our instrumentality that Dr. Doy was placed in 
charge of the colored people who were kidnapped. His friends and his at- 
torneys believe if he is not rescued before, that next Monday will see Dr. 
Doy on his way to the penitentiary, there to remain at least five years, if he 
should live so long; and we feel especially called upon to make an earnest 
endeavor to secure his release before it is too late. We have carefully 
looked over the field, and have come to the conclusion to place the matter 
in your hands, and urge you to make up such an organization as you may 
deem suitable, to effect the Doctor's rescue, take charge of the expedition, 
and be on your way as soon as possible." 

I asked him if he had any plan to suggest by which he thought the ob- 
ject could be accomplished. His answer was, that the company should con- 
sist of about fifty Sharps-rifle men, and that a charge should be made at 
an early hour in the morning, break open the jail, and take Doy and hasten 
back to the river before the St. Joseph people had time to recover from 
their surprise. On further inquiry, I found that there was but about $30 
on hand with which to defray the expenses of the expedition — a sum too 
insignificant to consider, with which to defray the expenses of so large a 
party. Finally, after listening to the suggestions of the gentlemen for some 
time, this proposition was made to them : 

You must say to all who speak to you on this subject, that you have 
given up all hopes of a rescue, and will rely wholly upon obtaining a par- 
don from the Governor. I will try to find nine good men, and that I knoiv 
to be good, to join the party, and no man shall know the object of the or- 
ganization except those that go and yourselves. We will take the $30 
you have on hand, and the balance I will furnish if any more is needed. 
We will go to St. Joseph and carefully look the chances over, and if we find 
good grounds to believe that a rescue can be made without too great a loss, 
we will make the attempt, but if we believe the chances against us are too 
great, we will abandon the enterprise and come home. Whatever the result 
may be, I think now I can tell what the verdict of the people will be. If we 
come home without making an attempt, it will be said that we were cowards. 
—21 



316 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 

If we attempt and are destroyed, it will be said that we were fools. If we 
attempt and succeed, it will be said, well done. My hopes are, that with a 
small party, we may be able, by taking a prisoner to the jail in the night- 
time, to get possession of the building without raising an alarm. 

This proposition was accepted by Mr. Stearns and Mr. Nute, and it was 
understood that their lips were to be sealed on that subject until we re- 
turned. 

St. Joseph was then a city of nearly 11,000 inhabitants, composed largely 
of the most radical fire-eating Pro-Slavery men ; and a daily mail line was 
established between St. Joseph and Lawrence, and if it had been suspected 
in Lawrence that such an expedition was being fitted out, St. Joseph would 
have been duly notified ; and nicely-laid traps would have been set for us, 
before we arrived, and instead of a rescue of John Doy there would have 
been ten abolition hides nailed to the bulletin boards of St. Joseph. Hence 
the necessity for extreme caution, and particular attention to detail. 

By four o'clock of said day the party was organized ; and it consisted of 
the following named persons: Silas S. Soule, J. A. Pike, S. J. Willes, 
Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, Charles Doy, Jacob Sinex, J. E. Stew- 
art, George Hay, and James B. Abbott as captain. There were two two- 
horse wagons, the teams driven by their owners, Sinex and Simmons, and 
three saddle horses. The arms consisted of three sporting-rifles, about 
fifteen revolvers, five or six knives with blades from six to eighteen inches 
long, and a slung-shot of lead cast in an egg-shell. No Sharps rifles were 
permitted, as a Sharps rifle was a badge of a Kansas abolitionist, and if 
seen would excite suspicion. 

Mr. Stearns gave me a letter of introduction to Mr. D. W. Wilder, then 
a resident of Elwood, opposite St. Joseph, where our party was to meet, 
and not a member of the party had an acquaintance in Elwood or St. 
Joseph that they knew of. 

About five o'clock that evening I bade my wife good-bye, received an 
assurance from her that the Doctor would come back with us, and young 
Soule and myself mounted our horses and started quietly on our journey. 
After we had been gone a few hours and as night came on, the rest of the 
party moved out without attracting any attention, and so the starting of the 
expedition had been a success. 

On Friday morning we all arrived in Elwood in good health and heart, 
and in order to have some excuse for being often together, it was agreed 
that those who came in the wagons should hail from Pike's Peak, as that 
was the year of the great emigration to and from the New Eldorado of the 
Rockies. Of course the Pike's-Peak boys were disgusted with the result of 
their trip, and were anxious to sell their teams, wagons and outfits, and re- 
turn home; and some of us were anxious to buy them out, when we could 
buy cheap enough ; and thus was found an excuse for being together when- 
ever occasion required, without raising suspicion. After a somewhat late 



► 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 317 

breakfast I took my letter of introduction to the residence of Mr. Wilder, 
and to my great regret found that he had gone East. But it occurred to 
me that there was a Free-State paper published in St. Joseph, and taking 
Mr. Willes along, we crossed the Missouri river and soon found ourselves 
in the office and presence of Dr. Edwin H. Grant, the editor of the St. 
Joseph Democrat. I introduced myself to the Doctor by saying that I was 
passing through his city, and learned that there was a Free-State paper 
being published in this place; that I had a curiosity to see a Free-State 
paper that could be published in that portion of Missouri, and I had made 
up my mind to subscribe for it. The Doctor at once took my name, and 
when I gave him my address he remarked that there was a resident of Law- 
rence now confined in the St. Joseph jail. I inquired his name, and was 
told that it was Dr. John Doy. I informed the editor that I knew Dr. Doy 
quite well, and asked him the nature of the offense for which he was im- 
prisoned. He then gave me a history of Dr. Doy's case, and declared in a 
most impassioned and impressive manner that Doy had been outraged, from 
the time of his arrest upon the charge of kidnapping, through the trial to the 
sentence, and that it was a wonder to the Free-State people in Missouri that 
the Kansas boys had not, before this, taken Doy out of jail and carried him 
home. He told us further, that he was in the habit of visiting Doy in his 
cell as often as once a week, to take him papers from among his exchanges. 

When I became satisfied of Grant's reliability, I told him the object of 
our visit, and made known to him our plans. He at once offered to join 
our force with all his employes, assuring us that every man in his office 
would be as true as steel to the cause. We thanked him for his offer, but 
told him that while we should need information in the execution of our 
plans, which he could more safely and readily acquire than we, being 
strangers, yet we could not permit him to jeopardize his life or his prop- 
erty by taking a hand in the active work which might have to be done. If 
we succeeded, a red-hot day would follow, but we expected to be away. 
But the friends of Doy who remained and were suspected of taking a part 
in the rescue, were bound to suffer, and his safety depended upon his keep- 
ing off of the line of suspicion. Our plan was to take a pretended horse- 
thief to jail about eleven o'clock at night, and by that means get into, and 
possession of the jail. 

But Dr. Grant was of the opinion that all criminals captured after night 
were placed in the city calaboose and remained there until they had a hear- 
ing, and this statement seemed to be confirmed by the opinions of his friends ; 
and so for the time being we abandoned the original plan, and began prep- 
arations to break into the jail, and to that end we procured some large files, 
and ascertained where we could on short notice procure hammers, sledges 
and chisels. Through Dr. Grant we made an arrangement with some of the 
Elwood boys, by which they were to procure boats, and have them at a con- 
venient point on the St. Joseph side of the river, at twelve o'clock at night, 



318 State Histobical society. 

of the following day, which would be Saturday. In the mean time the boys 
of our party were promenading through the streets and alleys of the city 
in order to become familiar with the cuts, fills and embankments, and dan- 
gerous places, so that if we found it necessary to make a rapid retreat, we 
could do so without greatly endangering our lives, for at that time there was 
a large force of men engaged in grading the streets, and some of the cuts 
were very deep. 

Up to Saturday morning the weather had been hot and dry, and the 
streets were very dusty, but now the rain began to fall, and it thundered 
and lightened by spells all day, and the rain was very heavy and continu- 
ous until nine o'clock at night, and the newly-graded streets and sidewalks 
were so muddy that they were almost impassable. 

At noon we were still expecting to have to force our way into the jail, 
and in order to ascertain the most vulnerable point of attack, young Soule 
was detailed to go into the jail and make as full investigation of the condi- 
tion of the building as the opportunity would admit. Soule immediately 
repaired to the jail, informed the jailer that he had a verbal message from 
Mrs. Doy to her husband. Dr. John Doy, who he understood was a prisoner 
in the building. The jailer, Mr. Brown, immediately led the way to the 
door of the room where the Doctor was confined, and threw open the out- 
side or heavy oaken door, leaving the iron-grated door between the Doctor 
and Soule. After the usual greetings, Soule informed the Doctor that he 
was in Lawrence a few days ago, and called on his wife, and told her that 
he expected to pass through St. Joseph on his way East, and if she had any 
message to send her husband he would probably have time to deliver it, and 
Mrs. Doy wished him to say to the Doctor that his friends had given up 
all hopes of obtaining his release through the courts, and that undoubtedly 
in a few days he would be sent to the penitentiary in accordance with the 
sentence of the court; but the efforts of his friends would not cease, and 
they hoped and prayed the time would soon come, when such an appeal 
would be made to the Governor of Missouri, that through him they would 
be able to obtain that justice which the courts had failed to grant him. She 
said also that her health was poor; she dared not attempt a journey to St. 
Joseph, and so she was compelled to forego her great desire to see him be- 
fore he was taken away. But he must keep a good heart, and remember 
that He who tempers the winds to the shorn lamb will not forget His own 
child, who suffers for a kindness done to the unfortunate. 

After Soule had given his message, he succeeded in prolonging his time 
by giving bits of news, scandal, &c., until he had made a tolerable good 
survey of the premises, and succeeded in turning the attention of the jailer 
away from him long enough to pass to Doy, through the grates, a ball of 
tw^ine and a paper, on which was written, ''To-night, at twelve o' clocks 
He then bade the doctor good-bye, and thanking the jailer for his courtesy, 
hurried back to make his report, which was, that with the best implements 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 319 

that we could get, it would take at least two hours of unmolested hard 
work to get through the doors into the room where Doy was confined. 

Of course this was very discouraging, but while we were discussing the 
matter, Dr. Grant came and told us that he had just learned that all crim- 
inals taken outside of the city limits in the night-tiuie were taken to the 
jail. This settled the question, and we at once went back to my first plan. 
It was decided to change the time appointed, to eleven o'clock instead of 
twelve, so if possible to get through and get onto the street about eleven 
and one-half o'clock, at which time, under an ordinance of the city, the 
theaters closed on Saturday nights, Ave to join in with the theater-goers 
on their way home, and thus avoid attracting attention of the police. 
Changing the time of operations would prevent us getting the Elwood 
boats, for there was not time nor opportunity to get the Elwood boys word, 
and so Mr. Willes and myself hunted up two boats that were about a block 
apart, found some oars in another place, and as soon as it was deemed safe 
to do so, put them in our boats, and as soon as it was dark had the boys 
walk to the boats and back to our quarters a number of times so that they 
could find the boats without difficulty in the dark. 

The jail was located near the center of a block a little northeast of the 
business part of the city, and nearly in the center of the city. The court 
house was to the best of my recollection about 200 feet south and 100 feet 
west of the jail, in the same block. The streets on three sides of said block 
had been graded so as to leave a bank next to the street from four to fif- 
teen feet. A night watch was stationed at the court house, whose duty it 
was to take care of the court house and jail. As soon as it was dark Soule 
was detailed to keep his eyes on said watchman till we came, but be care- 
ful that the watchman did not get his eye on him, and we were certain that 
the work would be well done. 

At about a quarter to eleven we started for the jail. The rain had ceased, 
but the clouds were thick, and it was a little foggy, and the darkness could 
almost be felt. After we passed from the business streets, there were no 
street lamps. The rains had cooled off the atmosphere so that the windows 
in the dwellings were closed, and the lights were out, and the appearances 
indicated that the inhabitants in that portion of the city were in a profound 
slumber — for all of which we thanked God and took courage. But in order 
to keep together without talking, we were compelled to take hold of hands, 
because we could not distinguish anything by the eye. 

When we got near the jail we halted, and Soule came to us and reported 
that the watchman had just visited the jail, and returned to the south side 
of the court house, where he was now sitting under the porch. Soule was 
ordered to take Sinex with him, and take a position where they could see 
every movement of the watchman, and while they were to be very careful 
not to alarm him, yet they were to be more careful that he did not alarm 
anyone else. While all the members of the party understood the general 



320 State Histobical Society. 

plan that was to be executed, no one knew what part he was to take, until 
we arrived on the ground. To Mr. Willes was assigned the duty of leading 
spokesman. Mr. Simmons was to take the part of a horse-thief, with his 
hands apparently tied with a cord which was attached to a slung-shot. Mr. 
Gardner was detailed to sustain Mr. Willes, using his best judgment and 
discretion, and they were started without an instant's delay, to their work, 
with the positive assurance that they would be protected in the rear. 

The three went promptly to the door of the jail and the ordinary raps 
were made on the door. In less than half a minute the window overhead 
was raised, and the questions were asked, " Who is there ? What is wanted ? " 
Mr. Willes replied, " We have a horse-thief we would like to put in jail 
for safe keeping." The answer was, " Wait a minute, and I will be down." 
Then I was certain we should succeed. I knew if they got to work before 
they had time to get nervous, they would go through all right. When Mr. 
Brown, the jailer, came and opened the door, he bade them walk in, and in- 
quired if they had the papers for making the arrest, and if either of them was 
an officer. The answer was: No, we are only private citizens ; but the facts 
in the case are these: this man was in the employ of one of our neighbors 
down in the southeast portion of this county, and last night, while he and 
his employer were trying to make a settlement they disagreed as to the 
amount that was due, and came to hard words, and this man left the house. 
In the morning one of our neighbors' horses was missing, as was also this 
man, and it was generally believed he was the thief, and a number of par- 
ties started out in different directions in search of the horse and thief. It 
so happened we struck his trail and followed till nearly night, when we 
overtook and found him and the horse under a shed about six or eight miles 
from the city." Mr. Brown seemed loth to receive him without the proper 
papers, saying if itshould so appear that this man was not guilty, he and his 
bondsmen might be held for heavy damages. Both Mr. Willes and Mr. 
Gardner assured him there could not possibly be any mistake about his 
guilt. Mr. Brown turned to Simmons and said, "Are you willing to ac- 
knowledge that you stole the horse?" Simmons, in a rough and insolent 

manner replied, " Do you suppose that I am a d d fool ? No, sir ! I 

won't do anything of the kind. I expect to have a trial." Simmons's man- 
ner seemed to "rile" Mr. Brown somewhat, and he replied, "I believe you 
are a thief, and I will take the chances and put you in." The prisoner was 
then taken to the door where Soule had met Dr. Doy. Mr. Brown got the 
keys and unlocked the oak and grated doors, and told Simmons to walk in, 
but Simmons, seeing the drawing of a human skeleton on the wall declared 
he would not go into such a place. Mr. Brown walked into the room evi- 
dently to give assurance to Mr. Simmons, when Mr. Gardner, not seeing 
Dr. Doy, and thinking that they might be going into a trap, said, "Brown, 
what has become of that old nigger-thief, Dow or Day, or some such name?" 
"Perhaps," said Brown, "you mean Dr. Doy; if so, he is here," and Doy 



r 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 321 

immediately came to the door with his bundle. Then said Mr. Gardner, 
"This is but a ruse to take the Doctor home to his family." Mr. Brown 
made an effort to close the door and shut Doy in, but when he saw three 
powerful men with deadly weapons in their hands and determination on 
their faces, he saw that resistance was useless, and he permitted Doy to 
come out, and the remainder of the prisoners were coming too, had they not 
been forced back at the muzzle of a revolver — for Doy, at risk of his own 
life and of his friends', had been true to his failing (indiscretion), and told 
his fellow-prisoners that he was sure of being released that night, and they 
had their bundles ready to depart with him. 

While this proceeding had been going on in the jail, the rest of our men 
had been on the alert, guarding against surprise from without. I had taken 
a position in the reception-room as soon as Brown had opened the way to the 
prison, so that I could take cognizance of what was going on inside and out. 
There was a bed in the reception-room, occupied by a man named Slay back, 
a friend of the jailer, and who had been detained on account of the storm. 
When he heard me come in he became somewhat alarmed, but his fears 
were soon quieted when I told him I was one of the party who helped cap- 
ture the horse-thief, and he said he thought we had done a good thing, to 
which I heartily assented. As soon as Brown came down with Dr. Doy 
and the other three men, Mr. Willes introduced him to me as their captain. 
I told him we had not time to stand on formalities, but that as soon as we 
had left the room he must put out the lights, lock his doors, and remain 
perfectly quiet until daylight; that I should leave a strong guard at the 
jail, and any attempt by him or any member of his family to leave the 
premises or to raise an alarm, would be done at the peril of their lives. 
Mr. Brown replied that this proceeding would place him in a very awkward 
and unpleasant position with his friends, and it would be difficult to satisfy 
them that he was not acting in collusion with Doy's rescuers. I replied, "In 
the morning you can publish a statement of this business as it appears to you, 
and fortunately you have a friend at hand who will corroborate your state- 
ment. When we get home we will publish a statement of the case just as 
it actually occurs, and we will exonerate you from intending to give us any 
assistance whatever ; " and thanking him for his uniformly kind treatment 
of Dr. Doy, I took him by the hand, and again cautioning him to see that 
my injunctions were obeyed, I bade him good-night and we left the room, 
and the lights went out, showing that the first order had been obeyed. The 
guard that was left consisted of the jailer's fears. 

A signal brought our party together, and we were on the way. The moon 
had risen, and although it was still cloudy, we could distinguish forms, 
and had no difficulty in seeing our way. We got into the business portion 
of the city, which was still lighted, just as the theater let out. We at once 
mixed up with the theater-goers, and worked our way toward our boats, 
and after we arrived within about 200 yards of the river, our party divided 



322 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 

and part went to the lower boat, but Doy went with those who were to take 
the upper boat, and they were followed by two policemen with lanterns to 
the river, who held their lights while one of the men bailed out the boat 
with his hat, and until the boats were pushed from the shore, into the strong 
current of the Missouri. We soon hauled our borrowed boats high and dry 
on the sandbar on the Kansas side, and (in our hearts) thanking the owners 
for their use, we hitched up our teams, and, with Dr. Stewart for our guide, 
at about twelve o'clock were on our winding way for Lawrence. Our guide 
stayed with us till about eight o'clock, and until he had procured for us of 
one of his friends a good breakfast and feed for our horses, which was fully 
appreciated. About ten o'clock in the morning we observed six horsemen 
coming about a mile in our rear, and when they got within a half-mile of 
us they continued about that far off. When we stopped for dinner at one 
o'clock they stopped also. Soon we observed a footman leaving said party, 
and when he arrived we interviewed him and satisfied ourselves that he was 
sent to ascertain if Doy was with us, as well as the strength of our party. 
As we were ready to start, the gentleman being on foot, we pressed him so 
hard to ride with us, that he could not refuse, and he continued with us till 
dark, when he was seated by the road-side, and one of our horsemen re- 
mained with him for a half-hour, and as he left, advised the gentleman not 
to follow our party. I suppose he acted upon the advice, as we never saw 
him afterwards. 

About ten o'clock that night we found our way to a farm-house situated 
a little off from the road, near what was then known as Grasshopper Falls, 
owned and occupied by Rev. J. B. McAfee, now known as Hon. J. B. 
McAfee, present member of the Legislature from Shawnee county, at which 
place we were well fed and made very comfortable. Thinking that it was 
more than likely that the horseman who followed us would endeavor to get 
reinforced at Lecompton and try to recapture Dr. Doy, word was sent to 
Captain Jesse Newell, of Oskaloosa, to furnish an escort; and when we ar- 
rived at his place we found the Captain on hand with the following-named 
officers of his rifle company, to wit: Jerome Hazen, First Lieutenant; J. I. 
Forbes, Second Lieutenant; John Newell, Gil. Towner, Robert Newell, 
James Monroe, Resolve Fuller, M. R. Dutton — privates; and eight or ten 
others. And without delay we passed on, most of the escort going to within 
a few miles of Lawrence, and the captain and a few of his men going the 
whole distance, where we arrived about six o'clock in the evening, and 
where we also found the streets lined with people, listening to the glowing 
accounts of the "Doy Rescue" published in the St. Joseph papers, which 
had arrived about an hour before us, and which was the first intimation the 
public had that an attempt at rescue had been made. 

And in closing this sketch it is but due for me to say, that all the mem- 
bers of this little band under my command and leadership, engaged in this 
dangerous enterprise, manifested a cool and daring courage, wise discretion, 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 323 

and determined zeal in the execution of every duty to which they were 
severally assigned ; and it has ever been, and must ever be a consolation to 
each that in its execution no one, either friend or foe, was wronged or in- 
jured in person or property. 

While it was my intention, in connection with this sketch, to have given 
a brief biography of the actors in said drama, the time to which I am lim- 
ited compels me to only say, that all the members of said party, with the 
exception of Charles Doy, who died before the commencement of the war 
of the Rebellion, took an active and honorable part in the war, two having 
died in the service, four since the war, leaving but four now living. 



324 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY, 



NO MAN^S LAND. 



[An address delivered before the Kansas State Historical Society, February 11, 1889, 
by H. B. Kelly, of McPherson, Kansas.] 

During the past summer a tragedy occurred on the tract of land desig- 
nated on the maps as "No Man's Land," locally called "The Strip," and 
forming the southwest boundary of Kansas, in which four citizens, one of 
whom was an officer under the laws of this State, lost their lives. That 
such a tragedy, occurring so near the border of Kansas, should escape judi- 
cial investigation, called the attention of the entire country to the anoma- 
lous condition of this tract of land, situated in mid-continent and surrounded 
by law and the jurisdiction of courts of civil government. The situation 
seemed incomprehensible. The understanding was puzzled to conceive a 
condition attaining over any region of the American continent, much less 
in the heart of the United States, where courts exercise no shadow of juris- 
diction, where there is a total absence of civil government, where the taking 
of property and even life is not an offense against human law, for the reason 
that there is no human law there; for the reason that surrounding civiliza- 
tion, law and courts exercise no dominion over that strange part of the 
public domain. To answer the question, "How came this anomalous con- 
dition?" is the purpose of this paper. 

"No Man's Land" is a tract of country three degrees in length from east 
to west, lying between the one-hundredth and the one hundred and third 
degree of longitude, one-half degree from north to south, extending from 
thirty-six and a half to thirty-seven north latitude, bounded on the east by 
the Indian Territory, on the west by New Mexico, on the south by the Pan- 
handle of Texas, and north by Kansas and Colorado. There being no 
history of the formation of this tract of land, we must go to the history of 
the formation of the lines that bound it, in order to get the history of the 
land. This takes us back to the treaty between the United States and 
Spain in 1821, defining the boundary-line between the Louisiana purchase 
and Spanish possessions on the North-American continent. By this treaty 
the west line of the Louisiana purchase was established, commencing on 
the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of the Sabine river; thence running 
north on the present line between Louisiana and Texas to the Red river on 
the south line of the Indian Territory; thence following Red river in a 
northwesterly course to the one-hundredth meridian; thence turning north 
on the one-hundredth meridian, following this line north to the Arkansas 
river at a point near the present site of Dodge City ; thence following the 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 325 

Arkansas river to its source; and thence in a northwesterly course to the 
Pacific ocean, near the southern boundary of Oregon. The territory west 
of this line, including Mexico, belonged to Spain, and became independent 
of that governraent by the Mexican revolt, which soon followed the treaty 
between the United States and Spain. 

The Indian Territory was established by act of Congress in 1834, ex- 
tending from the Red river on the south to some point within the present 
State of Nebraska, and from the west line of Arkansas and Missouri, west- 
ward to the one-hundredth meridian, the then western limit of United 
States territory, below the thirty-eighth degree north latitude. 

Two years later, in 1836, the Cherokee lands in the Indian Territory were 
set apart or patented to the tribe, this grant including a large body in the 
northeast corner of the present territory, bounded on the north by the 
thirty-seventh degree north latitude, save a small jog on the east that crossed 
this line falling into the southeast corner of Kansas, the body of the grant, 
however, lying south of and coming up to the thirty-seventh degree. The 
tribe was also given a passage-way west to the buffalo country from the res- 
ervation, this pass being the strip of land about one degree in width, lying 
between the thirty-sixth and thirty-seventh degrees north latitude, and ex- 
tending from the body of the Cherokee grant, on the east, to the one-hun- 
dredth meridian, the Mexican boundary, on the west, or to the present east 
line of No Man's Land. 

When, in 1836, Texas seceded from Mexico, the Texas public laid claim 
to all the territory south of the Arkansas river, west of the one-hundredth 
meridian, and east of the Rio Grande. As Texas was not admitted to the 
Union until 1845, and as the Indian Territory was established in 1834, the 
western boundary-line of the territory was extended no further westward 
than to the east line of the Texas Panhandle, on the one-hundredth merid- 
ian. Thus, when the Indian Territory was established, in 1834, it was 
bounded on the south, and for about three hundred miles on the west, by 
Mexican territory. Between the date of the admission of Texas and 1850, 
difficulties arose with the people of the Territory of New Mexico, owing to 
the claims set up by Texas that its territory extended to the Rio Grande. 

Texas too, a slave State, was admitted to the Union, a portion of its ter- 
ritory extending north of the Missouri Compromise line, thirty-six degrees 
and thirty minutes, from which slavery was excluded by the Missouri Com- 
promise, so that, from 1845 to 1850, a citizen of Texas might not hold slave 
property in all sections of his State. It is interesting in this connection to 
note that the southwest portion of Kansas was once slave territory by the 
laws of Texas, though slavery was excluded by the Missouri Compromise. 

In 1850, Congress passed what was known as the "Omnibus Bill," which 
contained, among other measures, a provision for the purchase from Texas, 
for ten millions of dollars, paid in Government five-per-cent. bonds, all that 



326 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

portion of the State's territory lying north of thirty-six and a half degrees 
north latitude, and west of the one hundred and third meridian. This de- 
tached from the State on the north all its territory north of the Missouri 
Compromise line, extending from the present south line of No Man's Land 
to the Arkansas river, and on the west that portion claimed by New Mex- 
ico, lying between the present eastern boundary of that territory and the 
Rio Grande river. Thus the territory between the north line of the Texas 
Panhandle and the Arkansas river was cut off on the line between slave and 
free territory. The Omnibus bill also contained a provision establishing 
the Territory of New Mexico, with its eastern boundary-line on the one 
hundred and third meridian, the present west line of Texas and No Man's 
Land ; its northern boundary-line on the thirty-seventh degree of latitude, 
being a half-degree north of the north line of Texas, and on the line of the 
north boundary of the Cherokee grant. 

In 1854, the Kansas-Nebraska bill passed, organizing the Territories of 
Kansas and Nebraska out of Indian Territory. The south boundary- 
line of Kansas was established along the north line of the Cherokee grant, 
on the thirty-seventh parallel north latitude, cutting off only the small area 
of the grant on the east that jogged north of the line of thirty-seven de- 
grees, and following on this line to the mountains, conforming to the north 
line of New Mexico. To have taken in No Man's Land would have neces- 
sitated a jog south a half-degree, and then back north a half-degree. 

Thus we have the history of the four lines that bound " No Man's Land : " 
the east line established by treaty with Spain and the creation of the Indian 
Territory; the west line established by the formation of the Territory of 
New Mexico, our Spanish-American territory; the south line established to 
conform to the institution of slavery; and the north line fixed in compli- 
-ance with the demands of freedom and free soil. Also, we have the forma- 
tion of the two States, Kansas and Texas, north and south, and of the two 
Territories, Indian and New Mexico, east and west of this strip called "No 
Man's Land," the history of which, briefly summarized, is this: The Indian 
Territory on the east had its western boundary established when the strip, 
as a part of Texas, belonged to Mexico, and when that State was admitted 
to the Union as a slave State, the strip, including the country north to the 
Arkansas river, passed by agreement and sale in 1850 to the United States, 
being that portion of Texas from which slavery was excluded by the Mis- 
souri Compromise of 1820, the north line of Texas established on thirty- 
six degrees and thirty minutes. The creation of the Territory of New 
Mexico in 1850 fixed the eastern boundary of that territory on the one 
hundred and third meridian, making the western boundary of No Man's 
Land; and the creation of Kansas Territory in 1854, with its southern 
boundary on the thirty-seventh degree of latitude, this boundary having 
been determined by the northern limit of the Cherokee grant, Kansas tak- 



Sixth BiENmAL Repobt. 327 

ing in only so much of the Texas purchase as could be done and maintain 
a straight line for its southern border, fixed the northern boundary of this 
No Man's Land. 

The present strip belonged first to Spain, then to the Republic of Mexico, 
then became a part of the Republic and later the State of Texas, and then 
passed by purchase to the United States, to become No Man's Land. 

Here we have the history of the manner in which this tract of land, one- 
half degree from north to south by three degrees from east to west, lying 
between thirty-six and a half and thirty-seven degrees north latitude, and 
extending from the one-hundredth to the one hundred and third meridian, 
was left out of adjoining States and Territories. Prior to 1850 the courts 
of Texas had jurisdiction over this tract, as it was a part of that State. 
But as the Federal courts of Texas were created with jurisdiction for Texas, 
when this territory was cut ofl^ that State it passed from the jurisdiction of 
the courts of Texas, and never having been attached to any other State or 
Territory for judicial purposes, stands in fact, as it has stood for thirty-eight 
years, the land of no man — the only spot on American soil where there is 
neither law nor the shadow of authority, where there is no such functionary 
as an ofiicer, where might is right, and where every man is a law unto him- 
self. This strip of land in the heart of the Government, in so far as legal 
authority goes, stands as it did in the dawn of creation. For years the 
herdsman has grazed his herds there, as Abraham tended his flocks in the 
primeval history of the race. Business is transacted, and the tax-gatherer 
is unknown; distilleries are run, and Government makes no demand for 
revenue; the squatter on a piece of land may be driven therefrom by a 
stronger, and no legal protection can be invoked. Property belongs to the 
man who has the power to take and hold it, while a man's life is his own 
only so long as he has the ability to maintain it. 

It is interesting to note the historic surroundings of this tract called No 
Man's Land. Approaching its four sides, all of the ideas and elements of 
American civilization confront each other, while within its borders, sur- 
rounded by established law, anarchy holds complete sway. Its eastern 
border is on the western boundary-line of the last spot of ground claimed 
by and guaranteed the American Indian, out of all his original possessions. 
Coming up to this tract on the west is the eastern boundary-line of Spanish- 
American settlements, planted by Cortez on Mexican soil, and spreading 
to New Mexico, forty years prior to the English settlements on our eastern 
coast. Approaching it on the south was the territory of the master and 
slave, types of our Southern civilization which had settled Texas, the last 
State with slavery admitted to the Union. 

Adjoining it on the north lay the territory, the creation of which inaugu- 
rated the final conflict between freedom and slavery. Northern enterprise 
and freedom holding possession. Spanish-Mexican civilization, in its slow 
march from the Pacific coast eastward, here met Anglo-American civilizar 



328 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

tion in its rapid march westward from the Atlantic coast. Jamestown slav- 
ery and Southern civilization coming up to the south of this tract of land, 
was confronted by Plymouth freedom and Northern civilization on its north- 
ern boundary. On the east, standing upon all that remained to him of a 
continent, the Indian had come, a mute and helpless witness of the conflict 
between the despoilers of his home. He saw the approach on one side of 
the Spanish-American, and on the other the Anglo-American settlers upon 
his domain — the meeting of northern and southern Europe on American 
soil. He saw the last two States admitted to the Union prior to the war for 
slavery, Kansas and Texas, representing freedom and slavery, drawn up 
in hostile attitude and separated only by this neutral land, claimed by no 
man. He saw here the near coming together, separated only by this little 
neutral strip, of the civilization of northern and southern Europe as it had 
grown upon American soil since its planting by Cortez and the Puritans. 
He saw the Catholicism of Spain here meet the Protestantism of England. 
Standing north and south of this strip, he saw American freedom and Amer- 
ican slavery ; behind one the National idea, behind the other State Sover- 
eignty. 

Here upon this neutral ground that lay between these conflicting forces 
with widely divergent ideas, the Spanish-Mexican, the aggressive Yankee, 
the Southern master, the oppressed slave, and the American Indian, could 
meet with no lawful superiority attaching to either. Slavery and citizen- 
ship were unknown, the Catholicism of Spain and the Protestantism of Eng- 
land were on a level, the Indian alone finding upon this tract of land the 
primitive condition and freedom of his native soil. Here the prowess be- 
longed alone to him who could establish and maintain it by force. Civ- 
ilization was not there to make distinctions, nor the laws of man to work 
injustice. 

The Indian was a helpless spectator of the coming together of the antago- 
nistic forces of our American civilization, around this little tract of No Man's 
Land. This meeting, in mid-continent, of England and Spain from the 
east and from the west, the approach of the spirit of freedom and slavery 
from the north and the south, and the location of the Indian as a witness of 
the scene, is the true cause of the existence of the spot of ground where all 
meet on terms of equality, where neither the laws of church nor state, 
Europe nor America, interfere, but where in the midst of civilization anarchy 
has its abode. 

This is indeed " No Man's Land," the ideal home of the Anarchist. 

Here we see a land without government, in which we find a striking illus- 
tration of the absence of law in the uninvestigated homicides of last sum- 
mer, while upon the other hand, a trial and execution in an adjoining State 
affords a vivid picture of the supremacy and worth of civil government. 

During the summer of 1885, two young Englishmen, traveling in com- 
pany, stopped to rest in one of the great cities of this country. Aliens, so- 



Sixth biennial Repobt, 329 

journing in a strange land, they were unheeded by the multitude surrounding 
them. Among all the inhabitants of that city, neither had acquaintance, 
friend or relative who might be moved by the ties of friendship or con- 
sanguinity to inquire into and avenge the death of the other. Neither, as 
a citizen, claimed protection from the Government, the State, or the city 
in which he was lodging for the night. Neither had contributed of his 
means to the support of the municipal. State or National Government. 
Neither owed allegiance to the Government, nor could they be called upon 
to bear arms for the public defense. They might have taken their depart- 
ure, and the people of that city would not have noted their absence. Had 
they fallen into the river and drowned, their disappearance would have 
elicited no inquiry as to their whereabouts. 

Why should the public have had an interest in these two aliens, lodging 
for a day or two in an American city, while journeying from continent to 
continent, and from city to city ? They could claim no other protection 
than that due from the host to his guest. 

One of these travelers took the life of the other, and the man whose hands 
were stained with blood, leaving the remains of his late companion, contin- 
ued his journey across the continent, and reaching a city on the Pacific 
coast, embarked for the city of Auckland, on the distant island of New 
Zealand, a land so remote, that a few years ago it would have insured the 
fugitive immunity from detection and arrest — a land in which his crime 
would not have followed him nor the officer of the law sought him out. Be- 
tween the place of his destination and the city where he had committed the 
greatest crime known to the law, half the circumference of the globe inter- 
vened. Who then should follow him ? What friend or relative had the 
dead Preller to pursue the murderer across the American continent, and 
down the length of the Pacific ocean to the far-oflP city of Auckland in the 
island of New Zealand ? Why should the people of the city, or the State, 
or the Government where the crime had been committed, pursue, regardless 
of cost, an alien and a stranger who had done no personal harm to any 
citizen, and who had but taken the life of an alien and a stranger ? The 
murderer had passed beyond the jurisdiction of the city, the State, and the 
Government. To bring him back would entail great expense upon the 
public, and as no friend invoked the law nor called upon its officers to pur- 
sue, arrest and punish the fleeing fugitive, why not let him go? He would 
never return, and to let him go would have been less expensive. 

But the law had been violated, life had been taken, the guarantee of 
protection by the laws of civilization, by the strong arm of the State, had 
been brought to naught, and in the detection and punishment of crime, law 
awaits not the command of heated blood of relative or friend, neither does it 
weigh the cost of punishment. The majesty of law counts not distance nor 
difficulty in bringing to punishment those who violate and trample it under 
foot, but punishment for crime committed is, and must forever be, the com- 



330 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

mon cause of civilization, while the sheriff of distant lands stands ready to 
obey the call for help, coming from other portions of a civilization encir- 
cling the globe. 

Before the vessel that bore the guilty Maxwell had passed beyond sight 
of the land in which he had committed his crime, and from which he was 
fleeing, the officer in the city of Auckland was armed with a description of 
the fugitive and a warrant for his arrest; a warrant issued by officers whom 
he knew not, and for a man of whom he had never heard. That message, 
carried by electricity, passed over mountain and plain and lighted its path- 
way through the mysterious caverns of the ocean, traveling in its circuitous 
route a distance of more than fifteen thousand miles. It flashed across the 
American continent, passed down under the Atlantic ocean, crossed over 
the British Islands, down again beneath the waters of the English channel, 
and came up skirting the western coast of Europe ; again taking to the water, 
it passed under the Mediterranean sea; coming up on the shores of Africa, 
it lighted up the northern coast of the dark continent, took the track 
of the Israelites across the Red sea, traversed the southern shore of Asia, 
and again taking to the water, it passed through the silent depths of 
the Indian ocean, crossed over the islands and beneath the waters of the 
Southern Pacific, and fell at last into the hands of a policeman in that re- 
mote civilization, a request that civil government there assist civil govern- 
ment here in the enforcement of its laws. Planted upon every continent, 
and upon the distant islands of the sea; united in a common cause for the 
protection of life and liberty; connected by electric currents encircling the 
globe, obliterating time and space and bidding defiance to the elements ; 
government and courts of justice call forth our admiration. Wonderful 
achievement of civilization, in thus enabling continent to answer continent, 
with island echoing assent to the call of civil government upon every part 
of the globe; in the enforcement of law wherever civil government has 
planted its standard. "And I saw a new heaven and a new earth : for the 
first heaven and the first earth were passed away, and there was no more 
sea. 

The surrendered fugitive returned to be prosecuted and defended at the 
expense of the State whose law he had violated. Civilization would not 
murder even a murderer, and hence it said to Maxwell, make defense in the 
courts ; and after three years, in which all the courts of the land had heard 
the case, the sentence of death was pronounced, and the offended law was 
appeased. The law alone prosecuted this alien murderer, as, during the 
long period from the commission of the crime to its expiation, no friend or 
acquaintance of the dead Preller appeared in this country to urge prosecu- 
tion. This is civil government, illustrated in its vigilance, its power, its 
grandeur, and its justice. 

What a contrast the tragedy of No Man's Land presents. What a strik- 
iVig picture is aflTorded by that uninvestigated homicide, occurring near the 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 331 

border of Kansas, between citizens of this State, illustrating the total ab- 
sence of government, and courts of law, the foundation of all government. 

The dead of No Man's Land were citizens of this State. They owed 
allegiance to the Government, and the Government and State owed them 
protection. But by reason of the absence of law, the nature of that homi- 
cide may not even be inquired into. There is no court there to hear, no 
sheriff to arrest, no witness to testify, no law to enforce, no law violated ; 
hence no crime against human law, for the reason that there is no human 
law where that homicide occurred. A land with a total absence of govern- 
ment. The silent land of which Tennyson says: "In the afternoon we 
came to a land in which it seemed always afternoon." 

For the first time in the history of the Government, courts acknowledge 
"no jurisdiction" over a portion of the public domain. The only spot on 
the American continent where civil government has no power, where law 
has no existence, where courts have no dominion, where we may see the 
condition of the earth as it was "when the morning stars sang together," 
and where every man is a law unto himself. With this, contrast the vig- 
ilance and power for protection by civil government as illustrated in the 
Maxwell-Preller case. Count then the cost of civil government — the 
temple adorned with the jewels gathered and preserved through the cen- 
turies of time, still bright with splendor, maintained with blood and treas- 
ure, in war and in peace; and, with all its defects, would we exchange it 
for a condition attaining in the total absence of all government, law, and 
the authority of courts of justice? 
—22 



332 State histobical Society. 



ALVAE NUNEZ CABEgA DE VAC A. 



[A paper read before the Kansas State Historical Society at a special meeting, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1889, by Hon. Joel Moody.] 

When the history of Kansas shall have been written, the events connected 
with the remarkable journey of Cabega de Vaca will find important place 
therein. It is the object of this paper to give some connected account of 
his pilgrimage across the continent, and to connect his name with the earli- 
est recorded entrance of white man within the borders of Kansas. He 
preceded Coronado into Kansas nearly six years; and traveled the course 
he afterward took from Culiacan through New Mexico and Kansas for 
more than seventeen hundred miles. 

It was Castaneda, the companion of Coronado and the historian of his 
expedition in search of the seven cities of Cibola and the famed land of 
Quivira, who first drew attention to the fact that Cabega had visited a vil- 
lage of Indians of the plains far to the northeast of the country of the 
Pueblos. This village was made of tents of tanned buffalo-skins, and in- 
habited by Indians who were like Arabs, and whom Cabega named Quere- 
chaos. In fact Cabega was the forerunner, a sort of John the Baptist in 
the wilderness, preparing the way for Coronado. He related to him the 
exploits of his journey, and told him of the "Town of Hearts," which 
stood at the gates of the mountains and which opened to the great Plains ; 
for he says : " It is the entrance [from the plains] into many provinces that 
are on the South Sea ; and whoever goes to seek it and does not enter there, 
will be lost." From the account given by Castanedo of the distance trav- 
eled and the direction they took from this place — which must have been 
at or near Las Vegas, New Mexico — the village of the plains mentioned 
by Cabega was in the southwestern portion of Kansas.. If so, the narrative 
of Cabega must corroborate the fact. 

This narrative of Cabega was written after he returned from America, 
and was first printed in Spain in 1542, and again in 1555. It remained 
unread except by Spanish students for nearly three hundred years, when 
in 1851 Buckingham Smith, secretary to the Spanish legation from the 
United States, translated it into English. Whilst this translation places it 
within reach of the American student, there has been no one to turn its 
pages except the recluse or mousing archaeologist possessed of the insane 
desire for ancient things. 

Alvar Nunez Cabega de Vaca was the son of Francisco de Vera and 
grandson of Pedro de Vera, "he that conquered the Canary;" and his 
mother was Terega Cabega de Vaca. He was commissioned treasurer and 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 333 

high sheriff under Pamphilo de Narvaez, and accompanied him in his ill- 
fated expedition into Florida. 

They first landed about seventeen miles north of the mouth of Tampa 
bay, on the 15th of April, 1528. Here they found unmistakable evidence 
that the Spaniard had preceded them ; for they were shown pieces of linen 
and woolen cloth, and also "many cases such as are used to contain the 
merchandise of Castile, in each of which was a dead man, and the bodies 
were covered with painted deer-skins," This ghastly display of dead 
Christians, incased in the mercantile crates of Castile, was indeed a gloomy 
foreboding, and sufficient warning of what might come to them. This 
idolatry of the New World ; this sacred saving of the dead, had hitherto 
been unknown to the worshipful children of Spain, and the bodies were 
burned amid the execrations of the followers of the Cross and their prayers 
for the souls of the departed. Here, also, they found bunches of feathers 
representing the rich plumage of the tropics, and some samples of gold, the 
glittering allurement of their enterprise. These, no doubt, had been brought 
there by the same dead Spaniards over the gulf or across the continent, 
as samples of the riches of New Spain, which Cortes had just conquered. 
Here, then, at his first entrance into the flowery land, he had met the Indian 
with his gold, but it was not the gold of Florida. 

In answer to the inquiry, "Where did you obtain this gold?" the nat- 
ural desire in mankind for self-preservation brought into play the Indian's 
propensity to lie. For surely the natives had already learned that when the 
Spaniard asked for gold he asked at the same time their lives to obtain it. 
Cabega often tells us "the Indians are all great liars." And why should 
they not be ? Here had come upon them an enemy, whose only love seemed 
to be the love of gold ; and for which he was willing to murder whole tribes 
of Indians. They answered: "In the land of Apalache, in the far-away, is 
much gold, and an abundance of all you greatly value." This place of 
gold, this unknown land in the far-away, was the ever-recurring and im- 
portant factor in the question : How shall we get rid of the Spaniard ? To 
this place they always directed, giving their wisest and bravest guides a 
willing sacrifice to mislead. In the far-away is the spot where they expect 
the Spaniard to perish. It is where no gold is to be found, but where 
seasons the most inclement, enemies the most pitiless, and misfortunes the 
most terrible will overtake him. It was thus the cacique Uracca betrayed 
De Avila into the wilds of Panama. It was thus " Pedro," the Indian 
guide, led De Soto into the pathless and almost interminable wilderness 
after the vain illusions of gold. A remarkable instance of this strategy, 
this subtle defensive warfare against a superior and invading foe, was, 
when " II Turco," a Pueblo cacique, oflTered himself as a guide to Coronado 
to lead him to the land of Quivira, where he said there was " a city of ex- 
traordinary buildings full of gold;" that "the commonest dishes were of 
sculptured silver, and that the bowls, plates and dishes were of gold." It 



334 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

seems now strange to us that civilized men, many of whom were of high 
birth, brought up at the feet of kings, educated in the universities of 
Europe, and taught the art of war in the renowned schools of chivalry, 
would come to America to be made the easy and apparently willing dupes 
of the naked savage of the primeval forest and plain. But such was the 
case. And when the lies of the savage guide had brought the duped to his 
full stop, to the butt of his pilgrimage, his astonishment is unparalleled 
to behold the frankness of the liar, and the firmness and fearlessness with 
which he meets his death. Cabega, however, as will hereafter be shown, 
was one of the few who took advantage of this Indian characteristic to his 
own personal benefit and final deliverance. 

Although the Governor, Narvaez, made a temporary landing at or near 
Tampa bay, and sent out a few scouts to reconnoiter the country, it was not 
until the first day of May that he eflfected a permanent landing; audit 
proved to be permanent — for the invading army of soldiers, temporal and 
spiritual, and the ships which brought them, separated forever. On this 
day three hundred men all told, among whom were two friars and three cler- 
gymen, landed to go in quest of gold; to plant the cross and to conquer the 
country in the name of the most catholic, the most royal and potent prince 
on earth, Charles the Fifth. Of the eighty horses they started with from 
Havana only half were alive when they landed, and but few of these were 
fit for service. They proved, however, to be of some little service as food 
for these starving adventurers before the short campaign ended. Cabega 
warned the Governor to not separate from the ships until they were gotten 
into a secure port, and there to be kept in readiness for their return ; for in 
case of failure or disaster they would be indispensable. But the Governor 
had his own way, and ordered that "the ships should go along the coast 
until coming to the port which the pilots said and believed was near them." 
But the pilots knew little about it, and so long as they were to stay in the 
ships, cared less. So those that came in by the ships, separated from those 
that went out; three hundred on land, and one hundred on sea. Yet Cabega 
might have saved himself the terrible ordeal that was awaiting him in the 
eight years to come, and have sunk into oblivion without being the hero of 
his own travels and misfortunes, had he taken command of the fleet which 
the Governor oflTered him. At this juncture he interposed, and said : 

"I rejected the responsibility, as I felt certain and knew he was never more to 
find the ships nor the ships him ; that I desired rather to expose myself to the dan- 
ger which he and the rest adventured, and to pass through that which he and they 
might pass, than to take charge of the ships, and give occasion of its being said 
that I had opposed the invasion, and remained behind from timidity, and my cour- 
age go in question, and that I chose rather to risk my life than put my honor in 
such a position." 

That band of three hundred men are now rationed for their campaign 
with two pounds of biscuit and a half-pound of bacon each ; not for the day, 
but for all time. Beyond this ration, to the country they must look for 



Sixth biexnial Report. 335 

food. Upon the ships safely on the sea they cast a parting glance, then 
wave them adieu and turn their faces to the wilderness. Those upon the 
waters were safe and merry. Even the wives in the ships who left their 
adventurous husbands on land, were in the embrace of other husbands be- 
fore they were out of sight of land. On this ration above mentioned, to 
which may be added the food of the palmetto they found on their way, these 
men subsisted and traveled fifteen days through woods, swamps and bayous, 
at the end of which time they reached the Withlacooche river about ten 
miles from its mouth. Here they met about two hundred Indians. Cabeea 
says: 

"The Governor met them, and conversing by signs they so insulted us with their 
gestures that we were forced to quarrel with them. We seized upon five or six and 
they took us to their houses, which were half a league off. We gave infinite thanks 
to our Lord for having succored us in so great necessity, for we were yet young in 
trial, and besides the weariness in which we came we were exhausted from hunger," 

Perhaps Cabega did not know, at least he leaves out an important fact, 
that here the Governor Narvaez captured the Chief Ucita and cut off his 
nose. Then to the disgrace of his mutilation and physical suffering he 
added a stab to his affections by having his mother torn in pieces by dogs. 
Exactly ten years after this, De Soto met this noseless chief, who contested 
the Spanish entrance into his dominions; and in answer to a message from 
De Soto, he returned the words: "It is heads, not speeches, I want." 

Not finding any encouragement at the place where Ucita lost his nose, 
they now set out for the Apalache, the far-famed land of gold and plenty. 
On the 17th of June, slowly plodding on their way thither, they reached 
the Suwanee river about one hundred miles inland north of its mouth. 
Here they were received by a tribe who honored their chief by dressing 
him in painted deer-skins, and by having him borne on the shoulders of the 
stoutest brave, preceded by a great number of people playing on " flutes of 
reeds." He exchanged with the Governor the painted robe he wore for a 
few beads and hawk-bells, and assured the Spaniard he would assist in lead- 
ing him to Apalache. Nothing could be more propitious. But " how vain 
are the illusions of hope ! " This chief was the famed Dulchanchillan, who 
had spread the net into which the game was about to enter. Cabega says : 

"They conducted us through a country very difficult to travel and wonderful to 
behold. In it there are vasts forests ; the trees astonishingly high, and so many of 
them fallen on the ground that they obstructed our march in a manner that we could 
not get on without much going round and greatly increased toil. We labored through 
these impediments until the day after St. John's, when we came in view of Apalache. 
We gave many thanks to God at seeing ourselves so near, believing it true what had 
been told us of that land, and that there would be an end to our hardships, which 
had been caused as much by the length and badness of the way as by our excessive 
hunger, for although we sometimes found maize, we oftener traveled seven or eight 
leagues without finding any ; and, besides this and the great fatigue, many had galls 
on their shoulders from carrying arms on their backs ; and more than these we en- 
dured. Yet, having come to the place desired, and where we had been informed 



336 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

there was so much food and gold, it appeared to us that we had already recovered 
in a measure from our pains and toil." 

This town consisted of forty small, thatched wigwams, surrounded by a 
dense and almost impassable forest ; obstructed by fallen trees, and filled 
with lakes, lagoons, and marshes ; with bewildering pathways and manifold 
coverts and wooded dens for the implacable foe. The army charged upon 
the town, but there was no returning shot from the brave. They entered 
to find only a few women and boys grinding corn at the mills of the mortar 
and pestle. These capitulated without being required to deliver up their 
arms, and fed the hungry horde. The warriors two hours thereafter came 
in, proclaiming peace and good-will, and petitioned only for their women 
and children, which petition was granted. And this was Apalache, and 
thus the town fell ; but the enemy was not conquered. 

The army is now in the famed city. They have eaten of the bread-corn 
and drank the water at the well, but the gold was not there. At last they 
asked themselves the question, "How shall we get out?" It mattered not 
which way they attempted an exit, it was all the same, an interminable and 
deadly passage. The foe they had now to encounter was there on all sides 
in ambush; and such a foe let Cabega himself describe: "They are all 
archers. They go naked, and as they are large of body they appear at a 
distance to be giants. They are a people of admirable proportions, very 
tall, and of very great activity and strength. The bows they use are as 
thick as the arm, of eleven or twelve palms in length, which they discharge 
at two hundred paces with so great exactness that they never miss." He 
also says in describing the desperate effort to get out of Apalache : 

"In this conflict some of our men were wounded for whom the good armor they 
wore did not avail, and there were men this day who swore that they had seen two 
oaks, each as thick as the lower part of the leg, pierced through from side to side 
by the arrows of the Indians ; and this is not so much to be wondered at, consider- 
ing the force and precision with which they shoot ; and I myself saw an arrow that 
had entered the foot of an elm the depth of a palm." 

These Indians never tired. They could run all day and overtake a deer, 
tiring him out. 

Narvaez now longed for the ships, and turned his face seaward to a town 
or land called Ante, distant nine days' travel. After a terrible struggle 
for nine days, through the wilderness he was in, and against this foe above 
described, he at last arrived at Ante, about the first of September, to find 
the town burnt and the inhabitants all gone. This was near the mouth of 
the river Appalachicola, and which Cabega calls the river of the Magdalen. 
Here the enterprise was at an end. The sea was before them, the wilder- 
ness behind. They had left their dead in the jungles, and death, himself, 
was in their camp claiming his own. They had conquered no mighty race 
of men on whom to confer the religion of the cross; they had found no 
worthy land to be taken in the name of the royal king and emperor, Charles; 
there was no triumphal march of the returning host; they had found no 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 337 

gold; there was neither emerald, nor topaz, nor pearl; there was no trophy 
in proof of the prowess of Chivalry, except, perhaps the nose of the cacique 
Ucita, which soD3.e soldier might have worn about his neck for a charm. 
Their ships were gone with their merry wives, and now the task was before 
them to make new boats and get out to sea, for it were better to risk the 
multitudinous and tempestuous waves than to again meet their foes of the 
land. 

They came out of the wilderness and reached an inland point of the bay 
of Appalachicola, a short distance east of the mouth of the river by that 
name. The river Cabega, named '' rio de la Magdalena," and the bay he 
named "la baya de Cavallos," the bay of horses; for it was here they ate 
up all their horses and used their skins, manes and tails for their boats. 
From Tampa bay, which Cabega named "baya de la Cruz," bay of the 
cross, to the bay of horses was "two hundred and eighty leagues, or there- 
abouts," according to the estimate of the pilots. But the pilots knew as 
little about the distances on sea as did the army on land, for the true dis- 
tance is not more than that many miles. 

At this point they called a counsel, not of war, exactly, but of escape. 
In this they "coincided in one great project" as Cabega says: "extremely 
difficult to put in operation, and that was to build vessels in which we 
might go away. This, to all, appeared impossible, for we knew not how to 
build, nor were there tools, nor iron, nor forge, nor tow, nor resin, nor rig- 
ging." But necessity is the mother of invention. A veritable Vulcan of the 
forge appeared as by miracle, and a Greek at that; and called of God as 
his name would indicate, Dorotheo Theodoro. Bellows he made from 
pipes of wood and deer-skins. Tools of the forge he made, and after these 
nails and bolts for the boats, from the stirrups, spurs, and cross-bows of the 
fighting cavaliers. In place of tow for the boats they used palmetto and 
pitched them with the resin of the pine. From the husks of the palmetto 
and from the tails and manes of the horses they made ropes and rigging, 
and from their shirts, sails. While this work was going on, they killed a 
horse every third day. A few shell-fish were caught, but at the expense of 
the lives of ten of their number, who were shot down in the coves where 
they ventured to gather them, and in sight of their camp. " We found them," 
says Cabega, "traversed from side to side by arrows, and, although some 
had on good armor, it did not aflford sufficient protection against the nice 
and powerful archery of which I have spoken before." 

By the 20th of September they had constructed five boats, twenty-two 
feet long, into which they hastened with a poor supply of fresh water in 
buckets made of the skins of horses' legs. They sailed from the " bay of 
horses" in these small and weak crafts on the 22d. Into these five boats 
they were crowded as follows : Three contained forty-nine each ; one took 
in forty-eight, and one forty-seven, making in all two hundred and forty-two 



338 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

yet alive. These boats were so heavily freighted that " there remained not 
over a span of the gunwales above the water." 

And now they spread their sails and sturdily take the oars in hand and 
steer for the setting sun. For seven days without seeing land they tug at 
the oars and pray for the strengthening breeze. Then another seven days, 
and still on, now touching on islands, now on the main land, then into 
creeks and coves that lay far inland, until thirty days had passed. The 
buckets made from horses' legs had rotted, and all the fresh water, rotten 
though it was, had escaped. The provisions had nearly all disappeared, 
and now, as before, hunger and thirst were gnawing at their vitals. At the 
end of this time they landed for water. But while in search of it they 
were taken in a storm, which lasted six days, and here on land they came 
near perishing, for the land, as the sea, afforded them no water. Of this 
Cabega says : "Although the storm had not ceased, and we found that our 
thirst increased and the (salt) water killed us, we resolved to venture the 
peril of the sea than await the certainty of death which thirst imposed." 
So back to the sea they go again ; and "on this day," says Cabega, "we our- 
selves were many times overwhelmed by the waves and in such jeopardy that 
there was not one who did not suppose his death certain." They now try 
the land again, and find water, offered by the natives; but this only tempted 
them into renewed peril, for at the dead hour of night the Indians fell upon 
them suddenly and drove them back into the sea, not one having escaped 
unhurt. Three days more by sea and again overpowered by thirst, they 
ventured once more to try the land. Here they were met by some Indians, 
unwilling, it seems, to tell them where they could find water, but consented 
to bring it to them. At this juncture the Greek, Dorotheo Theodoro, de- 
sired to go for the water, and taking with him a negro they passed from the 
boat to land, and were by them never more heard of. Nor did the Span- 
iards here get water. It now became evident that the natives all along the 
coast had determined to exterminate their enemy, and that after driving 
the invading host of Narvaez into the sea, it was their fell design to keep 
them there. They now venture again upon the waves, and in two or three 
days more the boats separated, never more to meet. On the 6th of Novem- 
ber, 1528, Cabega and his companions landed on an island, now supposed to 
be Santa Rosa, and which he named "Malhado" (Misfortune). 

It may be well to note here, in passing, that the Greek artisan Dorotheo 
Theodoro, the Vulcan of the expedition heretofore mentioned, undoubtedly 
made his escape from the coast and found his way to a more friendly tribe 
of Indians. Biedma relates that, "in the year 1540, when the soldiers 
under Soto came to the town of Mavila they heard that Don Dorotheo with 
his companion had been there, and they were shown a dirk that had been 
his." Mavila was the fortified Indian town situated at or near the junction 
of the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers, and between them. Here De Soto 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 339 

found the greatest resistance to his arms, and here was the scene of the 
hardest-fought battle of his campaign. 

Buckingham Smith gives cogent reasons for concluding that the island 
of " Malhado " was Santa Rosa. Cabega describes it in this language : 
"The distance [from this island] to the opposite shore of the main is two 
leagues in the widest place. The island is half a league in breadth and five 
leagues in length." That is, it was about seven miles from this island to 
the main land in the widest place, and the island was a mile and three- 
fourths wide and seventeen and one-half miles long. Taking this in con- 
nection with the fact that not far from this place Don Dorotheo and the 
black escaped, and inland not far from this De Soto found the dagger of 
Dorotheo, it is almost conclusive that it was one of the islands near the Mo- 
bile bay on which Cabega and his companions were stranded. 

A few days after Cabega's landing here, the crew of one of the other boats 
also landed at the other end of this island, among whom were Andres Do- 
rantes and Alonso del Castillo, who afterward with Estevanico became the 
companions of Cabega in his pilgrimage across the continent. 

On this island the survivors of these two boats determined to winter. It 
was now about the middle of November, the weather "tempestuous and 
eold," the food of the island scarce, consisting of roots dug from the earth 
beneath the water, and no means afforded at this time for catching fish. 
Hunger at last drove some to eat their dead companions, but it is recorded 
that four only were eaten. The winter was not half over Avhen only fifteen 
were living out of the eighty who landed. It appears that the natives of 
this island were friendly and disposed to help these suffering and starving 
adventurers. Yet they held them in a sort of slavery, for Cabega relates 
that he was kept apart from the others during the whole winter. In the 
spring they crossed from the island to the main land, and only two of them 
did he ever see again. For a whole year was Cabega kept upon this island, 
and he says: "Because of the hard work they put upon me, and their harsh 
treatment, I determined to flee from them and go to those of Chorruco, who 
inhabit the forests and country of the main, for the life I led was insup- 
portable." 

While in the island of "Malhado," however, he turned his attention to 
the sacred and mystic rites of the healer. He observed that the natives 
effect cures by the laying-on of hands and blowing upon the sick; by rub- 
bing a sacred stone over the parts affected, or by scarifying over the seat of 
pain, accompanied with a mumbled jargon of words and weird forms of in- 
cantation. He took lessons of a native physician, who insisted on his prac- 
ticing at once without examination or inquiring for his diploma. Cabega 
proved an apt scholar. These sacred rites of the superstitious savage he 
performed with ardor, adding thereto many of his own. Reciting a Pater- 
noster and an Ave-Maria, with a supplication to heaven accompanied by the 
sign of the cross, he pronounced the sick whole and commanded the lame to 



340 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

walk. It was by this method of supplication, this earnest prayer in an un- 
known tongue, with hands uplifted and his face turned to the orb of day, 
that he very soon came to be known among these rude sun-worshiping peo- 
ple as the '^ Child of the Sun" In his journey across the continent which 
he made in after years, he was met by multitudes, who came to be cured by 
the touch of his hands, to receive the divine unction, and be blessed with 
the breath of his voice and to pay liim adoration as the messenger from the 
sun. Here was the power, the occult science, the unseen and guiding hand 
which led him unharmed amidst hundred of tribes whose speech to him was 
unknown, over mountains and mighty streams, through jungles and dreary 
deserts for thousands of miles, barefoot, naked and defenseless, to his breth- 
ren who dwelt at the setting of the sun. 

About the first of December, 1529, Cabega left the island of "Malhado" 
where he had been held as a prisoner or in a sort of vassalage for more than 
a year, and went upon the main land. It appears that one of his compan- 
ions. Lope de Oviedo, was left on this island, and Cabega afterward went 
yearly for five years to try to persuade him to leave and go with him, but 
without avail. He started at last and met Cabega on the main land, but 
soon retraced his steps with the women who brought him, and was lost to 
history. 

As soon as Cabega entered on the main land he added to the Escula- 
pian science the manifold devices of the merchant as a means of support. 
Of this let him speak : 

" I set myself to trafficking and strove to tnrn my employment in the way I could 
best contrive, and by this means I got from the Indians food and good treatment. 
They would beg me to go from one port to another for things of which they have 
need ; for in consequence of continual hostilities they cannot travel the country nor 
make many exchanges. With my merchandise I went into the interior as far as I 
pleased, and I traveled along the coast forty or fifty leagues. The chief of my wares 
was pieces of sea-snails and their cones, conches that are used for cutting, and a 
fruit like a bean of the highest value among them, which they use as a medicine and 
employ in their dances and festivities. There are sea-beads also, and other articles. 
Such were what I carried into the interior ; and in barter for them, I brought back 
skins, ochre with which they rub and color their faces ; and flint for arrow-points, 
cement and hard canes of which to make arrows, and tassels that are made of the 
hair of deer ornamented and dyed red. This occupation suited me well, for the 
travel gave me liberty to go where I wished. I was not obliged to work, and was not 
a slave. My leading object while journeying in this business was to find out the 
way by which I should have to go forward, and I became well known to the inhabit- 
ants. ... I was in this country nearly six years alone among the Indians, and 
naked like them." 

During these six years, this high sheriff of a defunct civil government, 
in his new bailiwick acquired a remarkable knowledge and power. He be- 
came fluent in the principal languages of the different tribes along the Gulf 
coast, and far northward into the interior. He tells us their languages are 
numberless, and that he acquired six. He tires us with the names he has 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 341 

seen fit to bestow upon these children of the forest and plain, derived, no 
doubt, from some peculiarity of dialect, or habit, or location. He became 
expert in the arts of their traffic, and diligent in the accumulation of those 
articles of jewelry and adornment which decked the dusky maiden as she 
was led to the hymenial dance, or which gave color and savage tone to the 
chief and young brave just returned from the victorious chase or battle. 
But more than this, than all, he got such a hold on their religious nature, 
that he was not only held in reverence as a worker of miracles and a bene- 
factor among men, but as a being above the ordinary race of men, whom it 
were impiety to injure and sinful to disobey. He became the special object 
of adoration to the Avomen and children of every tribe with whom he came 
in contact. The women became his guides, his interpreters, his companions 
in the long and tiresome journey he undertook, and at last accomplished. 
Those of one tribe when they found they could not detain him, reluctantly 
but reverentially guided him to another tribe on his journey — told the story 
of his miraculous power and divine mission — pointed to the sun as his par- 
ent, and, receiving the blessing of his breath and the holy touch of his 
hands, left him in charge of his new-found worshippers. It then became in 
turn their mission to do as they who brought him had done. 

He tells us he remained in this tutelage nearly six years. This would 
bring it to about the month of September, 1534. The last of these six years 
is consumed in getting Dorantes, Castillo and Estevanico (a negro from the 
coast of Barbary) out of bondage. This was happily effected with much 
strategy and great risk of life, the particulars of which it is not necessary 
to recite here. 

About the middle of September, 1534, these four men took up their jour- 
ney northeastward toward "the high country." But as these children of 
the Sun were naked as when they were born, and regularly shed their skin, 
somewhat like the serpent but twice as often, and as it was now becoming 
cold and all the more so as they traveled northward, they resolved to tarry 
for the winter upon the banks of a river, which I take from a close study of 
the narrative to have been the Tombigbee, at a point not less than one hun- 
dred and fifty miles from the Gulf. Here they remained during eight 
moons, or until about the first of May, 1535. "In all this time," says 
Cabega, "the Indians came to seek us from many parts, and they said that 
most truly we were children of the Sun. Dorantes and the negro had to 
this time not attempted to practice, but because of the great solicitation 
made by those coming from diflferent parts to find us, we all became physi- 
cians, although, in being venturous and bold, I was the most remarkable." 
Here also they manufactured combs, mats, bows, arrows, and nets, and 
traded them for the food of the country. They also scraped skins which the 
Indians brought them to tan, and took as pay the scrapings, which they ate 
with a relish. 

The tribes of the coast, with whom they had been living, subsisted on a 



342 State Histobical Society. 

variety of articles of food : oysters, blackberries, roots, nuts, prickly-pears 
( both the fruit and the leaves), birds, lizards, snakes " which killed when they 
struck," spiders, worms, bark of trees, and mud. They were great smokers, 
doubtless of tobacco. In this habit they equaled, if not excelled, the white 
American of to-day ; for Cabega says : " Everywhere they produce stupe- 
faction, and to enjoy it they will give whatever they possess." They drank 
a tea made of the leaves of the Yupon {Ilex vomitiva), and after they have 
drank divinely, about three gallons to the man, they vomit. This spree 
lasts three days. During the orgies the cry everywhere is, "Who wants to 
drink ?" At this time all secular employment ends. The whole machinery 
of sober life stops. The women stand still. If they move they are chas- 
tised, for when they move the malign spirit enters the liquor. They also 
drank a liquor made of the prickly-pear, and it seems also to excess, for our 
chronicler says, "They are all great drunkards." The males bore their 
under lip, and thrust through the hole a stick of cane a palm in length, also 
through the nipples they thus wear the cane stick two palms in length, and 
as they go naked, this is the jewelry of the male attire. 

May-day is now upon them, and these four wanderers take their final 
leave of the low country. Before, however, they bid farewell to "the 
people of the Figs," they slay two dogs, a present to them from the natives, 
and give them as a meat-offering to their stomachs. They now enter upon 
a year's journey; but they go not unprotected nor alone. Guides they will 
always have, and thousands shall meet them to receive them well. There 
has floated down from the mountains on this river where they wintered the 
"sacred gourd." This Cabega takes in his hand, holding it aloft when he 
meets a new people, and never parts with it until he arrives at his journey's 
end. It is his principal insignia and mark of high rank. It insures his 
protection and that of his companions, and is a token of their good-will to 
all they meet. In a few days the mountains of northern Alabama come in 
view; and "they rise one upon another," says Cabega, "as coming out of 
the North Sea." The natives told him of great waters beyond, probably 
the great lakes, and mistaking the distance, Cabega supposed he was very 
near the North Sea, the hypothecated northern boundary of Florida. 

It must here be remembered that Florida was then all that tract of 
country south of the lakes or supposed North Sea, and east of a line pro- 
jected north from the Gulf shore of Mexico. So that it contained all that 
tract of country east and including the Mississippi Valley. Authors at 
this day, in searching the writings of those early explorers and travelers, 
often go wrong in not understanding this fact. The country to the west of 
Florida was the " Inland," a term which Cabega often uses in speaking of 
the country west of Florida, as above understood. 

After reaching the mountains, which only took three or four days, from 
the point where they wintered, as last stated, they were importuned by the 
natives, their guides, to pass or cross over to the eastward. This they re- 



Sixth Biennial Repobt. 343 

fused to do, for it was going in the wrong direction, as Cabega had made 
up his mind to go westward as soon as he had reached the high country. 
And thus he tells us they "ascended up the stream, and then inland along 
the base of the mountains for about 40 leagues," and those that came with 
them "returned down the stream, after having introduced them to a new 
and whiter race of Indians." This indicates clearly that they ascended 
that branch of the Black Warrior river west of the mountains, nearly to 
its source, then going westward, at length passed the mountain barrier. 
For he says : " We thus crossed over the mountains about seven leagues, and 
came upon a very beautiful river." This was the Tennessee. Not desiring 
to go farther north, but to the inland toward the sunset, they go along this 
"beautiful" river, and travel through "wooded vales," and among so many 
sorts of people of such diverse languages, that the memory of Cabeea fails 
to recall them. During this journey sometimes a thousand people ac- 
companied them, bringing them food and giving them a propitious introduc- 
tion to the new tribes they met. They would then receive the divine 
blessing of the healer and return — the travelers to be again guided by 
the new acquaintances, and turned over to others farther on, with the like 
blessings and the like reverential and hospitable entertainment. "At last," 
says Cabega, "in company with these we crossed a great river coming from 
the north; and passing over some plains thirty leagues in extent, [100 
miles,] we found many persons who came from a great distance to receive 
us, and they met us on the road over which we had to travel, and received 
us in the same manner of those we had left." This great river, coming 
from the north, was the Mississippi; and it was, no doubt, its first discovery 
by white men within recorded time. Cabega preceded De Soto just six 
years, who crossed it near the same place. This arises from the fact that 
at that time, and in all ages, perhaps, the people of any country, whether 
wild or tame, civilized or uncivilized, have established highways for long 
journeys, and by-ways for short ones. It cannot be supposed for a moment, 
that Cabega and his companions went into pathless woods and over track- 
less prairies in search of the South Sea. They went rather upon the great 
thorougfares of the nations of the New World, and continually led by their 
faithful guides from one village to another, until they found their journey's 
end. De Soto has the recorded honor of discovering the Mississippi : to 
Cabega de Vaca belongs the fact. 

They passed over it at a point westward from the great elbow of the Ten- 
nessee, and most likely passing down through the vales of the Hatchie, 
crossed the "Great Biver'' near its confluence therewith. Then west one 
hundred miles would take them into the mountainous regions of Arkansas. 

Here they came upon a new people, of whom Cabega says: "So great 
was the fear upon them that during the first days they were with us they 
were continually trembling, without daring to do, speak, or raise their eyes 
to the heavens. They guided us through more than fifty leagues (175 miles) 



344 STATE HiSTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

of desert, over very rough mountains, which being very dry were without 
game, and in consequence we suffered much from hunger. At the termi- 
nation we forded a very large river, the water coming up to our breasts." 
Here, he says, they entered upon the plains. The mountains here spoken 
of by Cabeca were the Boston and other mountains of Arkansas, and fifty 
leagues would bring them about to the Neosho river in the Indian Terri- 
tory. This they crossed breast deep. They are now west of the Neosho 
about fifty miles north of its confluence with the Arkansas. Cabeoa now 
says: " We told these people that we desired to go where the sun sets; and 
they said that they who lived in that direction were remote. We com- 
manded them to send and make known our coming, but they strove to ex- 
cuse themselves as best they could, for that people were their enemies." 
Finally Cabega persuaded them to risk the danger, and two women were 
sent forward. Cabeea and his party followed for two days, and waited for 
the women to come back ; but not coming as soon as expected, Cabega says : 
"We told them to conduct us toward the north, and they answered as they 
had done before, saying that in that direction there were no people except 
afar off; that there was nothing to eat, nor could water be found." This 
was at some point between the Neosho and the Verdigris rivers. Now, 
while they were there waiting, Cabega tells us: "The women got back 
whom we sent away, and said that they had found very few people, and that 
they had nearly all gone for cattle, for it was then in the season of them." 
This was probably in October, and the people further on whom they were 
seeking had gone out on a ''cow-hunt." In three days more they crossed 
another river, "which ran between certain ridges." What other was this 
than the Verdigris ? And the ridges are those high elevations of land which 
so peculiarly mark the course of this stream for hundreds of miles, and 
from its very source to its confluence with the Arkansas. 

At the Verdigris they met a new people, enemies to those who conducted 
them there, and who spoke a different language. They now discharged the 
latter, giving them what they had received on their arrival, viz. : beans, 
pumpkins and calabashes, blankets of cow-hide, and other things. Here 
Cabega remained one day, and the next he left the Verdigris and went west 
toward the Arkansas, for he says: 

"We set out with these Indians, who took us to the settled habitations of others 
who lived upon the same food. From this place forward they began to give us 
many blankets of skins, and they had nothing that they did not give to us. They 
have the finest persons of any that we saw, and of the greatest activity and strength, 
and who best understood us and intelligently answered our inquiries. We called 
them 'los de las vacas,' the cow nation, because the most of the cattle that are killed 
are destroyed in their neighborhood ; and along up that river for over fifty leagues 
[175 miles] they kill great numbers." 

He was now undoubtedly upon the Arkansas river, and at a point some- 
where near the mouth of the Cimarron. It may have been a day's travel 
further down, but not more, if we follow the course laid down in the text. 



Sixth biennial Repobt. 345 

I am aware that Buckingham Smith, the translator of Cabe^*a, indicates 
that he crossed the Arkansas river at the mouth of the Canadian, and he 
takes the party to New Mexico from that point in a direction a little south- 
westward. But this is counter to the text and opposed to other established 
historical facts. The translator in fact says in a note: 

"If the route on the map from the Canadian river be found correct, it presents a 
doubt as to the alleged direction of Coronado, in the year 1541, towards the north- 
east from a town thirty leagues to the north of Tignex." 

But the doubt is resolved against the translator's map by all the evidences 
in regard to the course of Coronado. The text of Cabega, however, itself 
settles the question. I will give it in full. But first let me say: the point 
at which he is speaking is where they first came to the Arkansas river. Here 
they were told in regard to some maize the Indians had, that it grew in a 
land which could be reached by going directly toward the setting sun. There 
Cabega desired to go, and two routes were indicated, but a certain one was 
taken, as the following will show. I quote : 

"Two days having been spent while we tarried there, we determined to go in 
quest of the maize. We did not wish to follow the path that leads to where the cat- 
tle are, because it is toward the north and for us was very circuitous, since we ever 
held it certain that going toward the sunset we must find that which we desired. 
. . . We also desired to know whence they got that maize, and they told us 
from where the sun goes down, and that it grows throughout that region, and that 
the nearest of it was by that path. Since they did not desire to go thither, we asked 
them by which direction we might best proceed, and to inform us concerning the 
way : they said that the path was along up that river toward the north, and that in 
a journey of seventeen days we should not find anything to eat but a fruit they 
called chacan, which is ground between stones, and even after this preparation it 
could not be eaten for its dryness and pungency, which was so, for they showed it to 
us there and we could not eat it.* They told us also that whilst we traveled by the 
river upward, we should all the way pass through a people that were their enemies, 
who spoke their tongue, and who had nothing to give us to eat, but would receive 
us with the best good-will ; that they would present us with many blankets of cot- 
ton, hides, and other articles of their wealth ; but for all this it appeared to them 
that we ought not, by any means, to take that course. Doubting what would be 
best to do, and which way we should choose for suitableness and support, we re- 
mained with these Indians two days." 

Now here is how they resolved the doubt. I quote : 

"Thus we took our way and traversed all the country until coming out at the 
South Sea. Nor did the dread we had of the sharp hunger through which we should 
have to pass, as in verity we did through the seventeen days'* journey of which they had 
spoken, suffice to hinder us. During all that time in ascending by the river the na- 
tives gave us many blankets of cowhide, and we did not eat of the fruit (chacan), 
but our substance each day was about a handful of deer suet, which we had a long 
time been used to saving for such trials. Thus we passed the entire journey of seven- 

*Thi8 was no other than the ground acorn of the black-oak tree, which is so abundant along the 
Arkansas from that point into Kansas, as far north as the southern boundary of Sedgwick county, and 
which the Indians have thus ground and eaten from time immemorial. 



346 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

teen days, and at the end we crossed the river and traveled other seventeen days. As 
the sun went down upon some plains that lie there between chains of very great 
mountains, we found a people who for the third part of the year eat nothing but 
the powder of a certain straw, and it being that season at the time we passed, we 
also had to eat of it until we had reached permanent habitations, where there was 
abundance of maize in close succession. They gave us large quantities of it in 
grain and flour, and calabashes, beans, and blankets of cotton. Of all these we 
loaded the people who had guided us there, and they then returned the happiest 
creatures on earth." 

If now you will take two points on the map, one at the confluence of the 
Cimarron river with the Arkansas and the other at Las Vegas, New Mex- 
ico, you will find the approximate points from which and to which Cabega 
traveled indicated in the narrative last quoted. When he arrived at the 
Arkansas there arose a doubt in his mind whether he should go straight 
ivest toward the setting sun to the ''Land of Maize" or go up and around 
by the Arkansas through the " Cow Country.'' But he resolved the doubt 
in favor of the " very circuitous route," going, as he says, by ascending the 
river toward the north for seventeen days before he crossed it. We can 
safely allow twenty miles for a day's travel, which they could easily make, 
for he says: "We never felt exhaustion, neither were in fact at all weary, 
so inured were we to hardships." This estimate would give three hundred 
and forty miles for the first seventeen days' journey, and would take them 
to the crossing of the old Santa Fe trail at the Arkansas. A like distance 
would take them to Las Vegas or thereabout, providing they followed " the 
trail." 

It is not to be supposed that that great land-way is of recent origin. The 
commerce of this continent no doubt for thousands of years found its way 
over that path. The ancient dusky traders took the copper of Lake Supe- 
rior, the fine furs of the colder regions, the antlers and skins of the moose 
and elk, the robes of the wolf and the buffalo, and the sacred red pipe-stone 
out of which they carved their pipes of peace, and passing along this great 
highway of commerce to the southern sea, traded them for the gaudy plu- 
mage, the precious stones and metals, the cloth and the bread of the tropics. 
How far back in time this commerce existed, no one can tell. Certain we 
are that it was before Columbus, before the Northmen landed, before Madoc 
came to be made immortal by the poet Southey, nay, before Plato wrote and 
pictured an Atlantis, peopled in the waters of the West. Archseological 
researches point to a time contemporaneous with the mammoth, and for the 
purpose of this paper, beyond that time we need not pass. It is a part of 
my task to prove from Cabega himself, that he came into that country 
where Kansas should be, and swung around the great bend of the Arkansas 
river, through the "Cow Country" of the continent, and passed out of it on 
the great land-way of ancient commerce. I have studiously read and reread 
several times his " Relations," and have tried many possible routes for him 
to take, but each hypothesis, except this one, utterly fails to comply with 



Sixth Biennial Report. 347 

the text, and absolutely contradicts the established facts of contemporaneous 
history, as to distance, topography, or course. This one meets ev«ry re- 
quirement. 

On his route Cabega saw black buifalo among the brown. They have 
not been seen in recent years. But that was a long time ago. When we 
count back we find it was three hundred and fifty-four years ago last Octo- 
ber; two hundred and forty-one years before Uncle Sam was born. Buffalo 
could have changed from black to white in that time, as a specimen in the 
archives of the capitol attests. But let me quote Cabega: 

"Inland there are many deer and birds and beasts other than I have spoken of. 
Cattle come as far as this. I have seen them three times, and eaten of their meat. 
I think they are about the size of those of Spain. They have small horns like the 
cows of Morocco, and the hair very long and flocky, like that of the merino ; some 
are light brown, others black. To my judgment the flesh is finer and fatter than 
that of this country. The Indians make blankets of the hides of those not full 
grown, and of the larger they make shoes and bucklers. They come as far as the sea- 
coast of Florida in a direction from the north, and range over a district of more 
than four hundred leagues ; and in the whole extent of plain over which they ran 
the people that inhabit near there descend and live on them and scatter a vast many 
skins throughout the country." 

This is the first recorded description of the buffalo. 

I must call attention again to the fact that Florida at that time took in a 
part of what is Texas now, and the buffalo coming as far as the seacoast of 
Florida from the north is thus easy to comprehend. 

He has now reached the land of the Pueblos, and on his path, five years 
afterward, shall Coronado pass into Kansas in search of Quivira. These 
people he found living in settled domiciles, some of earth and others of cane 
mats. Here they w^ere fed and clothed. They received deer to eat and cot- 
ton blankets to wear. They were presented with beads, corals found in the 
South Sea, many fine turquoises that came from the north, and emeralds 
made into arrow-heads. The people brought the sick to be cured, the babes 
to be touched, and all came to receive the blessing; "and when the sun rose 
they opened their hands, together with loud shoutings toward the heavens, 
and then drew them down all over their bodies. They did the same again 
when the sun went down." Thus in this way did these primitive worshippers 
of the sun pay adoration to the great orb of day, and welcome those first 
white travelers as divine messengers from on high; for out of the east they 
looked for their heavenly king to come. 

The first town after entering the land of the Pueblos he named "El 
Pueblo de los Corazones" — The Toivn of Hearts, for here they received a 
great supply of the hearts of deer. He says : " It is the entrance into many 
provinces that are on the South Sea, and whoever go to seek it and do not 
enter there will be lost." 

Whatever Pueblo town this may have been — ancient Cicuye,the Pecos of 
to-day, or Las Vegas, or one on the site of Santa Fe, or below the turquoise 
—23 • 



348 State Histobical Society. 

mountains of the Cerillos — matters not. One thing is certain : he came to a 
people who highly prized the turquoise, and the gift of this was a peculiar 
offering as a token of respect and friendship. Four years after, when Alva- 
rado, the advance scout of Coronado, reached Cicuy6, Henry W. Haynes, 
in Winsor's American History, says, " he was welcomed with great demon- 
strations of friendship, and received many gifts of turquoises, which were 
abundant in that country." This was the region of the Pueblo cities of 
New Mexico, comprising Cibola, Cuco, Taos, Cicuy^, and others known to 
history by the discoverers of those early Spaniards, in their search after 
the seven cities of Cibola. When people came hither from the south coun- 
try they were paid for their work in the fields in turquoises and skins of 
cattle, and it was reported to Fray Marcos when he went on a pilgrimage 
of discovery into this region, after Cabega and before Coronado, "That all 
the people there wore turquoises in their ears and noses, and were clad in 
long cotton robes reaching to their feet, with a girdle of turquoises around 
the waist." But Cabega, in his relations, recounts all about the peculiar 
gift of the turquoises, the cotton clothing, the tilled fields, the fixed habita- 
tions, in this land of Maize, which he discovered at its very entrance from 
the land of Cattle, and made his report of all these things as soon as he 
arrived in Mexico, to the Viceroy Mendoga. 

It is conceded by all historians since Simpson wrote his article on " Coro- 
nado's March," that the ancient place called Cicuy4 was located at or near 
Pecos. Now it is related of Coronado that "on quitting Cicuye, in his jour- 
ney to Quivira, they immediately entered the mountains, and after four 
days' march came to a river recently swollen by rains, over which they were 
forced to build a bridge." This was near Las Vegas, according to Simpson. 
Note the remarkable language and coincidence with Cabega's relations: 
"From here they journeyed in a direction northeast over the plains, and in 
a few days fell in with immense herds of bison. At this time, after seven- 
teen days' march, they came upon a band of nomads, called Querecheos, 
busy in the pursuit of these animals." A few days farther on it is related 
that Coronado sent out an exploring expedition under Roderigo Maldonado, 
who came to a village in a great ravine, where a blind old man gave them 
to understand that some time before, four of their countrymen had been 
there. These the Spaniards believed were Cabega and his three companions. 
These Indians were friendly, and presented the Spaniards with a great quan- 
tity of tanned skins, and a tent as large as a house. And when the whole 
army was brought to this spot, they proceeded at once to divide the skins 
among themselves to the great chagrin of the natives, who had supposed 
that they would only bless the skins, as Cabega de Vaca had done, and then 
return them. This proves that Coronado followed the path of Cabeea at 
least 400 miles northeastward from Las Vegas, and must have been in Kan- 
sas. It is evident that neither or else both were here, at that early day. 



Sixth Biennial Repobt, 349 

But, to return to Cabeca : 

A day's jouruey farther on from the "Town of Hearts" they came to 
another town, and where the rain fell so heavily that the river became so 
swollen it detained them fifteen days. How like this is to what Castenado 
records of Coronado's march, when at or about this point. A river became 
so swollen from recent rains that it detained the army four days, and until 
bridges could be made on which to pass over. 

But here they made a discovery. Cabega relates that: "Castello saw on 
the neck of an Indian the buckle of a sword-belt, and tied to it the nail for 
a horse-shoe. He received them, and we asked the native what they were, 
and he answered that they came from Heaven. We questioned him further 
as to who brought them thence, and they all responded that certain men 
that wore beards like us had come from Heaven and arrived at that river, 
and that they brought horses and lances and swords, and that they had 
lanced two Indians. In a manner of the utmost indifference that we could 
feign we then asked them what had become of those men ; and they answered 
us that they had gone to sea, had put their lances beneath the water, and that 
afterward they were seen on the surface going toward the sunset." They 
then told these natives that they were "going in search of this people, to 
tell them not to kill them, nor to make them slaves, nor to take from them 
their country, nor do them other injustice; and of this they were glad." 

After crossing this stream, which to my mind was the Rio Grande, they 
were guided to a town on the edge of a range of mountains, "to which," 
says Cabega, "the ascent is over difficult crags." Here was the town of 
Acoma, the ancient city Acuco, mentioned by Castanado, and visited by 
the army of Coronado five years afterward; and which Espejo, in 1583, de- 
scribes as " situated upon a high rock, which Avas about fifty paces high, 
having no other entrance but by a ladder or pair of stairs hewn into the 
same rock." From this Cabega traveled westward and entered Zuni, the 
famed city of Cibola, and thence southward to the South Sea, arriving at 
Compostella about the twentieth of May, 1536. Here the Governor clothed 
them ; but for many days they could not wear the clothing long at a time 
nor could they sleep anywhere but on the ground. About the first of June 
they entered Mexico and were handsomely treated, and welcomed by ihe 
viceroy, Mendoga, and the celebrated conqueror, Hernan Cortes ; and their 
eyes once more kindled, and their hearts rejoiced to behold a joust of reeds 
and bulls on the day of Saint lago. 

In all this enterprise, and in all this journey from sea to sea, we behold 
a man of no ordinary parts. Stranded upon a continent too large for a 
conquering army, he himself became a conqueror by addressing himself to 
the religious nature of its people. He studied their habits of life, their 
methods of intercourse, their languages, the topography of the country, for 
six years, ever with his thought intent upon his escape and his eyes turned 



350 STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

to the west. Naked as when he was born, he goes forth, his body torn by 
brambles and thorns, scorched and blistered in the southern sun, tortured 
with flies and mosquitoes, ever in dread of lions and panthers, of serpents 
and venomous reptiles, whose strike is death, with feet bleeding as he treads 
the flints and scoria? of the mountains, and without food of any kind for 
days, we behold this remarkable man with the sacred gourd held aloft in 
his hand, wending his way to the setting sun. He now makes his way 
from the forests and swamps of the Gulf coast to the hills of the upland, 
then reaches the mountains of northern Alabama, climbs their summit and 
looks down into the beautiful valley of the Tennessee — passes through her 
enchanted vales of wooded landscape, and then westward to the great Father 
of Waters. With feelings of wonder and awe, he now stops to gaze upon 
this mighty stream, with its slow and irresistible sweep. He now skims 
its surface in a canoe, and with hurried pace moves still westward, across 
plains and mountains, until he reaches the unbounded prairies, the far- 
famed country of the cattle. Thence he passes with ardent thought and 
quicker step around the great bend of the Arkansas, where in the dim 
future shall arise a mighty State, founded on the idea that man shall hold 
no property in man, and to be named after a race of natives that were 
among their brethren as irresistible as the wind. 

Kansas the name ; child of the wind 

That sweeps her grassy fields and brings 
The storm upon his fretful wings, 
Or on the tempest rides, and flings 

The torn and scattered wreck behind. 

He now reaches the great commercial land-way of the continent, then on 
this time-worn path passes down to the gates of the mountains, into which 
he enters, to a people who meet him as a messenger from the sun, and be- 
fore whom they fall down in reverence and awe. 
Heralder of a mighty state, 
' Whose soil thy own brave feet have trod, 

Whose hand first waved the potent rod 
Of empire o'er her emerald sod, — 
Cabega, first among the great. 



Sixth Biexxial Bepobt. 351 



KANSAS HISTORY. 



[Address delivered at the Annual Meeting, January 21, 1890, by Colonel W. A. Phil- 
lips, President of the Society.] 

History is the record of events — not the advertisement of localities. 
The northern half of Asia is as much a blank book, as Canada away from 
the St. Lawrence. If we take out Egypt and Carthage, Africa is a dark — 
a very dark — continent, indeed. Is or can we accept from Egypt a pyramid 
for history. The names of the aristocratic families entombed there, even 
if we could rescue them from oblivion, are of far less consequence than the 
tears and agony of the thousands of slaves who perished building them. 
History proper is the crystallization of thought; ideas grown into works 
and institutions. 

But a few years ago — you and I can remember the time Kansas was the 
^' Great American Desert." That is, historically; and we have learned that 
what is called history is not, necessarily, accurate. Still, the "Desert" was 
not all a myth. I can remember several long stretches of country, where, 
in ante-bellum days, the sands drifted and blew, where the grass grew not, 
but a few miniature plum trees might be seen, or wild rose-bush. In the 
course of time, however, grass straggled over and covered it, and the squat- 
ters finally made farms upon it; and I ceased to be positive in my opinion 
concerning it. Who can sketch the ancient history of Kansas, when, in 
one of the earth's mighty cataclysms, all the ridges, and hills, and peaks, 
were heaved up from the sea or lake where they had rested, and were first 
in narrow, serrated hills and ridges, with a gorge at the bottom, which 
gradually filled up, and leveled, with washings from the hills, and until the 
broad, rich valleys appeared, and the present Kansas landscape took shape ? 
Would it be wonderful if beaches and sandy reaches from the depths of the 
forgotten sea, should be left here and there, or even saline or alkaline deposits, 
or the bones of monstrous saurians, who once disported in the waters, banished 
forevermore ? And then came the buffalo and the buffalo grass, and the beau- 
tiful herds of antelope, and the majestic herds of elk. I have, as late as 1866, 
seen several thousand of these latter magnificent creatures in a herd ; and 
small bands of black-tailed deer among the bluffs and cedars of the upper 
Smoky, Saline and Solomon. I have seen immense herds of buffalo cover 
the landscape, and make it as black as ink in the early summer-time, as far 
as the eye could reach. Who can tell how many centuries passed, in which 
these mighty herds grazed on and enriched, and fell down and left their 
bodies to create the deep, black soil of Kansas ? Fragments of their bones 
are still found in digging wells, ten and even twenty feet from the surface. 



352 STATE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 

Enormous deposits of gypsum in central Kansas added to the wondrous 
fertility. With the buffalo and other game, followed those who preyed on 
them. When the little marmot we call the prairie dog founded its towns on 
the beautiful plains, the owl and the hawk, the rattlesnake and coyote fol- 
lowed it. With the buffalo and elk there sneaked along the prairie wolf 
and mountain lion. I have heard the deep bass roar of the latter many a 
time along the valleys of western Kansas. Last, but not least among the 
foraging races, came man — the nomadic red man of the plains. For them 
these were the primitive, happy Arcadian days. Their white skin tents 
cast a shadow in the sunlight, and shimmered in the moonlight. The buf- 
falo was to them the gift of the Great Spirit, and when slain, they permitted 
no part of the carcass to be wasted. Their women dug wild potatoes on the 
hillside, and gathered fruits and nuts in the woods. They were not alto- 
gether insensible to sanitary conditions, for instead of moving the filth the 
town moved. The chase was at once their occupation and enjoyment, war 
the occasional but startling event. Free as the breezes that swept over 
Kansas, these, its early denizens, recognized no authority save the volun- 
tary respect to the words of the wise, or the command of an accepted leader 
in battle. They had their historical so